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Posts tagged with Data Privacy

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): what we know & what's coming next

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – an EU-wide overhaul of consumer data laws aimed at strengthening the protection of people’s data privacy – was announced at the tail end of 2015.  

The new laws won’t be finalised until later this year, and won’t take effect for another two years after that.

But in a talk I attended at Data Protection 2016 on Friday, two leading government figures did their best to tell the audience what to expect and explain why the reform is happening. 


The five-point plan for data privacy & business

On Friday I attended a talk at Data Protection 2016 that was all about – you guessed it – data, but specifically how businesses can continue to thrive in the ever-evolving data economy.   

The talk from Ctrl-Shift CEO Liz Brandt covered five key action points that business and government need to tackle together in order to avert a future crisis.

I’m going to cover them in detail in this post.  

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Four key factors businesses need to know about privacy in 2016

While enterprises are racing to deploy new tech that will drive revenue through uses of data, they must consider these latest technologies within the context of the EU’s new data protection law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Here are four key factors that businesses need to know about privacy in 2016:


Three’s a crowd: how first-party data builds customer relationships

Three’s a crowd, and I’m not referring to failed 80s sitcoms. I’m talking about customer relationships.

Yet according to a study by the UC Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, 85% of the top 1,000 websites have cookies set by a third party.

Propelled by widespread anonymity in the early days of the Internet, third-party cookies have undoubtedly become a staple for many marketers, tracking consumer behaviors across the web with the promise of uncovering invaluable insights.

Not only is this an invasion of consumer privacy (more on that later), but it also prevents businesses from truly knowing and understanding their customers.

First-party data, transparently collected via voluntary user registration, on-site activities and interactions, removes data brokers as middlemen, establishing direct brand and consumer connections and fostering 1:1 relationships.

Let’s take a look at three ways that third-party cookies are hurting your customer relationships, and how first-party data can be collected and used to improve audience understanding and user experiences.

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Eight interesting digital marketing stats we saw this week

Well hello there, and welcome back to our weekly stats roundup.

This time it includes data about Enhanced Campaigns, Facebook's earnings, analytics tools, Christmas, data privacy and the thorny relationship between CIOs and CMOs.

For more of this type of thing, download the Econsultancy Internet Statistics Compendium...


Spotlight on data privacy: three steps to building consumer trust

Consumer concern about data privacy has shifted over the past decade.

More than ten years ago, consumers were concerned when companies such as Amazon analyzed their data to provide them with a recommended list of products they may be interested in based on their purchase habits.

Fast forwarding to today, many consumers now expect companies to mine their data through the use of analytics to provide them with relevant offers and products to improve their shopping experience.

Yet, recent data breaches have placed a spotlight on data privacy once again, moving the topic of consumer personalization versus privacy back to the forefront of the marketing conversation. 


Privacy and personalization: a marketer's Catch-22

Coined in Joseph Heller’s classic satirical novel of the same name, 'Catch-22' is a term that refers to a situation in which a person is trapped by completely contradictory goals or circumstances.

In Heller’s book, the only way for a pilot to escape his WWII flying mission is to request psychiatric evaluation due to mental instability, and be deemed insane.

However, awareness of his own insanity is considered proof of a rational mind, thus making it impossible to escape his mission, a total and complete Catch-22.

No doubt, many marketers are feeling stuck in this sort of paradoxical situation when it comes to the competing goals of consumer privacy and personalization.


Will you survive the logged-in user revolution?

If you don’t think identity plays a significant role in user experience, think again.

Case in point: I was recently browsing my favorite footwear site on my smartphone for the perfect pair of shoes, but when I returned to purchase my pair of choice via desktop, I had to spend upwards of 10 minutes trying to find it again.

How much better would my experience have been if I had instead been greeted with a personalized product showcase featuring my 'most recently browsed' items?  

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10 interesting digital marketing stats we've seen this week

Here are some of the most interesting digital marketing statistics we saw last week.

Statistics include the #nomakeupselfie campaign, Nasty Gal's mobile experience, second-screening, data privacy, US ecommerce sales and social traffic to newpapers.

For more digital marketing stats, check out our Internet Statistics Compendium.

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Taking action on data privacy: tag management looks mandatory

The question on privacy is now not about what the law will require (we know what legislators want), it is what technical fixes can be made to comply.

New rules to prevent the digital industry from tracking user behaviour on the web without their explicit consent are pending both in the US and Europe and, as yet, we see little activity by advertisers to make ready.