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Posts tagged with Databases

Five legitimate use cases for NoSQL databases

NoSQL may be one of the most overhyped technology trends in the past couple of years, and a growing number of companies that left their relational databases behind for a NoSQL fling are rethinking their decisions.

Yet organizations continue to adopt NoSQL solutions and investors are still eager to pour money into vendors behind the most popular of them.

Are they crazy, or has some of the NoSQL skepticism been overdone?

The truth of the matter is that, hype aside, there is a role for NoSQL solutions to play in a world consumed by data, and increasingly companies are making smart decisions about when to use relational databases and when to turn to their NoSQL cousins.


One cloud to rule them all? Amazon launches AWS Marketplace

According to a report from research firm DeepField Networks, Amazon's AWS cloud now powers 1% of the internet. If this number is anywhere close to accurate, it's a stunning figure, particularly when one considers that Amazon started as an online retailer of books.

But Amazon's cloud ambitions are huge, and in an effort to grow its cloud even more, Amazon today launched the AWS Marketplace, a one-stop shop for AWS customers to, with a single click, purchase and deploy cloud servers running the software they need.


Valentine’s Day campaigns show email turn-offs

After my Valentine’s Day analysis of online dating sites and what’s so great about their email, I decided to compare their performance around the holiday to a sample of retail marketers to measure the effectiveness of these sorts of big seasonal marketing drives.

Online dating sites aren’t the only ones who use Valentine’s Day to implement a big marketing push.

Retailers selling products like chocolates, flowers and gift cards also stepped up their game (and their email activity) to capitalise on the most romantic day of the year.


NoSQL for the rest of us

NoSQL is fast becoming one of the trendiest tech buzzwords, and that means one thing: geek fights!

The relational database may not be dead, but there are legitimate debates about NoSQL alternatives to popular RDBMSes like MySQL, MS SQL Server and Oracle.

For most companies, however, such debates may seem too technical and abstract to be of any importance. But that doesn't mean that the NoSQL 'movement' should be ignored.


Five open-source NoSQL technologies worth looking at

The relational database is dead. Okay, that may be a stretch, but thanks in large part to the demands of massively-popular consumer internet services and sophisticated enterprise applications alike, more and more developers are finding that, for certain applications, moving away from relational databases is not only desirable, but practically necessary.

One of the biggest benefits of 'NoSQL' solutions is that many do away with schema. In other words, developers don't need to define a rigid structure for data, as they do with relational databases. When dealing with certain kinds of data, this is ideal. Additionally, for some applications, relational databases have less-than-stellar performance and can be very difficult and expensive to scale.


Will MySQL falter under Oracle's ownership?

Oracle's pending acquisition of Sun Microsystems apparently has some users of MySQL worried. MySQL, of course, is the open source database owned by Sun and offered freely under a GNU General Public License.

It's the most popular open source RDBMS in the world, and is used with popular products like WordPress and on major websites like Facebook and Wikipedia.

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MySQL 5.4 looks hot

MySQL is the most widely-used open-source database in the world. Many popular open-source applications, from WordPress to SugarCRM to Joomla!, use it. And popular websites like Facebook and Twitter rely on it as well.

The popular database system is offered by MySQL AB, which was purchased by Sun Microsystems in 2008. Sun Microsystems, of course, was just purchased for $7.4bn by database and enterprise software giant Oracle.

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