Posts tagged with Delivery Charges

Handling online returns: 14 best practice tips

Returns are an issue for every retailer, and some sectors more than others.

They could be viewed as bothersome, but the returns process does offer an opportunity to showcase your excellent customer service and can have a positive impact of future retention rates, if done well. 

There is much you can do to reduce returns rates, providing better imagery and information on product pages, but even the best site will experience returns. 

So then it comes down to how you handle the returns process, and the better you handle this, the better your retention rates. 

Here are 14 tips to help you to avoid annoying your customers...

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Online retailers still need to improve returns processes: report

While retailers have improved in areas such as refunding delivery charges, there is still room for more flexibility and simplicity in returns policies.

For example, 52% of retailers studied didn't offer any choice of return methods, while 9% of refunds took more than 14 days to arrive. 

These are a few of the findings from the Snow Valley 2011 Online Returns & Refunds report... 

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10 reasons why Xmas shoppers won't return to your site

With record online spending expected this Christmas, retailers have a great opportunity to acquire and retain new customers. 

If customers have an excellent experience through purchase to delivery (and beyond if they need to return items), then they are more likely to return to make future purchases.  

I've listed ten things for retailers to avoid once a customer has made a purchase online...

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Why online retailers shouldn't charge for returns

Even if a customer has had an excellent experience with a retailer through the buying and delivery process, returns is one area where things can go wrong. 

Making the returns process easy and free for customers is one way to ensure they retain a positive impression of a retailer, even if the product wasn't suitable for them. This makes is more likely that they will return and make purchases in future. 

Charging for returns is one sure-fire way to annoy customers and deter them from future purchase, so I've been looking at etailers' returns policies to see which ones are doing this...

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