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Posts tagged with Filters

Eight examples of fashion ecommerce product filters: Good & bad

Product filters might seem like a small and even insignificant feature on an ecommerce site. But in reality, a slick system can be the difference between a seamless user experience and a clunky one.

With this in mind, I did a little digging to see the state of play on some of the most popular fashion retailers online.

Here are a few product filters that caught my eye – both good and bad.

1 comment

Search results on travel sites: examples and best practices

Search results pages on travel sites should help customers to find the best deal for them without having to work too hard. 

Last year I looked at a range of search tools from travel websites, which highlighted the importance of flexibility when users search for travel. 

Time spent searching for flights recently has reminded me of the value of excellent search results pages, and here I look at several examples, good and bad. 

For this I'm looking at flight search, but the lessons apply equally to hotel and general holiday search. 


A bold new website design for Fat Face: does it work?

Outdoor clothing retailer Fat Face recently relaunched its ecommerce site. Thanks to some interesting design features, I thought the site was worth reviewing. 

These features include persistent filtered navigation, a novel idea, and light boxes for product pages.  

So will these features work for Fat Face? Let's take a closer look....

Colston Hall

Reflections on building a new arts website

This week, we’ve been singing the praises of Colston Hall’s new website (it’s a concert hall in Bristol, England).

We’re not going to gush any more, but we thought our readership might be interested to hear from agency and client, as to the process of redesign. What were the hopes, fears, successes, failures? How did the tender process go down? What happens next?

Attempting to answer some of these questions, I’ve been talking to Carly Heath, Marketing and Press Officer at Colston Hall, and Graeme Swinton, Creative Director at Palace.


Who'd've thunk it? Colston Hall: a delicious, flagship website for the arts

Every so often, whether you work in digital or not, one visits a website and gets a slap across the face. One dawdles for a moment, scrolling around and wondering how web design has come so far in such a short period of time.

Colston Hall is one of these websites. OK, it’s a fairly sizeable concert hall in Bristol, England, but still, it’s in the arts sector, this isn’t meant to be so slick, right?

Cecile Eschenauer kindly pointed us to Colston Hall’s website, designed by Palace, after reading Chris Lake’s article on colour and UIs.

Looking at comparable venues (e.g. York Barbican, Newcastle’s Metro Arena) Colston Hall is way ahead, it’s in the future. Other small and medium arts spaces are going to have to catch up, or miss out on maximising ticket sales.

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Three steps to building a customer-centric navigation structure

Building an ecommerce product database to satisfy your target consumer requires three disciplines in order to get it right: usability, the use of filters and naming convention.  

In this context to 'satisfy' is to display navigation in an intuitive manner, to use navigation techniques to compliment the buying process, and to name category titles your consumers recognise and understand.  

This topic normally falls into the 'too hard' category, and is driven by legacy product database systems with little or no flexibility. If you have the time, and the infrastructure to manage the database from the perspective of the consumer experience, then work to these disciplines.

Rock Your Analytics

How to rock your Google Analytics: five tricks to help you out

There is no doubt that running a site is tough, we need to work harder and smarter than our competition to keep ahead in the game.

Analytics gives us all the data we need to make our websites even better but it needs to be set up right first; here are some tips and tricks to help you on your way.


Yelp fights lawsuits in the court of public opinion

2010 has not been a kind year so far to Yelp. The popular customer reviews website is now facing not one, not two, but three separate lawsuits which essentially allege that the company has built a business by extorting local businesses.

They claim that, in an effort to turn listed businesses into paying advertisers, Yelp salespeople have offered to remove bad reviews, and that they've also removed good reviews when businesses turn down advertising solicitations. Not surprisingly, Yelp has vigorously denied the charges leveled against it. And it's not waiting for a court date to make the case that it's innocent.


Memo to Twitter: please deal with #Spymasterspam

Last Friday I wrote a piece called ‘How Twitter can dig itself out of hashtag hell’, urging Twitter to allow users to turn off ‘spam’. The trouble is that spam isn’t always defined by a hashtag (such as #Spymasterspam).

Consider the rise of the Spymaster game on Twitter. This is yet another reason why Twitter needs to quickly introduce personalisation features.

It’s hard to put into words how little I care about somebody reaching level 11 on Spymaster, or attempting an assassination attempt on @somebodyelse. And I’m not alone.

I’m sure the game itself is wondrous fun, but I don’t want to see these tweets appear in my feed.


Zappos introduces visual browsing feature

I've just noticed (via Twitter) an excellent new feature on Zappos.com, which provides a different way to browse through the retailer's ranges of shoes, watches and handbags.

Called Explore Zappos, it allows users to browse through the site by looking at a large number of items at once, and seems especially well suited to products like shoes and other fashion items.

Explore Zappos visual search