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Posts tagged with Fraud

Is Facebook doing enough to prevent fraudulent ads?

In recent years, Facebook has grown to be one of the most dominant players in online advertising, but when it comes to policing the ads it displays, is it asleep at the wheel?

An investigation by Justin Seitz, creator of investigation tool Hunchly, raises questions about just how hard Facebook is working to weed out bad ads.

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Former brand marketer: banner ads suck, but they're great

Fraud. Viewability. The demise of Flash.

The lowly banner ad is under attack and just about everybody agrees: banner ads are the past but not the future of advertising. But is everybody wrong?

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Five tips for using behavioural analytics to combat fraud

When we tell businesses that getting to know their customers is vital, it’s not just so that they can provide the best possible customer experience for them.

Getting to know your customers is most crucial when it comes to helping businesses identify enemies disguised as customers.

Fraud is becoming increasingly widespread since the dawn of ecommerce and as it becomes more and more sophisticated, we need greater visibility to fight malicious activity on our websites.

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Can PayPal win former customers back with "aggressive changes"?

Being the 800 pound gorilla of online payments isn't easy. Despite PayPal's ubiquity and the fact that it remains at the forefront of digital payments, including in the rapidly-evolving mobile payments space, the company's reputation is mixed.

Serving millions upon millions of customers isn't a walk in the park, and when something goes wrong with somebody's money, the world is bound to hear about it one way or another.

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Seizing the mobile payments opportunity

In a world that is increasingly mobile, today’s retailers must consider how they are addressing their consumers' desire to make purchases through m-commerce and how to combat fraud through these new routes to market.

So how much do retailers currently know about fraud rates on their mobile channels?

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Is the age of innocence over for the Mac?

If you own a Windows-based computer, it may be hard to believe that many of your Mac counterparts don't run antivirus software.

Viruses and malware are a fact of life for Windows owners, and as a result, there is a sizable ecosystem of security software vendors whose mission in life is to protect PC owners from the constantly growing number of threats.

But Mac owners may be getting a taste of the hassles PC owners have become accustomed to...

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Can Alibaba restore trust after fraud scandal?

Rebuilding trust with your customers isn't easy following a major crisis. Sadly, relationships that take years to build can be harmed or destroyed entirely practically overnight.

Alibaba, the Chinese business-to-business marketplace that Yahoo owns a substantial chunk of, is the latest company to learn that lesson the hard way.

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The dark side of Groupon emerges

When discussing Groupon, it's quite clear: the group buying business model is financially viable. For Groupon. What's less clear: whether Groupon's business model is financially viable for businesses.

One of the reasons it's not clear is that many -- if not most -- of the local business owners who have tried Groupon don't publicly reveal detailed results of their Groupon campaigns.

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Hackers turn iTunes into iFraud

Recently, authorities in the United States uncovered a scam in which criminals stole millions of dollars by making small charges to stolen credit cards. The average charge ranged from as little as 25 cents to no more than $9, which explains why 94% of the victims never noticed the charges.

If complaints that surfaced this past weekend are any indication, scammers with a similar model have set their sights on one of the world's most popular service for buying digital content: iTunes/the App Store.

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The White House unleashes AdWords against Wall Street

Imagine for a minute that you're the president of the United States and you're trying to make the case against Wall Street. What's the best way to do it? As the president, you have almost unlimited access to the traditional media, but that's not always enough today.

So U.S. president Barack Obama, whose use of the internet arguably helped him win the presidency, isn't relying on the mainstream media to promote his Wall Street reform agenda; he's using Google. And he's going straight for the jugular by bidding on topical keywords related to embattled investment bank Goldman Sachs.

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Consumers, spam and high-risk behavior

maawg studyTens of millions of consumers say they're aware of 'bots, yet they continue to interact with spam. Chalk it up to some sort of blissful, can't-happen-to-me oblivion.

The Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG) just completed a survey of North American and European consumers and found that despite their awareness of the dangers, they're playing with spam in ways that can leave them vulnerable to malware infections. Half had opened spam, clicked on a link in spam, opened a spam attachment, or replied or forwarded to spam. All these actions open the door to fraud, phishing, identity theft and infection.  Most consumers said they're aware  'bots exist, but only a third believe they're vulnerable to an infection.

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The domain name industry gets its Bernie Madoff

He may not have run a $50bn ponzi scheme but the domain name industry has found its Bernie Madoff. Yesterday, it was revealed that an employee of SnapNames, a popular domain name drop service and auctioneer, had been bidding on SnapNames domain name auctions, winning valuable domains, inflating auction prices and boosting revenue for the company in the process.

All told, the employee, who was an early member of the SnapNames team and a vice president at the company, is said to have participated in 5% of SnapNames' total auctions between 2005 and 2007 and that the value of his bidding accounted for 1% of SnapNames' revenue during that time.

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