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Posts tagged with Future

novel

Eight novels digital marketers will enjoy

There's no accounting for taste, but I often think it a bit of an anomaly that many of the world's incisive businessmen and women spend their spare time with their heads in books that look like they came from the self improvement aisle of an airport book shop.

I'm sure you know the business books I'm talking about - they have grandly ambiguous titles and include hyper-extended metaphors.

Perhaps these books are more useful than my blog posts, but I'd like to recommend some alternatives all the same.

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Bank Head Office Building

What's the future for big banks in a FinTech world?

There's a huge amount of hype flooding the web about new startup fintech companies and how they're going to change banking forever.

Could it be true? Are the days numbered for Britain's big four banking groups? Could they crush these upstarts before they get off the ground? Or is there a third way? 

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ebook

Paperback vs. ebook: the staging ground for a generational battle

The recent Hachette and Amazon standoff got me thinking again about the e-reader. 

Of all the transformations of physical media to digital, I can’t think of one that has rumbled on and divided audiences like the paperback to ebook. 

Arguably not CD to MP3, maybe because people could still burn CDs from iTunes (the move to subscription music was more gradual) whereas people can’t print their ebooks on a whim. 

Arguably calls to SMS to messaging apps, DVDs to streaming, physical games to computer games, these were easy transitions.

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pavlok

Smart cups & toothbrushes: Has the Internet of Things jumped the shark?

Everyone assumes that smart devices are going to be big.

They are undoubtedly fascinating. But nobody seems sure of exactly which consumer facing sectors are the ripest for, yes, you've guessed it, disruption.

There are many products in the market right now that may have a big impact. But here I present you with four products that show we're still a long way from understanding human need.

Quite simply, we don't know what we want until we're presented with it. That makes it very hard to design products that will change the world.

I might be wrong here. Please chide me in the comments.

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Five key trends and takeouts from Google I/O 2014

This year’s Google I/O conference, held weeks after Apple’s WWDC, showed the world that Google really is taking over every aspect of our lives, and challenging its fiercest rivals.

As Android users have increased from 530m last year to more than 1bn this year, Google announced its ‘biggest ever overhaul’ with a completely new set of Android products. 

Read on for my top five developments (plus a dose of healthy rivalry)...

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google logo

Seven big industries Google could disrupt

Google is making many companies nervous. Anything bought online that involves the collection of information naturally falls into Google's path.

Even outside of this large niche, Google is getting stuck into larger engineering projects like the self-driving car.

Let's take a look at industries ripe for disruption by Google.

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tom cruise in minority report

48 quotes from the Future of Digital Marketing

What does the future hold for digital marketing, ecommerce and retail?

That's the question the speakers at Econsultancy's Future of Digital Marketing conference try to answer every year.

Here are 48 quotes from 2014's event, ranging from wearables to China, digital transformation to user interfaces, retail to the smart home.

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What is the future of user-interface design?

Recently I’ve been building a few apps for fun in my spare time.

Doing so has got me thinking about various design elements, and where online design might be heading.

Currently flat design is ruling the roost, but it may not always be that way...

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1950 camera

The future of TV: five innovations to look out for

The box, the tube, the telly, the television. Are any of us sure the set is set to evolve?

The television is one of those unifying pleasures and most people are already happy with the experience of watching it.

Additionally, advertisers still think of television as the big hitting ad medium, rightly or wrongly. 

So, if it’s not broken, why fix it? Or is that the kind of reasoning that stymies innovation?

I think it’s fairly obvious that although we can choose to think of television as a constant, it has changed significantly since it went digital. FreeView in the UK, TiVo, Sky+, on-demand services like iPlayer and Netflix, Apple TV and Chromecast, the impact of Twitter and social TV, Roku, there have been many developments.

But what’s next? Here I’ve tried to sum up some of the innovations for advertisers and viewers I’ve seen in the last few months. See what you think..

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What we learned from trying Google Glass

Here at Econsultancy we try to write about Google Glass when we can, because we know it’s of great interest to marketers, and indeed the rest of humanity.

On Friday some of Econsultancy’s Content team tried Google Glass at Somo’s incredible gadget room in its London HQ, where they develop new tech uses for clients (thanks, Somo).

It was fun, but also revealing, so I thought I’d share some of what we saw and felt.

For the complete run down on Glass functions, you can visit Google’s help centre.

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12 things Google Glass will destroy (with 13 apps)

Google Glass for the majority is a long way off. In fact, if you go to the ‘MyGlass’ app page on Google Play, you’ll see, for those without Glass:

..there's a picture of a puppy in pyjamas. So not a total waste of time after all.

Puppies aside, Google professes Glass (like all G products) was built to break down barriers. The idea is to make things easier and more seamless; to free up hands and time.

Here at Econsultancy, the high-falutin’ Editorial team has some philosophical concerns. Our Head of Social, Matt, was quick to point out that Glass will essentially create a simulacrum of the world, a sort of 1:1 map that is neither real nor artifice (I direct you to Borges’ On Exactitude in Science).

Whilst we’re fans of Google, we’re sceptical about just what third party developers will come up with for Glass

There’s arguably never been such a product; a piece of hardware that fundamentally alters perception and interaction with the world. Even smartphones are a false precedent for Glass, but perhaps do offer a dirty window on our increased device reliance (dare I smush these words together and create ‘deviance’?).

Even with well-intentioned developers, might third party apps add unwanted lustre to our already homogenous cityscapes?

In this post I make some philosophical predictions, as seen through some nascent apps. Of course, it’s a lot more fun to cast concerns with a negative spin; forgive the hack approach!

Here’s what Google Glass will destroy…..

19 comments
Future Of Digital Marketing Malaysia

Eight highlights from the Future Of Digital Marketing Malaysia

For the first time in Asia, the great and the good of the Malaysian and APAC digital marketing community gathered in Kuala Lumpur recently for the inaugral Future Of Digital Marketing (FODM) Malaysia conference.

Attended by over 400 delegates, and organised in conjunction with the Association of Accredited Advertising Agents Malaysia and Multimedia Development Corp (MDeC), the event saw eight talks.

The talks echoed a key theme articulated by MDeC chief executive officer Datuk Badlisham Ghazali, that "the next wave of economic growth will come from the knowledge-based economy, with digital technology as a key driver of progress”.

Here are just some of the highlights from an excellent conference.

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