Posts tagged with Google Glass

What brands need to know about Snapchat Spectacles

Snapchat is getting into the hardware game.

On Friday, the company unveiled Spectacles, a pair of sunglasses that comes equipped with a video camera that records clips, or Snaps, of up to 10 seconds.


Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality: where should brands focus?

Augmented reality and virtual reality are the source of growing buzz.

For brands interested in exploring them, which is the more worthy technology?


Seven big opportunities that wearables offer to marketers

Wearables are widely forecast to follow smartphones as the next major technology trend and there has been a huge amount of hype around products like Google Glass and the Apple Watch.

As the technology is still in its infancy the opportunities for marketers have been limited so far, but as always with disruptive technologies it’s those who take risks and act first that will likely reap the biggest rewards.


Five key trends and takeouts from Google I/O 2014

This year’s Google I/O conference, held weeks after Apple’s WWDC, showed the world that Google really is taking over every aspect of our lives, and challenging its fiercest rivals.

As Android users have increased from 530m last year to more than 1bn this year, Google announced its ‘biggest ever overhaul’ with a completely new set of Android products. 

Read on for my top five developments (plus a dose of healthy rivalry)...

Augmented reality

When can I buy Google Glass?

Last year, the Econsultancy blog featured several articles about Google Glass, as did most digital and business blogs, cognisant of the technology's hold on the public's imagination.

I rounded up a collection of apps and postulated as to what affect they might have on society. A few of our Editorial team got to try Glass, too (courtesy of Somo).

This year, Glass still has us rapt. CES unveiled some third parties' intentions for Glass and a wide variety of wearables were debuted, showing the trend is not abating. Elsewhere, most national news outlets' covered the failed citation against a Californian woman caught driving whilst wearing Glass (there was no evidence the device was switched on).

As the internet has become widely used globally and consumers are now very comfortable using the web for a variety of functions, the idea of connected devices has started to feel less alien, too. The internet of things, particularly the connected home also made more noise at CES this year.

So I thought it was time for a 'where are we at?' style post, to look at the latest iterations of third party Google Glass apps, new developments from Google itself and even perhaps to predict when we'll actually see people using Glass, outside of Silicon Valley.


13 things I learnt about the interweb last year

Let me tell you, it's more than just the excellent doge.

Last year I started writing for the Econsultancy blog and it’s allowed me to go to a lot of cool conferences and learn about some new things, from Google Glass to big automated email and CRM systems.

Here are some of the things that stuck in my mind from last year and perhaps a few things you might not know about digital and the interweb.

For regular followers of our interweb anti-format post (crazy stuff from across the web), don’t worry, it will return next week.


Can Google Glass help retailers?

It's difficult to believe that the iPad only launched three years ago. Everyone knew a naysayer: 'Why do I need it? I have a laptop, I have a mobile – the iPad is just a gimmick somewhere in between'.

There's a heavy sense of deja vu with Google Glass. The naysayers of the world once again unite to knock a device before it has even had time to get off the ground.

Perhaps they will be proved correct or, as with the iPad, the naysayers will eat their words and Google Glass will become the new must have device.


What we learned from trying Google Glass

Here at Econsultancy we try to write about Google Glass when we can, because we know it’s of great interest to marketers, and indeed the rest of humanity.

On Friday some of Econsultancy’s Content team tried Google Glass at Somo’s incredible gadget room in its London HQ, where they develop new tech uses for clients (thanks, Somo).

It was fun, but also revealing, so I thought I’d share some of what we saw and felt.

For the complete run down on Glass functions, you can visit Google’s help centre.


12 things Google Glass will destroy (with 13 apps)

Google Glass for the majority is a long way off. In fact, if you go to the ‘MyGlass’ app page on Google Play, you’ll see, for those without Glass:

..there's a picture of a puppy in pyjamas. So not a total waste of time after all.

Puppies aside, Google professes Glass (like all G products) was built to break down barriers. The idea is to make things easier and more seamless; to free up hands and time.

Here at Econsultancy, the high-falutin’ Editorial team has some philosophical concerns. Our Head of Social, Matt, was quick to point out that Glass will essentially create a simulacrum of the world, a sort of 1:1 map that is neither real nor artifice (I direct you to Borges’ On Exactitude in Science).

Whilst we’re fans of Google, we’re sceptical about just what third party developers will come up with for Glass

There’s arguably never been such a product; a piece of hardware that fundamentally alters perception and interaction with the world. Even smartphones are a false precedent for Glass, but perhaps do offer a dirty window on our increased device reliance (dare I smush these words together and create ‘deviance’?).

Even with well-intentioned developers, might third party apps add unwanted lustre to our already homogenous cityscapes?

In this post I make some philosophical predictions, as seen through some nascent apps. Of course, it’s a lot more fun to cast concerns with a negative spin; forgive the hack approach!

Here’s what Google Glass will destroy…..


Will Google Glass be good for ecommerce?

Google Glass, if you haven’t heard much about it yet, is a wearable computer that looks like a pair of futuristic sunglasses.

You can use it like your smartphone to get directions, check flight information or any other task that you might ask a computer to do.

While some hail it as being the device of the future, I wonder what the purpose of it is, and whether it is a good new opportunity for ecommerce.