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Posts tagged with Matt Cutts

Google: expect a Caffeine jolt after the holidays

Google's Caffeine update is coming. Billed by Google as "the first step in a process that will let us push the envelope on size, indexing speed, accuracy, comprehensiveness and other dimensions", Caffeine is not your regular Google update.

When Caffeine was announced, Google did something it had never done before: it offered up a sandbox so that the public could preview search results with Caffeine and provide Google with feedback. While that sandbox is no longer available, you won't have to wait long for your Caffeine jolt: according to Google's Matt Cutts, Caffeine is coming after the holidays.

5 comments

How will your site rank with Google Caffeine?

When Google updates, SEOs around the world hold their breath. For websites that rely heavily on their Google SERPs for traffic, an algorithm change can sometimes mean the difference between profitability and the poorhouse.

Google's newest update, named Caffeine, is by all appearances more than just a regular update. Google describes it as a "next-generation architecture for Google's web search".

8 comments

PageRank sculpting: Google's Matt Cutts tells all

Earlier this month, I wrote about reports that Google's Matt Cutts had essentially told an audience at the SMX Advanced conference that PageRank sculpting was a worthless exercise.

In a new post on his blog, Cutts provides some much-needed clarification.

1 comment

Don't get pulled over by the Google Patrol

It's late at night and you're driving along the highway in your brand new Rolls Royce Phantom that sports the license plate 'BEST SEO'. All of a sudden you see the flashing lights behind you. You were driving the limit. You know you were obeying the rules of the road. What gives?

You've just been pulled over by the Google Patrol and it's pretty obvious that you aren't guilty of anything other than being a high-profile SEO.

4 comments

Google changes the game on PageRank sculpting, starts following JavaScript links

At the SMX Advanced conference in Seattle this week, Google's Matt Cutts revealed that Google has implemented two changes that may have an impact on your SEO efforts.

The first one has to do with the way Google deals with PageRank sculpting and the second has to do with Google's following of JavaScript links.

4 comments

How many links are too many?

What's the maximum number of links you should include on a single page? 3, 10, 100?

Let's say you want to build a comprehensive list of the UK charities using Twitter, for instance. There are a lot of links and as the list grows, you just might find yourself with more than 100.

6 comments

When is a paid link not a paid link?

Google has a major problem relating the identification of paid links, but I believe it has an even bigger problem relating to the definition of 'paid links', and the very term itself.

Econsultancy’s Patricio Robles wrote about this earlier today so I don’t want to cover too much old ground, but I do want to comment on the difference – or similarity – between paid and commercial links.

12 comments

Google lays the smack down on 'sponsored conversations'

I've discussed the nofollow attribute several times lately.

The bottom line: Google doesn't like paid links and regardless of whether or not one agrees with Google's stance, the use of nofollow with paid links is a best practice worth implementing.

18 comments

John Dvorak doesn't get SEO, but knows how to linkbait

For most of us, SEO is not some pie-in-the-sky theory that may or not be real. We use it. And we know it works because we see and measure the results.

While SEO isn't the be-all and end-all of online marketing, helping search engines find your content and better understand what it's about can be a crucial part of making sure that internet users find your content. At the end of the day, that's really what SEO is about.

Try telling that to John Dvorak, aka Mr Anti-SEO.

20 comments