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Posts tagged with Microcopy

How ecommerce sites can use microcopy

Microcopy is often overlooked, but it can have an important impact on the user experience. 

In an ecommerce context, microcopy is those little pieces of text which explain what to write in a form field, or the wording of a call to action. 

Here are some examples of how it can be used...

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micro machines

Six brilliant bits of micro-copy you can implement today

Microcopy is one of those things that is hard to define (how does it differ from regular or maxicopy?) but you know it when you see it.

There's a loyal following of UX bods behind these kind of microinteractions and how they can be enhanced with little pieces of finely judged copywriting.

I've written about it before (see previous post on micro-copywriting), but thought I should thrown down some of the finest examples of this fine art.

These are bits of copy most websites could implement somewhere, and without precluding the need for testing, I'm sure they will improve performance.

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Whoopsy daisy log-ins: a further look at good and bad micro-copywriting

I wrote a piece about micro-copywriting earlier this year, and in my ignorance thought this was a new concept, and that I may even have coined the term.

Shows you what I know. It’s a term that’s been used for a number of years, and great examples have been collected already, e.g. this Flickr Microcopy Group (thanks to Doug Kessler for pointing to this).

As the last post was popular I thought I’d bring together some more examples. So here’s a look at some micro-copy from the log-in error messages of four big players in the tech world.

These were easy to collect as I didn’t have to remember my passwords. In the end I found that although this could be an area where it’s not worth trifling with a user’s frustration, there’s still a lot to be improved upon.

And although looking at some of these fine-grained areas could be seen as the pedantry of a dilettante, I like to think of these little things as a microcosm of brand identity.

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