{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Native Advertising

sponsored content stats

10 internet marketing statistics we've discussed this week

We've got so many beautiful stats for you this week.

From native advertising to online TV, paid search spend to site search conversion, social media in travel to banking online. Please enjoy and share at will.

For more online marketing statistics, download our Internet Statistics Compendium...

2 comments
buzzfeed articles

Should the phrase 'native advertising' be retired?

Native advertising can cause a bit of a headache. The IAB is yet to offer a definition of the phrase, which is being used in a rather flexible manner by many ad networks.

The Guardian and BuzzFeed are two prominent examples of publishers that refer to 'sponsored' or 'promoted' content. This seems a lot less ambiguous and may clear up some of the confusion for those trying to make sense of the topic.

Whilst I think this type of advertising is here to stay (when done properly), I'm not sure that native advertising is the best term for it. In fact, I think it would benefit from being split into three terms that make greater sense of the issue.

Here's why...

For an overview of native advertising see the Econsultancy report, Native Advertising: What it means for brands and publishers.

2 comments

Native advertising: the Guardian Labs way

Guardian Labs began in early 2014 with its aim to work with clients to create sponsored content opportunities.

This is a trend in publishing with BuzzFeed and The Telegraph (and more besides) experimenting with in-house content creation tailored for brands.

The Guardian is seeking to rise above some of the disquiet around native advertising (is it a case of the emperor's new clothes?) by simply creating transparent sponsored content to a great standard.

Anna Watkins, who heads up Guardian Labs, was speaking at the IAB's Content Conference and this is what I took from her talk.

For a full intro to native advertising see the new Econsultancy report, Native Advertising: What it means for brands and publishers.

3 comments
emperor

Native advertising: The emperor's new clothes?

Great native advertising cannot be automated.

To think about selling on a CPM basis and defining native advertising as simply a question of format, rather than content, is wrong.

The value of a native ad campaign resides in the quality of the content, therefore the engagement with the piece - and that's more than just a click, it's time on page and a share count (and potentially an associated action).

At the IAB Content Conference, I listened to a number of speakers with interesting angles on native advertising.

Here I'll share Nick Bradley's (Northern & Shell) healthily sceptical view of native, including (more positively) some examples of native advertising done well.

For a full intro to native advertising see the new Econsultancy report, Native Advertising: What it means for brands and publishers.

4 comments

Why is MINI's social strategy so immense?

I was going to call this ‘why MINI’s social media strategy is maximum fun’ but as soon as you describe something as ‘fun’ it kind of stops being that.

Which certainly isn’t the fate that the 55 year-old automobile brand deserves. Its social media campaigns are huge amounts of… might have to dust off the old thesaurus for this one… lively hoopla?

Fine. Fun it is. MINI’s social campaigns contain some of the most playfully engaging, dizzyingly inventive and delightfully gratifying fun you’ll experience from a brand today.

Ford has an excellent social media strategy full of humour and creativity, now imagine how much fun a brand that’s half its age (and size) can have.

5 comments
Native advertising world cup

What native advertising can learn from the World Cup

The World Cup in Brazil has created an online buzz;. Swathes of content have outpoured online and social media activity has been off the scale.

While England, Spain and Italy will be licking their wounds and flying home in disappointment, we take a look at what comparisons can be drawn between native advertising and the sporting event of the year.

2 comments
Viagra alternative advertorial

Native advertising: will there be a reader revolt?

Search for native advertising on the Guardian and you'll likely find this article.

The irony is almost unbearable. As Doug Kessler pointed out at FODM 2014 (all credit goes to Doug), he didn't find the Guardian's point of view on native advertising. He found this article in a paid-for position.

What does this mean for publishing and advertising? Keep reading and you'll find my rules for succeeding with native advertising.

1 comment
unilever logo

Advertising trends: Unilever is out in front

Ashley Friedlein, Econsultancy CEO, kicked off 2014 by pointing to six trends of note in advertising.

These were real-time bidding, native advertising, video advertising, targeting, localised and geo-targeting, and mobile advertising.

Unilever is a company that continues to innovate in advertising. Let’s look at how.

0 comments
Q

Quartz: what's so great about it?

What’s so great about Quartz?

Quartz is a business news publication that's been talked about a lot since its founding, by Atlantic Media Company (publishes The Atlantic), in 2012.

It's built on WordPress, is mobile-first and characterised by a strong team of journalists that produces engaging short and long content that's incredibly sharable.

Here's some more answers to the question 'what's so great about Quartz?'

6 comments
buzzfeed

The BuzzFeed way: examples of shareable native advertising

BuzzFeed is successful in anyone’s book when it comes to creating content their audience wants to consume wherever they are and then share with their friends.

I listened to Will Hayward, VP Europe, BuzzFeed, at the Adobe Summit EMEA 2014. He was talking about how traditional display advertising is still inefficient and how new methods of social distribution of native content are worki.ng for BuzzFeed.

Here I’ve attempted to sum up some of Will’s thoughts.

0 comments
stars and stripes

10 US digital marketing statistics we've seen this week

Here's the latest US stats we've seen around the web.

Intrigue is provided by native advertising, Alibaba hype, Twitter ads, newspapers and our obsession with our phones.

Get stuck in. And make sure you take a look at the Econsultancy Internet Statistics Compendium for more stats.

1 comment

Five uncomfortable truths about native advertising

Anyone involved in digital marketing will be acutely aware of native advertising’s meteoric ascendance over the past year or so.

According to Hexagram’s 2013 research, 62% of publishers are currently offering native advertising opportunities, followed by 41% of brands and 34% of agencies.

Furthermore, 66% of brands say they create their own content for native ads and the most popular forms of native advertising are blog posts, accounting for 65%, with articles at 63% and Facebook at 56%.

Native advertising presents a hugely exciting opportunity for brands to access new (and qualified) audiences that - through continual exposure to brand content - are increasingly likely to ‘convert’.

Furthermore, it is hoped native advertising will become digital advertising’s great saviour - particularly as the efficacy of online banner ads occupying similar spaces continues to diminish.

That said as the collective euphoria around native advertising grows, so too will the demands from brand CMOs that it be measurable, sustainable and profitable.

To that effect, all of us involved in the content marketing/native advertising space (whether you’re a technology-provider, as well, or a publisher or a content creator), would do well to start tackling these uncomfortable truths about our industry head-on:

0 comments