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Posts tagged with Navigation

mega menu

Mega-menu design trends in ecommerce: 2014 vs 2016

Mega-menus are a mainstay of desktop ecommerce.

Five years ago, we published a post dissecting 26 of these menus, back when they were relatively novel.

In 2014, we revisited the topic, seeing that full-width menus with a greater number of products and featured images were en vogue.

So, what of 2016? Let's have a look.

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shazop

Shazop review: designer comparison site is clunky on mobile

Shazop is a new service aggregating designer fashion products and allowing consumers to find the best prices online.

The proposition is fantastic but there's a little work to do before the mobile experience is silky smooth.

Here's the full website review.

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11 unusual examples of ecommerce navigation

Celebrating the weird, the different and the atypical.

Sure we have a set few ideas about user experience and what we consider best practice, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for experimentation.

The following examples offer a different view, whether it’s in their search tools or in the way they present their products.

Some of the following are perhaps better in principle rather than execution, and none of them should be considered as anything more than ‘interesting’, however you may just find some inspiration here…

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10 sneaky examples of hidden website menus

It's becoming more popular for websites to hide its navigation off screen, only revealing a menu when you interact with an element.

The interaction can be a click or a hover, the element is normally a hamburger menu, but occasionally its text or symbol based. Either way this practice is a good way to clean up the clutter of your website.

Here are 10 examples, each providing a slightly different take on the trend.

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How John Lewis, M&S and Debenhams handle on-site search

Not wishing to sound too astoundingly obvious right off the bat, but your on-site search tool is a key way in which visitors look for products on your website, especially if you carry a huge range of items. 

The surprising thing is how easy it is to get on-onsite search wrong: bad placement, lack of auto-suggest, poorly displayed search results, and so on. 

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image courtesy of Steven Lewis

11 compact examples of super-navigation

We published our 17 crucial web design trends for 2015 a couple of weeks ago, and this is part of a series of posts looking at each trend in more depth.

This week, the thin permanent menus found across the very top of larger websites we have decided to call 'super-navigation'.

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Five ways to adapt your travel website to make holidaymakers happy

With 71% of customers expecting assistance when stuck within five minutes, high rates of abandonment, and a diverse range of platforms from which customers can speak, it has never been more important to listen to the voice of your customer.

Indeed, we have collected nearly 1.5m handwritten nuggets of information from almost 400 sites.

So, what niggles the modern day holiday maker? What prevents them from converting? And, most importantly, what can you do to keep them from journeying away from your site and into the arms of your competitor?

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sports direct logo

Sports Direct: check out those calls to action!

Sports Direct is brilliant. Ok, it had some problems last year as its reputation took a blow thanks to the retailer’s use of zero hour contracts, but on the sales front, it’s flying along.

New stores are opening, other sports retailers are being battered into submission and 2,000 staff members are to receive a cool £100k bonus after profits climbed by 40% to £200m last year.

With 12 languages and 10 currency options, the Sports Direct website should continue to aid the company's growing profits.

The website has been praised in many quarters. It’s certainly easy to use and strongly conveys the brand’s identity.

Visiting the site I was struck by just how good its calls to action are, and how easy it is to get around (unlike their stores). I thought I’d round up a few of the best bits.

Enjoy them in all their enormous garish glory. I think they’re part of a growing lust for simplicity that is driving web design forward.

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Which ecommerce sites are getting it right? Here's 21 of the best...

Which ecommerce sites are setting a great example for others to follow?  

I've been asking the Econsultancy blog team, as well as a few ecommerce experts, for their suggestions of great ecommerce sites. 

I've picked the rest, some because they offer an excellent all round experience, others aren't perfect, but were chosen for specific aspects which others can copy/learn from....

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A bold new website design for Fat Face: does it work?

Outdoor clothing retailer Fat Face recently relaunched its ecommerce site. Thanks to some interesting design features, I thought the site was worth reviewing. 

These features include persistent filtered navigation, a novel idea, and light boxes for product pages.  

So will these features work for Fat Face? Let's take a closer look....

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Colston Hall

Reflections on building a new arts website

This week, we’ve been singing the praises of Colston Hall’s new website (it’s a concert hall in Bristol, England).

We’re not going to gush any more, but we thought our readership might be interested to hear from agency and client, as to the process of redesign. What were the hopes, fears, successes, failures? How did the tender process go down? What happens next?

Attempting to answer some of these questions, I’ve been talking to Carly Heath, Marketing and Press Officer at Colston Hall, and Graeme Swinton, Creative Director at Palace.

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Who'd've thunk it? Colston Hall: a delicious, flagship website for the arts

Every so often, whether you work in digital or not, one visits a website and gets a slap across the face. One dawdles for a moment, scrolling around and wondering how web design has come so far in such a short period of time.

Colston Hall is one of these websites. OK, it’s a fairly sizeable concert hall in Bristol, England, but still, it’s in the arts sector, this isn’t meant to be so slick, right?

Cecile Eschenauer kindly pointed us to Colston Hall’s website, designed by Palace, after reading Chris Lake’s article on colour and UIs.

Looking at comparable venues (e.g. York Barbican, Newcastle’s Metro Arena) Colston Hall is way ahead, it’s in the future. Other small and medium arts spaces are going to have to catch up, or miss out on maximising ticket sales.

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