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Posts tagged with New Media

Tomorrow's news companies: small, lean and venture capitalist

Future news organisations, the ones that make it out of the recession, will look much different than pre-recession times. They'll be smaller and leaner. But if they're smart, they'll also have a big role in VC for companies developing products that could help them gain a competitive advantage.

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Q&A: Broadersheet.com CEO Peter Clark

Earlier today I wrote about whether a news aggregator could be a success in the UK. Prospects are not good, and even Briton Nick Denton, founder of Gawker.com, says he wouldn't dare do it.

However, despite the pessimism, there exists an interest in giving it a try. The first major entrant into the UK news aggregation scene looks to be Cambridge-based Broadersheet.com.

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Aggregation in the UK: Can it work?

Americans and the British are quite similar, but also quite different. Jokes that make Americans laugh may not make a British person laugh; food that a Brit might love could repulse an American; and so on. It seems the way the two nations consume news online is different, too.

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The next newspaper crisis: shoddy website design

Since the floor has fallen out of print circulations at many newspapers, editors are paying greater attention to the layout of their web sites. What they're finding isn't pretty.

For years if a newspaper had a website, it most likely served as a digital dumping ground for the print product. Design and functionality wasn't a key concern because most readers still got their news in print. Times have changed, but unfortunately many newspapers remain unprepared.

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Teens, media and why you shouldn't believe the hype

True or false: today's teens are prolific multitaskers and you're more likely to find them texting away and social networking than you are to find them watching television or listening to the radio.

Chances are that if you've been paying attention to the media and analysts, you're answering 'true'. Unfortunately you'd be wrong according to a new report issued by Nielsen called 'How Teens Use Media'.

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#IranElection and #CNNFail: lacking #context

Twitter's utility as a means to share breaking news is not new. Its track record includes the bombings in Mubai and the landing of US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River.

Over the weekend, Twitter became a hotbed for reporting and discussion of the contentious presidential election in Iran.

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HuffPo founder: subscription business model is for porn only

Arianna Huffington, founder of The Huffington Post, is a poster child for 'new media'. But a poster child does not an expert make.

On stage at AllThingsDigital's D7 conference, she made one of the most ill-informed comments I've heard in a while: subscriptions are only a good idea for porn sites.

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Missing the point in the debate about the future of journalism

The debate over the future of journalism is only getting more heated as some of the most storied newspaper companies sink deeper and deeper into financial distress.

Recently, there has been a noticeable shift in the debate: some are now calling for government intervention. And they're serious about it.

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The cost of content: pick your poison

Content may be king but many companies have found that producing and distributing quality content requires a royal bank account.

The plight of the newspaper industry is a good example: news hasn't gone out of style but, for many newspapers, the cost structures associated with producing the news is incompatible with today's market. Costs simply exceed revenues.

3 comments