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Posts tagged with No Sql

Five legitimate use cases for NoSQL databases

NoSQL may be one of the most overhyped technology trends in the past couple of years, and a growing number of companies that left their relational databases behind for a NoSQL fling are rethinking their decisions.

Yet organizations continue to adopt NoSQL solutions and investors are still eager to pour money into vendors behind the most popular of them.

Are they crazy, or has some of the NoSQL skepticism been overdone?

The truth of the matter is that, hype aside, there is a role for NoSQL solutions to play in a world consumed by data, and increasingly companies are making smart decisions about when to use relational databases and when to turn to their NoSQL cousins.


The biggest tech mistakes startups make and how to avoid them

Everybody loves a successful startup, but even the most successful startups generally overcome plenty of mistakes before they become successful. Unfortunately, for many young companies that don't win in the marketplace, failure is the product of fatal mistakes.

Like most things in life, mistakes aren't created equal, and when it comes to the mistakes that can really hurt a young startup, technology mistakes can be particularly pernicious.

Here are several of the biggest technology mistakes startups make and how they can be avoided.


NoSQL database provider 10gen raises $42m

The relational database may not be dead, and so-called NoSQL solutions may have been slightly overhyped, but that isn't stopping investors from betting that the market for new types of data stores is going to be very, very big.

The latest example of that: 10gen, which is behind one of the more prominent NoSQL databases, MongoDB, has just raised a new $42m round of funding.


Are more companies going to be saying 'no' to NoSQL?

NoSQL has been one of the biggest technology trends of the past couple of years.

The rise of 'big data' and the growing number of solutions that promise to eliminate some of the long-standing headaches relational databases often create have given many companies, particularly start-ups, good reason to NoSQL databases.

But at least some of them are finding out that NoSQL isn't the database market's version of penicillin.


Has NoSQL been overhyped?

One of the biggest technology buzzwords to emerge in the past several years is 'NoSQL.' Put simply, NoSQL has come to refer to any database management system that isn't a traditional RDBMB.

From Cassandra to CouchDB, there are a number of NoSQL systems that have attracted significant attention, and that are used in commercial applications, including some of the most popular consumer internet services.

But the honeymoon with NoSQL may be coming to an end.


NoSQL for the rest of us

NoSQL is fast becoming one of the trendiest tech buzzwords, and that means one thing: geek fights!

The relational database may not be dead, but there are legitimate debates about NoSQL alternatives to popular RDBMSes like MySQL, MS SQL Server and Oracle.

For most companies, however, such debates may seem too technical and abstract to be of any importance. But that doesn't mean that the NoSQL 'movement' should be ignored.


Five open-source NoSQL technologies worth looking at

The relational database is dead. Okay, that may be a stretch, but thanks in large part to the demands of massively-popular consumer internet services and sophisticated enterprise applications alike, more and more developers are finding that, for certain applications, moving away from relational databases is not only desirable, but practically necessary.

One of the biggest benefits of 'NoSQL' solutions is that many do away with schema. In other words, developers don't need to define a rigid structure for data, as they do with relational databases. When dealing with certain kinds of data, this is ideal. Additionally, for some applications, relational databases have less-than-stellar performance and can be very difficult and expensive to scale.


Are relational databases a thing of the past? Not quite

The web is literally built on databases. The majority of your favorite websites are probably driven by one or more relational databases.

But there's a "movement" afoot. Its goal: provide a superior alternative to popular RDBMSs like MySQL and Microsoft SQL Server.