Posts tagged with On Demand

What does the WWE Network mean for the future of sports television?

The WWE may have won the heavyweight title for breaking the internet at CES 2014 by announcing the launch of the WWE Network.

I have previously touched upon how WWE has embraced digital transformation, but the launch of its 24/7 streaming service, which will be showing Wrestlemania 30 as its first pay-per-view in April, takes things to a whole new level.

In case you somehow missed the announcement that drove the WWE Universe into a frenzy, here is everything you need to know about the WWE Network.

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Sky finally launches its internet TV service, NOW TV

In January, Sky announced that it would be launching a new online TV service later this year. Designed in large part to allow non-Sky customers to access Sky content, the service would allow its subscribers to access a variety of content, including movies and sports, on a pay-as-you-go basis.

Right on schedule, Sky today announced that the service, dubbed NOW TV, will be launching tomorrow.

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The five Cs of connected TV

Connected TV Smart PackWhen two very different industries like traditional broadcast television and digital collide, it’s difficult to ignore the implications on both sides.

While analysts predict that 60% of households will be watching internet TV by 2014 and many companies are trying to capitalise on shifting viewing habits, the connected TV market is still in a nascent stage.

To coincide with the recent release of Econsultancy’s Connected TV Smart Pack, we’ve identified five key elements of this emerging ecosystem that any marketer needs to be aware of.  

These are what we call the five Cs of connected TV...

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Google's content strategy comes together for Google TV

When Google TV was first announced, I wrote that it "might be one of the most important things the company has attempted." If successful, Google would do nothing less than realize the dream of television-web convergence.

But I also noted that execution was key, and there was no shortage of skeptics who questioned whether Google would be able to put it all together.

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