{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Persuasion

couch potato

Maximizing conversion with micro persuasion

“It's the little details that are vital. Little things make big things happen.” John Wooden

I am a big fan of the micro-conversion vs. macro-conversion discussion (go team micro!). Coming from a behavioral science angle to take up conversion challenges I would like to start the micro persuasion vs. macro persuasion discussion as well.

Marketers often have too ambitious persuasion goals to really be effective. Behavioral scientists are trained to start with micro goals when they aim for macro goals.

When you want to motivate someone to exercise regularly, a first push up is a great start! The same goes when you want to sell products.


Why marketers should focus on persuadables

Persuasion is a hot topic. But do you also know which of your customers you can persuade?

I recently talked to one of the leading figures in Data Science, Eric Siegel, author of Predictive Analytics. And he concludes that organizations in essence don’t just want to know what consumers will do – they want to know what they can do about it.

I never really thought about it that way, but it makes sense right?

It turns out that it's not that interesting to know what customers will do. Knowing a customer will click, or doesn't click, will move left or move right, isn't useful data. The key is to know which of your customers you can persuade to behave the way you want them to.

By focusing on persuadables marketers can achieve better results. Next to that, it could just help improve marketing's reputation.


The history of personalisation

Personalisation in retail is often seen as the latest development in online marketing but the practice itself is as old as the concept of retail.  

From the time of the earliest shopkeepers, good retailers would recognise their customer and tailor their pitch according to what they knew about them. 


Using emotional intelligence to optimise conversion rates

Each search query typed into Google delivers page upon page of worthy results, firing users off to several million more websites on a daily basis for all their needs, from research to idle browsing and shopping.

Even in niche markets it is becoming increasingly difficult for online retailers to retain and interest their target users on their website itself in a market where competition is intense.

The practice of making your web page a compelling place to be and crucially, give customers what they want in a matter of seconds, is known as conversion optimisation: making the most out of the people who come to your site and turning them into customers.

So what are the tried and tested ways of standing out from the crowd? What do you need to pay attention to when building and designing a website? Here are my top five considerations for creating a compelling – and successful website – to bring home the leads.


Beyond the hype: big behavioural data

Although almost no one can tell you when data is "big" or not, we all want do “something” with big data.

But collecting terabytes of data doesn’t guarantee we will also use the available data very useful. Three recent trends begin to change the status quo.

Methods for analysing big data have improved, so we are better able to focus on the important data and ultimately make a shift from analytics to actual actions.

1 comment

Digital seduction: why customers buy your product

Economists at some point decided that consumers make informed product purchases: A good balance between price and quality.

For decades, however, this view is falling apart, as consumers’ decisions are not rational. In my opinion this explains the differences in conversion between online and offline stores.

1 comment

They changed the rules of online marketing without even notifying us

A colleague of mine, Arjan (@arjanharing), is a great table tennis player. And when I say great, I mean great: I have witnessed a table tennis tournament in our offices during a BBQ with over a 100 people, and nobody – repeat nobody – was able to return his service. 

Now, I must admit that his service is definitely his main strength in the game. I mean, he is a good player, but the exceptional service makes him a player who is hard to compete with even for the well trained and the profs.  

But recently, “they”, the people who run the table tennis rules, decided to change the rules of the game. 

The change might seem minor to you and me (assuming here that you are, like me, not a trained table tennis player): they changed the way in which you are allowed to hold your hand when throwing the ball into the air to serve.

When I heard about it—and tried it—I could not really tell the difference. However, to Arjan, a trained expert, the little change of rules made him loose his extraordinary skills. A drop from exceptional to mediocre, by a little change of the rules. 

Now, why would you care about changes in the rules of table tennis? Well, that’s because the emotions that overwhelmed Arjan when notified of the change share lots of similarities with the emotions that are overwhelming internet marketers all around the world: “They” are changing the rules of the game.

The male brain - potentially

Eight online shopping behaviour traits of men

Like Johnny Depp was once quoted as saying, I’m fascinated by human behaviour, by what’s underneath the surface, by the words inside people.

By spending considerable time with people using different websites in both their natural and controlled research environments, I’m able to cater for this satisfaction.

As a follow up to my nine women x nine hours = nine usability insights article, I am sharing some of the most prevalent behavioural traits of men when shopping online.

There will always be some differences and many of these have been observed with female consumers, but this list is very much up-to-date and representative of the male population.

If men are part of your target audience, which of the behaviours traits are you triggering or avoiding to persuade them to buy from you?

E-commerce persuasion techniques

Nine valuable techniques to persuade visitors to buy in 2012

More and more of our time is spent helping our clients not only make their online experiences more usable but developing a persuasion strategy that will run through their online customer journey.

In order for us to be able to develop these persuasive strategies, the majority of our time is spent one-to-one with consumers, understanding what motivates them, observing their online behaviour and understanding how they are influenced to buy online with one retailer over another.

With all this in mind, as a follow up to my previous article, Nine women x nine hours = nine usability insights, this article details an up-to-date list of nine of the most influential persuasive techniques, in no particular order, that retailers are using to encourage visitors to buy in 2012.

Lings Cars

Lings Cars and the art of persuading visitors to buy

Now and again you see a website so different to the norm that you can’t help but be intrigued. Lings Cars reverses perfectly in to that space.

The easy option here would be for me give the site a good going over with a usability stick, but I wouldn’t be the first to do that and quite frankly I don’t want to have Ling Valentine breathing now my neck and boxing me into submission....

Instead, what I want to hopefully do in this article is identify a wide range of persuasive, psychologically rooted design techniques that this website uses to a) build trust and then b) encourage you to hire.

Stay with me on this, I know when you first see the site you may well have a WTF moment and wonder how anyone would/could find their way around the site, but if you don’t know already Ling shifts quite a few cars over the course of the year: £35m in 2010 in fact.

Booking.com persuasive design elements

Booking.com: improving conversion with best practice persuasive design

Persuasive design is something that has been around for many many years, not least in the way high street stores and supermarkets lay out their stores to encourage and entice customers to buy as they arrive and walk around.

In the online world, PET (persuasion, emotion, trust) is an approach that was pioneered by Human Factors International, and alongside usability and user experience, designing with persuasion in mind is an extremely powerful approach to positively impact on conversion rates.

In my experience, one site which has persuasion rooted in its design, content and layout is Booking.com.  

In this article I provide a breakdown of some of the key persuasive elements that booking.com deliver.


Psychographic targeting in B2B marketing

There are so many ways to segment an audience and target your messages – by job title, industry, seniority, behaviour... But there's an important dimension that's often ignored by B2B marketers: psychographics.

How different prospects feel about things can guide your segmentation, offers and creative. The trick is to find ways to get your psychographic targets to identify themselves so you can market to their specific biases.