{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Publishers

Facebook more profitable than Amazon. Who cares?

Facebook's revenue growth over the past several years is almost as impressive as its user growth. And with money pouring in, thanks in large part to advertisers eager to reach consumers on the world's largest social network, its profits are growing. How much?

According to Michael Arrington, Facebook generated nearly $800m in operating income in the first six months of this year.

By comparison, Arrington's sources said the company produced $1bn in operating income in all of last year.


Google targets undesirable pagination

Pagination, the breaking up of content across multiple pages, is a common practice and in many cases, a product of good design.

After all, there are plenty of cases where pagination creates a more pleasurable, higher-performing user experience.

But pagination isn't always desirable. Some sites, for instance, employ pagination in a questionable attempt to boost page views, and thus ad impressions.


Is computer-generated content better than content farm content?

Content farming may be a big business, but that doesn't mean that companies in the business of content farming are particularly well-liked.

The questionable quality of content produced by armies of authors paid to crank out search engine-friendly content has, not surprisingly, led Google to crack down on the content farmers.

But the internet is increasingly finding content from a new and perhaps even more controversial source: computers themselves.


AOL succeeds, struggles with its new ad formats

A year ago, AOL was prepping plans to launch new ad formats. Its initiative, codenamed Project Devil, was designed to provide ads that are more eye-catching and engaging than 'normal' ads.

As we detailed at the time, the ads would be up to four times larger and "be enabled with new functionality, with room for a photo gallery, a video, coupons, Facebook or Twitter updates or maps".

Project Devil was seen as crucial to AOL, which had been seeing significant double-digit declines in ad revenue. If AOL CEO Tim Armstrong was going to turn the company around, it seemed that the new initiative's success would be crucial.

Last week, however, we learned that AOL's new ad formats aren't finding as much tracking as hoped.


Mozilla's Do Not Track: the numbers so far

Earlier this year, Mozilla added a new feature to Firefox: do not track (DNT) functionality.

When enabled, the Firefox browser includes an HTTP header intended for advertisers and publishers that indicates the user does not want to be tracked.

Many, myself included, were skeptical about the potential efficacy of DNT, but how's it doing thus far?


The Guardian and WikiLeaks: is this the future of journalism?

For journalists, the present day may seem like both the best of times and the worst of times.

Traditional news organizations, disrupted by the internet, are struggling, making it harder to turn journalism into profit.

But at the same time, change brought about by the internet is creating exciting new opportunities for journalism.


Five big mistakes made by publishers

Publishing may be a tough business all around these days, but thanks to the internet, there are more publishers than ever.

Many of them won't survive, of course. And the ones that die won't just be traditional publishers that fail to adapt to the internet; there are plenty of digital publishers making potentially fatal mistakes too.


Panda: should publishers bother fighting back?

Talk to publishers about Google's Panda update, and chances are you'll find at least a few who haven't had a pleasant experience.

Google's goal of cleaning up its index may be desirable, and perhaps even necessary, but many publishers feel their legitimate websites were collateral damage.


Retailers and journalists: a match made in heaven?

Copy has always been important to online retailers. For obvious reasons, a well-written product description, for instance, is likely to produce more sales than the standard manufacturer's version.

But there's a new trend: online retailers going beyond product descriptions and building content-rich properties run in large part by folks from the publishing world.


Fortune bets on the web for its Fortune500+ mobile app

Mobile is here to stay, and publishers are eager to embrace it, even if figuring out how to is not an easy task.

Thus far, publishers have focused much of their effort on building native mobile apps, and it's no surprise why: mobile apps are being downloading at a frantic pace.

According to a recent report by IHS Screen Digest, the top four mobile app stores may generate close to $4bn in revenue this year, and ABI Research has forecast that by 2016, consumers will download 44bn mobile apps.

1 comment

Content as an appreciating asset

Content may be king. At least that's what many companies in the business of producing content think for obvious reasons.

Take Demand Media, for instance. It's so confident that its content is an appreciating asset that will produce value over a long period of time that it amortizes the costs of producing content over five years.


Why you should start to think like a media publisher

Every business is now a media business. Smart and successful ones think and behave like media publishers even though their origins are miles away from content creation.