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Posts tagged with Record Labels

Woulda, coulda, shoulda: the movie studios and their Netflix stock

Last month, beleaguered video rental chain Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy. While the company's demise can be blamed on a number of factors, it's hard to ignore one: the rise of Netflix.

Netflix, which is now an $8bn corporation trading at just over $153 per share, looks poised to capture a big part of the nascent streaming business.


France saves the music industry

The music business isn't as easy as it once was, and record labels often blame the internet for that. After all, the internet has enabled piracy on a scale never seen before, which is often cited as a major reason CD sales have declined so much.

While the internet did usher in an era of digital piracy, the truth of the matter is that industries change over time, and the strongest players in them find ways to adapt.

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Will the RIAA seek a DMCA replacement?

The business model of the recording industry is broken. Just about everyone knows it, including record label executives. But the industry collectively still seems to have a hard time admitting it.

So it's really no surprise that the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), which has gone so far as to sue grandmothers for illegal music downloads, is singing a new heartbreaker: copyright law is broken.


Download 'Hurt Locker' on BitTorrent? That might really hurt

The Hurt Locker won six Oscars earlier this year, and if its producers have their way, it will also be a big winner in court.

U.S. Copyright Group, a company operated by a group of intellectual property attorneys, has been retained by Voltage Pictures, which financed The Hurt Locker, to file a lawsuit targeting potentially tens of thousands of individuals who downloaded the film via BitTorrent. Ouch.


Spotify looks to make digital music more social

Popular European music streaming startup Spotify has been able to survive and thrive in a tough market that has seen its fair share of startup casualties. In an effort to maintain its growth, it has announced the largest upgrade since it first launched in 2008.

The goal: turn Spotify into a "total music management platform". The means: a hefty dose of social features.


Is ad blocking really devastating to the sites you love?

Ken Fisher, the founder and editor-in-chief of popular online tech publisher Ars Technica has a message to readers who use ad blockers: you're killing us.

In an effort to defeat ad blockers, last Friday Ars experimented with a technique designed to prevent Ars readers with ad blockers from viewing Ars content. According to Fisher, the experiment was a success "technologically" but not surprisingly, a "mixed bag" socially.


Lady Gaga cashes in on Spotify. Not

Swedish startup Spotify has taken Europe by storm. The ad-supported music streaming service, which also offers an ad-free and mobile-enabled paid offering, has more than 6m registered users across Europe, with more than 2.5m in the UK. Expansion into the US is planned for 2010.

Spotify's popularity has attracted investment from major record labels and recent reports suggest that Spotify may be Sweden's biggest contribution to the music business since Abba.


Google adding music to search

Google pretty much has its bases covered. Looking for an image? There's Google Images. Looking for a video? Video results appear in search. As do products.

But one thing has been noticeably absent: music. Which is not an insignificant fact given that two of the top 10 search queries in the United States are music-related. But Google being Google, it has a plan for music.


Is The Pirate Bay going legit?

If there was any group of individuals that you would expect to fight copyright holders to the bloody end, the people behind The Pirate Bay (TPB) were it. But apparently, a costly legal defeat can really take the wind out of just about any pirate's sails.

According to a press release issued today, the owners of TBP have sold TBP to publicly-traded software company Global Gaming Factory X (GGF) for $7.8m and GGF "intends to launch new business models that allow compensation to the content providers and copyright owners".

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Some charges against Pirate Bay tossed in copyright mega-case

Pirate Bay, the Swedish website known for hosting one of the largest indexes of pirated BitTorrent files, is embroiled in perhaps the copyright battle of the century.

Unlike many websites that engage in or facilitate alleged the sharing and downloaded of pirated content, The Pirate Bay has managed to stay in business since 2004 despite its visibility. And as record labels and studios see it, Pirate Bay is a business, complete with management and investors.


Were reports of the entertainment industry's death greatly exaggerated?

There has been a lot of talk about the decline of the traditional entertainment industry the past several years.

As a growing and maturing Internet has become a much more powerful medium for the distribution of media, traditional entertainment enterprises, from television networks to record labels, have increasingly faced new challenges that many argued threaten their survival.