{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Regulation

10 ways the Donald Trump presidency could affect tech and media

In January, Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

His stunning upset victory as an outsider with no political experience shocked the world, and now everybody is trying to figure out what the Trump presidency will actually mean.

0 comments

China introduces far-reaching new internet ad law: Why it matters

China's internet advertising market is much larger in proportion to its traditional advertising than Western countries.

The US, for example, spends less than half (47%) on internet and mobile advertising and slightly less on TV advertising (39%).

2 comments

Are regulations impeding financial services innovation?

Fintech upstarts are disrupting established financial institutions and many pin the blame on those very institutions, arguing that they're not innovative.

But now one bank is complaining that EU rules, namely the bonus cap instituted after the Great Recession, are impeding its ability to innovate by luring top tech talent and acquiring startups.

2 comments

Microsoft refuses to back down on Do Not Track, wants more complexity

More than a decade ago, Microsoft was branded by the United States government as a greedy monopolist and the company's existence was threatened by an antitrust lawsuit that could have resulted in the then-world's largest software company being broken apart.

Today, memories of Microsoft's past may have largely faded but the Redmond company is still trying to convince consumers that it's cool, and perhaps more importantly, that it's on their side. One of the ways it's doing that: declaring its support for consumer privacy.

2 comments

Does your company overestimate the value of an email address?

It may not be the new kid on the block, but email is, for many companies, one of the most effective and profitable digital marketing channels.

It's not hard to understand why: an email address, like a physical address or phone number, gives companies a means to connect with a known individual across time and space, making it a compelling medium for relationship-building.

7 comments

Do Not Track gains support, but will it really work?

Today, the administration of US President Barack Obama announced a blueprint for a "Privacy Bill of Rights."

The goal: "improve consumers’ privacy protections" and "give users more control over how their personal information is used on the Internet", all the while maintaining the internet's status as an "engine for innovation and economic growth."

To achieve that goal, the president has enlisted the help of some of the internet's biggest names, including Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL.

0 comments

Social media and regulation in banking

Within first direct, there is an understanding that social media is a channel we should be developing and engaging in, so in essence, that ‘internal sell’ is the easy bit.

The hard part however, is overcoming the way people think about regulation and compliance, and having both the confidence and strategy to feel comfortable working within these confines.

2 comments

The FTC's Do Not Track proposal: useless, harmful or both?

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has increasingly been taking a more active role in trying to make sure that online marketers aren't harming consumers. That has meant, amongst other things, keeping a close eye on marketing taking place through social channels. You know, Kim Kardashian's tweets.

Yesterday, the FTC issued a long-awaited staff report that "proposes a framework to balance the privacy interests of consumers with innovation that relies on consumer information to develop beneficial new products and services."

3 comments

ACTA one step closer to reality with EU Parliament approval

Last November, I suggested that ACTA, the not-so-secret-anymore Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement that governments have been negotiating for more than a year, could be "the worst thing for the internet - ever."

And with a 331-294 approval in the EU Parliament, it's one step closer to reality.

0 comments

Craigslist's growing PR problem

Craigslist is an internet icon, and it's a unique one. Despite the rapid evolution of the internet over the past decade, Craigslist in 2010 still looks like Craigslist in 2000. The fact that Craigslist has managed to thrive largely its original form is a testament to the value it offers.

But Craigslist is under assault. And it's not competitors who are attacking. It's politicians and the media. The reason: adult service ads which many say are frequently used in the illegal trafficking of women and children. And which many argue Craigslist continues to allow because they're a lucrative source of revenue.

5 comments

Google sets out to prove economic value

Last year, Google generated $54 billion of economic activity for American businesses, website publishers  and non–profits. That's according to a study released today by the search giant, which has embarked upon a campaign to show Google is not only creating value for Google, but for American businesses, the economy, and job-seekers as well.

And now that Google is an active presence on Capital Hill, it's a move doubtless calculated to portray the company as an economic engine to lawmakers, too, as privacy regulation activity comes slowly into focus. Google is telling its story through the stories of its small business advertisers - a tactic adopted by the IAB in its recent lobbying efforts as well. To underscore the political motivation behind the study, Google breaks down, on a state-by-state basis, which politicians are leveraging Google to communicate with constituents. For example, in New Jersey they name Governor Chris Christie and 11 state Senators and Representatives who communicate with constituents through official YouTube channels.

1 comment

How big a problem is digital piracy? Who knows?

One of the best ways to start a flame war online: make a claim about the costs of online piracy.

Some, of course, argue that online piracy isn't a problem. Free downloads are free promotion, the argument usually goes. Others, especially those in media industries that have found adjusting to the internet difficult, claim that online piracy is responsible for their woes.

1 comment