Posts tagged with Sina Weibo

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Digital in China: 10 things you might not know

Every quarter, Econsultancy delivers an update on the major internet players in China and their user experience.

Subscribers can download the full China Digital Report, but I've had a skirt through and picked out some interesting bits you may or may not know about digital in China.

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Manchester United kicks off digital transformation plan to improve fans' experience

Manchester United has announced a new digital transformation programme as it seeks to improve the customer experience for its 659m fans worldwide.

The Premier League club has partnered with Indian tech giant HCL to build an innovation lab at Old Trafford to prototype new digital ideas.

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Does innovation by Chinese social networks give a glimpse of Facebook's future?

Social media users in Western nations tend to be very precious about their favourite networks.

Witness the uproar when Facebook introduced the new timeline back in 2011, or the disbelief when Twitter dared to introduce blue lines linking related tweets.

We seem to be unwilling to accept that social networks should do anything other than the simple tasks for which they were originally designed, ignoring that fact that agility and innovation was what made these companies successful in the first place.

Instagram is perhaps the ultimate example of this, as it has become phenomenally popular despite the fact that all it does is share photos (admittedly it does that extremely well and I’m an avid user).

And I’d be interested to see the reaction if Instagram ever tried to drastically alter the interface or develop new functionality.

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Weibos, WeChat & Renren: how to approach social marketing in China

Chinese social networks can seem a daunting challenge for brands that are trying to expand their business in APAC.

Beyond the obvious language barrier marketers have to get to grips with new functionality, cultural behaviours and consumer expectations.

The Chinese internet population currently stands at 618m, with 81% connecting via mobile, so the opportunity is too big to ignore.

And with internet penetration at just 45% there's still plenty of room for growth.

To find out more about social media in China and how brands should be approaching social marketing, I spoke to HootSuite's APAC managing director Ken Mandel.

For more information on this topic, download Econsultancy's South-East Asia Digital Marketing Trends Briefing or our Chinese Digital Market Landscape Report.

Econsultancy Enterprise subscribers are also invited to attend a free roundtable on Ecommerce in China on Tuesday 15 April. Spaces are limited so click here to apply for a place.

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Manchester United

How Manchester United uses Facebook, Twitter, Sina Weibo and Google+

Manchester United has only been active on Twitter and Sina Weibo for one month, and Google + for less than a week. 

But with MUFC website traffic, in the last month of the 2012/2013 soccer season, at 67m page views, it's obvious there's plenty to work with here.

Along with a well-established Facebook page, MUFC has a foolproof and rather well executed strategy, best summed-up by the first G+ post.

Here you'll find a steady stream of iconic imagery, behind-the-scenes access, in-depth analysis and succinct storytelling about our club's rich history.

With Facebook adding many opportunities for MUFC to harvest email addresses from competitions and the like, and G+ a promising prospect for the same, there’s much to be cheerful about. Growing a big sports brand on social media is the equivalent of hitting a cow’s backside with a banjo.

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Censorship or surveillance: which keywords are flagged in China?

What do censorship and surveillance programmes look for? What can this tell us about internet usage in China?

Can we contrast with the perceived surveillance state of the West? What are the implications for a company in the Chinese market?

Unsurprisingly, there are lots of questions still to be answered about the state of the internet in China.

First Monday has this month published a very interesting paper, presenting an analysis of data from a year and a half tracking the censorship and surveillance keyword lists of two instant messaging (IM) programs used in China.

I thought it would be useful to sum up what Crandall et al. found, so you don’t have to read the whole thing. Although this study looks at IM clients, there are certainly findings that can be extrapolated across public services, such as Baidu and Sina Weibo.

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