Posts tagged with Social Proof

depop logo

Depop’s app trumps eBay with a slick combination of m-commerce and social

Depop was launched in April 2013 and has achieved 200,000 downloads from the App Store so far. 

The UK based start-up, which is difficult to describe as anything but a cross between Instagram and eBay, expertly marries mobile commerce with social networking and has many advantages over other m-commerce platforms: simple and quick selling, fluid checkout, inherent social integration and no listing fees.

According to TechCrunch, the app has been responsible for 200,000 items being sold worldwide, at a value of around €5m and as of February 2013, Depop is now available for Android users, thereby extending its reach to the dominant operating system of mobile users worldwide.

If you haven’t heard of Depop before, now is the perfect time to acquaint yourself. Here I’ll be looking at the app from a user experience point of view to see what the advantages and disadvantages are in using it. 

1 comment
Goodbye and stop signs

Using 'seducible moments' to turn goodbyes into conversion opportunities

If your website has a secure customer area, then you could be missing out on a chance to further engage or convert your visitors before their next visit. 

This post looks at some examples and options for capitalizing on this often overlooked ‘seducible moment’.

1 comment

11 great ways to use social proof in ecommerce

social proofOne of the most effective techniques you use on your ecommerce site to increase the confidence of buyers is 'social proof'.

Social proof is the phenomena where people tend to believe that the decision and actions of others reflect the correct behaviour in a given situation.

Here are 11 examples of social proof in action on ecommerce sites.

Some obvious, some more innovative. Please suggest any other great examples you've seen... 

15 comments

Social proof for digital marketers: a primer

Bar staff and subway buskers will routinely ‘seed’ their tips jars and guitar cases with some change so that passers by think that contributing is what is expected and are then compelled to do so themselves.

Can online marketers tap into this same psychology?

3 comments