Posts tagged with Sponsored Posts

How can ecommerce sites use Instagram?

As Facebook continues to ease the way businesses pay-to-play on its network, its other social network Instagram has notoriously kept marketers at a much further arm’s length.

Things are starting to change though.

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Native advertising

Native advertising: the business of eroding user trust?

Perhaps someday native advertising will mature into a viable alternative to traditional web advertising but today it creates more problems than answers. 

Here's why...

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The three main approaches to native advertising

Native advertising is one of the hottest marketing trends this year. From BuzzFeed to Twitter, the most admired businesses of our generation have been built on this supposedly new advertising medium.  

However, from my experience, understanding of what it really means is surprisingly low. People might understand that it’s akin to what was traditionally called advertorial, but few recognise the nuances of what is a surprisingly diverse medium.

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Native advertising: whatever it is, it shouldn't be PR

More and more publishers are rushing to embrace native advertising, and for good reason: advertisers are eager to spend money on it.

While there's debate and discussion around the exact definition of 'native advertising', publishers and advertisers are quickly learning that ads integrated into the user experience, often to the point that they're not immediately distinguishable as ads, come with challenges.

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The Atlantic's Scientology advertorial shows the risks of native ads

With advertisers set to pour more and more money into native ads, 2013 could be a great year for well-positioned publishers.

But publishers looking at native ads as a solution to ad blockers and paltry display CPMs should tread carefully.

Native ads aren't a panacea and the premiums advertisers may be willing to pay for them shouldn't distract from the fact that native ads can be risky ads.

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Google issues a penalty to itself

Google doesn't like paid links, sponsored posts and low-quality content. 

So it was quite surprising, and embarrassing, to learn this week that Google was associated with all three in an apparent effort to promote its web browser, Chrome.

That left Google with little ability but to respond and explain itself. And yesterday it did just that.

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Is Google violating its own guidelines to promote Chrome?

Google might be paying big bucks to Mozilla to be Firefox's default search provider, but its own browser Chrome is now by some counts more popular globally than Firefox itself.

Chalk it up to a good product, and Google's improved ability to market its wares to mainstream consumers.

But is Google also using questionable tactics to promote Chrome? Surprisingly, the answer may be yes.

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BlogHer '09 reveals the ugly side of social media

Social media can be a great tool but there's an ugly side. Because of the nature of social media, its commercialization has raised a number of issues around subjects like disclosure and integrity.

The reality is that paying to play is an easy and effective way for brands to get into the social media game. The downsides of this were demonstrated quite well at this year's BlogHer conference.

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