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Posts tagged with Streaming

Digital audio continues to boast impressive growth in the US: Stats

The North America online audio section of our Statistics Compendium has seen some fascinating data added in the past few months.

Particularly in regards to how significant digital downloads and streaming are to US music fans in 2016.

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Audio stats: streaming and online radio growth in the US

The latest update to our Internet Statistics Compendium collects all the most interesting freely digital data and trends published to the web over the past few months.

Like us, Mary Meeker strives to analyse online digital trends and publishes her own slideshows biannually (hosting them online here).

Amid a wealth of insight, Meeker’s recent stats collection highlights how online technologies are affecting traditional media. Her music consumption stats are particularly intriguing and relate to further research I’ve seen published lately.

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Spotify ads: which is right for your brand?

The global music streaming giant Spotify made £370m in revenue for 2012 with increases in both users and advertisers.

Spotify has a selection of ten main advert formats. Some are interruptive, others arrive during extended terms of no-use of the application, and some are clickable.

These ad formats will suit various types of businesses. The high-end or in need of last-second promotion (movie studios, album launches) will enjoy the light boxes and homepage takeovers, while small businesses with low budgets may prosper with trendy playlists.

This post details the five most commonly selected advert formats, with my own quick survey (via SurveyMonkey) of 100 people providing opinion as to which works best.

Take a look and which your brand could be using.

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Sky finally launches its internet TV service, NOW TV

In January, Sky announced that it would be launching a new online TV service later this year. Designed in large part to allow non-Sky customers to access Sky content, the service would allow its subscribers to access a variety of content, including movies and sports, on a pay-as-you-go basis.

Right on schedule, Sky today announced that the service, dubbed NOW TV, will be launching tomorrow.

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NBC to broadcast every event for 2012 London Olympics

London's 2012 Olympic Games are fast approaching, and NBC, which has television rights to the Olympics through 2020, is doing everything it can to recoup its substantial investment.

That's good news for viewers in the United States this year because NBC's strategy will make the 2012 Games coverage the most extensive yet.

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Amazon contemplates competing with Netflix

Netflix was once one of the highest-flying internet media companies around.

That all changed in 2012 when its CEO, Reed Hastings, decided that the days of requesting DVDs by mail were numbered.

The future of his business was streaming. To push consumers into the future, Hastings had to break 'DVDs by mail' and 'streaming' into two separate services, each requiring a different subscription.

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Netflix members streamed 2bn hours of content in Q4 2011

Netflix has announced that its members have streamed 2bn hours of TV shows and movies in Q4 2011.

With more than 20m global users, this equates to roughly 10 hours of content per person.

Netflix hit the headlines in October last year after losing 800,000 subscribers in the US following the decision to split its postal and online streaming services, so the announcement is good news as it gears up for expansion into the UK and Ireland in Q1 this year.

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Netflix enters the U.K. and Ireland as it stumbles in the U.S.

Yesterday, Netflix announced that its aggressive international expansion plans will bring its internet movie and television streaming service to the U.K. and Ireland in early 2012.

The announcement should have been a bright spot for a company which has been flying high for the past several years. But it was overshadowed by a bout of bad news: last quarter, Netflix lost 800,000 subscribers in the U.S.

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To prevent cord cutting, cable networks embrace the web

Are cable customers ditching their cords, or shaving them? While the debate over what cable customers are doing and planning to do with their cords continues, one thing is clear: cable players are concerned.

So in an effort to prevent cord cutting, they're increasing looking to find ways to embrace the channel cord cutting is blamed on the internet.

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Did Netflix just make a huge multichannel mistake?

With a market cap of over $15bn and a share price of $290, Netflix is one of the internet's highest flying stars. But changes the company is making to its pricing could have it crashing back down to earth.

Yesterday, the company announced that it is offering two separate plans going forward: one for unlimited DVDs by mail, which costs $7.99/month, and one for streaming, which also costs $7.99/month. Currently, Netflix customers can receive both unlimited DVDs and streaming for only $9.99/month.

Not surprisingly, a 60% price increase has sparked an online fury, with angry Netflix customers threatening to drop their Netflix subscriptions.

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Woulda, coulda, shoulda: the movie studios and their Netflix stock

Last month, beleaguered video rental chain Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy. While the company's demise can be blamed on a number of factors, it's hard to ignore one: the rise of Netflix.

Netflix, which is now an $8bn corporation trading at just over $153 per share, looks poised to capture a big part of the nascent streaming business.

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Online football streaming fails to take off

A survey finds that football fans are not streaming football matches online in anything like the numbers that broadcasters had hoped for, with just 2% saying they are likely to stream games online. 

Football clubs and broadcasters were hoping for additional revenue from internet streaming, but the online products on offer so far have little appeal for football fans and I can see why. 

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