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Posts tagged with Target

Facebook goes to Target with Facebook Credits gift cards

Facebook may not be a retailer, but that doesn't mean the company can't sell gift cards. Starting September 5, Target will start selling Facebook Credits gift cards in stores nationwide.

Consumers don't necessarily need easier ways to spend money on Facebook, but it is a great trick to introduce more consumers to Facebook games. Free marketing for Target, too.


Buy lettuce, get virtual currency

Has virtual currency jumped the shark, or has it become such a mainstream phenomenon that the ability to free virtual currency might be enough of an incentive to get some individuals to eat their broccoli? Social gaming company Zynga and Green Giant, the vegetable company owned by General Mills, are going to find out.

The unlikely pair have teamed up to offer purchasers of Green Giant products free virtual currency that can be used within Zynga's most popular game -- Farmville.


Proctor & Gamble's new e-store markets directly to consumers

Household goods manufacturers have long sold their products to consumers through middle men, whether it be pharmacies, chains, department stores or individual resellers. But in a world increasingly connected to the internet, why not go direct to consumers? 

That's an approach that Proctor & Gamble is trying with a new site that went live today. Consumers can now purchase any P&G product for a flat shipping rate of $5. But do consumers have the kind of manufacturer loyalty that will make this a popular shopping method? P&G thinks it's worth finding out.


Case study: e.l.f. is changing the cosmetics industry, $1 at a time

Through a mix of social media, word of mouth and user generated content, women around the country have slowly been learning the secret to buying cheap cosmetics online. It comes in the name e.l.f. The brand (which stands for Eyes Lips Face) has been selling cosmetics online for five years at absurdly low price points. For a long time all their products could be found for $1 each.

Designed by Scott Borba, the man behind Hard Candy and Neutrogena Men, e.l.f. cuts out the marketing budget — and markup — that most cosmetics companies attach to their products. And the results have been astounding. This week, e.l.f. is making a large push into Target stores and online. The company is on track to reach over $20 million in sales this year.

With price points at $1, $3 and $5 an item, that's a lot of lip gloss. How did they do it?


Wal-Mart, Target and the battle for online buzz

There's good news for Target's marketing team: when it comes to online buzz, Target is handily beating its larger rival, Wal-Mart.

That's according to online reputation monitoring firm Crimson Hexagon, which looked at what was being said about each retailer online between July 15 and September 3, 2009.


Target finds a way to sell visitors a piece of New York

Tapping into the consumerist impulses of American travelers visiting big cities can be a lucrative endeavor, and Target is hoping that those in New York City will be interested in taking a piece of Times Square home with them.

The retailer is installing four biilboards this weekend. And along with the traditional I Heart NY t-shirts that have become a staple on every corner around the city, visitors can bring home a piece of those billboards in the shape of an Anna Sui designed tote bag that can be purchased online.


Q&A: Jim Stengel on purpose driven brands and the state of marketing today

Jim Stengel spent seven years as the global marketing officer at Procter & Gamble and is largely credited for transforming P&G into one of the most admired brand-building companies in the world. He is now president of Jim Stengel, LLC, a think tank and a consultancy that focuses on proprietary research and ways to drive business growth in the current economy. He is also a director of the Motorola Corporation and serves on the Board of Advisors for MarketShare Partners, a marketing analytics firm.

His new book 'Packaged Good', which is set to come out next year, examines the role that purpose driven marketing plays in growing market share for brands.

This week, he was appointed as an adjunct marketing professor at UCLA's Anderson School of Management. Starting next January, he will teach brand marketing to graduate students at the university.

Econsultancy caught up with the marketing guru to see what his plans are at UCLA and what role purpose driven marketing can play in a downturn.

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