Posts tagged with The Atlantic

Native advertising

Native advertising: the business of eroding user trust?

Perhaps someday native advertising will mature into a viable alternative to traditional web advertising but today it creates more problems than answers. 

Here's why...

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Native advertising: 12 fascinating examples of good and bad practice

You’re more likely to survive a plane crash than click a banner ad.

That’s my favourite stat of 2013, thanks to Solve Media.

Faith in traditional digital display advertising is fast decreasing, with many experts believing that banner ads just don’t work. 60% of consumers do not remember the last display ad they saw, according to Online Media Daily.

Display ads don’t work because we’ve become used to ignoring them. They used to be an annoyance; a creatively barren distraction, but now we’ve trained ourselves, almost subconsciously, to glance down a webpage and not even notice them. 

Mobile banner ads are far more insidious and harder to ignore. According to GoldSpot Media, up to 50% of clicks on mobile ads are accidental.

So what’s the alternative?

I wrote an introduction to the world of native advertising last November in which I discuss the various merits or otherwise of this content driven approach to advertising.

Here I’ll be presenting examples of this much argued-over marketing trend, and trying to ascertain whether there is any good or bad practice to be gleaned from the more popular native ads hosted on publisher’s sites.

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The three main approaches to native advertising

Native advertising is one of the hottest marketing trends this year. From BuzzFeed to Twitter, the most admired businesses of our generation have been built on this supposedly new advertising medium.  

However, from my experience, understanding of what it really means is surprisingly low. People might understand that it’s akin to what was traditionally called advertorial, but few recognise the nuances of what is a surprisingly diverse medium.

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Native advertising: whatever it is, it shouldn't be PR

More and more publishers are rushing to embrace native advertising, and for good reason: advertisers are eager to spend money on it.

While there's debate and discussion around the exact definition of 'native advertising', publishers and advertisers are quickly learning that ads integrated into the user experience, often to the point that they're not immediately distinguishable as ads, come with challenges.

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The Atlantic's Scientology advertorial shows the risks of native ads

With advertisers set to pour more and more money into native ads, 2013 could be a great year for well-positioned publishers.

But publishers looking at native ads as a solution to ad blockers and paltry display CPMs should tread carefully.

Native ads aren't a panacea and the premiums advertisers may be willing to pay for them shouldn't distract from the fact that native ads can be risky ads.

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Is Tumblr important, or just a distraction?

Tumblr, which has been described as a publishing tool that's somewhere between Twitter/Facebook and a full-fledged blog, is a fast-rising star in the crowded world of social media. It recently passed the one billion post mark, and it counts some pretty prominent publishers, including The Economist and Newsweek, as users.

The latest recognizable name in publishing to jump on the Tumblr bandwagon is The Atlantic. It doesn't know what to expect from its Tumblr experiment, but it's getting involved with Tumblr nonetheless.

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A book with a view: Andrew Sullivan's crowdsourced book pricing scheme

Andrew Sullivan's Daily Dish blog may be best known for political content, but its most popular feature is party agnostic and user generated. Over the last three years, readers have submitted photos of scenes snapped from their windows, for a weekly featured titled "The View From Your Window."

Amid hundreds of photos and growing interest, The Atlantic has now chosen 200 of those images and produced a coffee table book. The front and back images have been crowd sourced. But that's not as interesting as the price tag, which depends on how many people purchase the book.

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