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Posts tagged with Tone Of Voice

Four things brands can learn about tone of voice from Gymbox

There’s not much that can motivate me to go to the gym. Other than the realisation that I’m wasting a gut-wrenching amount of money each month that is.

Maybe my reluctance stems from the fact that gyms can be rather sterile and soulless places. 

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paddy power logo

How three top betting sites handle social content

Social content is – or at least should be – entirely driven by a brand’s tone of voice. And that tone of voice should be driven in turn by the brand’s target audience and the image it wants to achieve. 

Betting companies are interesting because they get away with stuff that a lot of other brands wouldn’t (everyone remembers the ‘last one to sign up to a Paddy Power account is a t***’ banner ad).  

I thought I’d look at three of the top UK betting sites to see how they handle social content and what other brands can learn from their success. 

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Top 10 digital marketing stats of the week

Here’s a stat for you: 100% of Jack Simpsons say this is a very sad day indeed, according to a new survey by Jack Simpson. 

Why? Well, loyal stat devourers, I am sorry to announce that this is last time I will fill your lives with life-changing facts and figures from the marketing world. 

Yes, this is my last day as the official weekly Econsultancy digital marketing stats round-up guy. 

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Four brands with a brilliantly funny tone of voice

Tone of voice (ToV) is extremely important when you’re trying to build a distinctive brand. It’s the personality of your business. The thing people will remember you by.

One way to to have a memorable ToV is to be funny, but there aren’t many brands who can consistently pull it off without subsequent cringing on the audience's part.  

In this post I’m going to cover four that can.

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How to achieve the right tone of voice for your brand

The way a person speaks is one of the first things people notice.

Soft-spoken, polite, enthusiastic, rude, dull: you can make an instant judgement about somebody based on how they communicate. 

It is no different for brands. The way a brand speaks to its audience is extremely important, because that is how people are going to remember it. 

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lyric suite

How to create simple brand tone-of-voice guidelines for Twitter

I've thrown together a very simple template to allow you to shape your tone of voice on Twitter.

It's merely a basic form reminding you of what your brand stands for, alongside some examples of good and bad practice.

Consistent tone-of-voice is achieved with the occasional reinforcement of brand values and personality, and is something that most community managers pick up quickly.

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The importance of tone of voice for local markets

How do you speak to your customers? That's a deceptively simple question...

We all understand the importance of tone of voice, particularly when it comes to customer service, but in an age of hyper-localisation it can be increasingly difficult for comms teams to communicate with customers in new markets.

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tone button

A simple tip for improving your brand tone of voice guidelines

As consumers we expect brands to speak to us in a consistent tone of voice. 

We want communications that reflect each brand’s personality and fit within a defined set of characteristics.

We don’t, for example, expect Paddy Power to come over all serious and conscientious, much as it would be a shock to the system if Dior became cheeky and self-deprecating.

But finding and maintaining a tone of voice can be a difficult challenge, particularly when writing copy for a broad range of digital and print communications.

I recently attended the Econsultancy Advanced Online Copywriting Training Course where the rather excellent trainer, Tim Fidgeon, showed us a useful task for helping to identify the correct tone of voice for your brand.

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tone dial

11 values that create an effective tone of voice, plus six to avoid

In developing a brand voice, many organisations make use of tonal values. This helps you work the different aspects of your brand’s promise into your writing.

You might want to be seen as experts in your domain, for example, but you also want your users to know you take customer service seriously.

So having a tonal value like ‘authoritative’ alongside another value such as ‘helpful’ can help you capture and project these different nuances in your comms.

Values enable you to flex your voice for different channels, audiences and message types. You might be a fashion-forward clothes retailer, for instance, so a tonal value like ‘inspirational’ might be an obvious choice in lots of contexts; on the other hand, when you’re explaining your returns policy, you probably want to dial up a different tonal value: ‘helpful’ perhaps, or ‘straightforward’.

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Micro-copywriting: the good, the bad and the cheesy pictures

Words are the most important tool marketers and ad men have. To prove it, I’ll show you a picture.

The chart beneath the Bee Gees shows that 60% of people prefer a ‘print experience’ to something ‘whizzy’, on a tablet app.

Obviously, 'print-like' doesn't just mean words, it also refers to typography and, to some extent, pictures. However, in this post I'll be focusing on copywriting, on an achingly small scale.

I'll be highlighting titbits of copy that are done well, in keeping with a company's brand, and make a web experience enjoyable, as well as some that aren't so good.

In the spirit of new media, I’m calling this ‘micro-copy’. And, to the dismay of the A/B testers, I’ll posit that some of my examples are qualitatively ‘better’ than others.

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