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Posts tagged with Tv

cadbury

The 10 most shared video adverts of 2016

Video ad tech company Unruly has revealed the most shared ads of 2016.

Here are the top 10...

(Tip: a particular favourite of mine is the terrible Europop on the Cadbury advert.)

0 comments
buster

Why Asda and Waitrose have won the battle of the Xmas TV adverts in 2016

My overwhelming feeling after watching a whole bunch of Christmas adverts is that brands aren't really sure what approach to take.

Have they misjudged the consumer of 2016? Let's start with John Lewis...

4 comments
mcdonalds

McDonald's provides a new template for so-bad-it's-good TV adverts

For the past two weeks nothing has occupied my mind as fixedly as the McDonald's Monopoly TV adverts.

The burger giant has generated an incredible amount of word-of-mouth in the UK simply by creating a rather confused, social TV campaign.

Why? And what, if anything, can we learn from it?

0 comments
cuddling devices

Smartphones, tablets or TV: How do we consume media in 2014?

How do we consume media in 2014? And what media? And on which devices?

Ofcom released The Communications Market Report in August 2014 and it's chock full of interesting data and charts on the UK market.

I've previously looked at mobile and tablet usage. Now I'm turning by attention to the broader topic of media uptake, in its various forms.

For more statistical goodness, download our Internet Statistics Compendium...

2 comments
the internet

How do we use the internet and mobile devices in 2014?

Ofcom today published The Communications Market Report 2014 in the UK.

There are lots of interesting stats within, across telecoms, audio-visual industries, post and of course the internet.

No doubt we'll be covering the report fairly heavily, but I thought I'd start by rounding up the bits that caught my eye.

How is device use changing? How are people accessing media? How much are advertisers spending and on what?

4 comments
The Mindy Project Tinder Profiles

Covert native ad campaigns can catfish consumers

A New York City doctor with a Witherspoon personality, Nicki Minaj body, Sinatra eyes and love of fried donuts might be your perfect match.

She’s 34, single and looking to meet other local singles in the city. She may seem too good to be true, and that’s because she is.

This New York City bachelorette’s main motivation is to prompt you to tune in for the season premiere of her primetime TV show, The Mindy Project, on Fox Primetime.

0 comments
homer on a tv

My fundamental doubts about the second screen

Forgive the first person pronoun in the headline, but television is the most emotive of subjects.

Not for nothing does the Simpsons use the TV set as a cultural trope. Perhaps the emergence of broadband and the creative decline of the Simpsons is more than correlative?

Anyway, I don’t dispute the second screen phenomenon, not one bit. I use my phone whilst watching TV all the time.

What I am disputing, outside of a few important examples, is the extent of consumer demand for contextual second screen experiences. Within this disputation comes the assertion that a lot of second screen use is indeed not contextual (aside from social media use) and cannot therefore be ‘monetised’ as such.

Of course, fans of the second screen may point out that the reason second screen usage isn’t yet contextual is because second screen services and apps are nowhere near maturation yet. There may be improved uses and better content to come.

I’d argue that the same problems that beset social advertising (a place for branding but not sales) will ultimately beset the second screen, driven as it is by the demand for socialising whilst watching the box.

See if you agree with my devil’s advocate’s views.

12 comments
Facebook logo

Facebook and TV: can it compete with Twitter for live engagement?

One need only look at the trending topics on any given evening to know that Twitter is a popular tool for discussing television shows.

The network has become the go-to forum for reaction to TV programmes and is one of the few things that ensures people still watch live TV rather than relying on on-demand services.

However a new report suggests that Facebook may also be a popular talking shop for TV shows.

This is a topic we’ve previously discussed in articles looking at why Facebook can’t beat Twitter for social TV and a best practice post on driving live engagement.

But the new report suggests we may have been wrong to dismiss Facebook’s potential for TV chatter, with up to a quarter of the television audience posting content related to the show they are watching on Facebook.

1 comment
1950 camera

The future of TV: five innovations to look out for

The box, the tube, the telly, the television. Are any of us sure the set is set to evolve?

The television is one of those unifying pleasures and most people are already happy with the experience of watching it.

Additionally, advertisers still think of television as the big hitting ad medium, rightly or wrongly. 

So, if it’s not broken, why fix it? Or is that the kind of reasoning that stymies innovation?

I think it’s fairly obvious that although we can choose to think of television as a constant, it has changed significantly since it went digital. FreeView in the UK, TiVo, Sky+, on-demand services like iPlayer and Netflix, Apple TV and Chromecast, the impact of Twitter and social TV, Roku, there have been many developments.

But what’s next? Here I’ve tried to sum up some of the innovations for advertisers and viewers I’ve seen in the last few months. See what you think..

2 comments
the matrix: what if i told you you can engage a tv audience

Twitter and TV: ignore the stats and focus on best practice

In this post, bear with me and you’ll get a couple of case studies and some best practice from brands using TV and promoted tweet tie-ups.

Before I give you the fun stuff, I want to say that best practice is all that matters. Ignore all the stats about engagement and sales uplift.

I don’t usually advocate ignoring stats, but as B2B marketing and service industries now pervade major cities of the developed world, we are awash with stats. And stats that claim to explain general concepts, such as generic increase in purchase intent after viewing a promoted tweet that references TV, are not helpful to you.

Yes, these stats succinctly explain the perceived benefits of advertising on Twitter, but like all data, it’s only that which directly pertains to your company that is of use.

There’s no point examining averaged trends when what you’re interested in is your business. Being blinded by amazing engagement stats will mean you don’t think properly about your campaigns. The last thing you want to do is drip out a poorly conceived set of promoted tweets and have faith they will deliver ROI.

The success of your marketing and advertising is dependent entirely upon detail; detail that’s way more granular than simply what channels you decide to advertise in.

1 comment
doctor who

Doctor Who starring you! The BBC launches awesome new Facebook app

The BBC has launched a new Facebook app, allowing you to play the next Doctor Who, inserting your name and mugshot into the opening credits.

HTML5 video technology is used and accounts for the very slick results.

The app is fronted on the main Facebook page and ties in to the fiftieth anniversary of the Doctor and the celebratory episode airing on November 23.

5 comments

First direct’s platypus: is humour still a risk?

‘Firstdirect is like the platypus of banks, a little bit different’. This is correct, and the ad can be considered a televisual success.

However, online, apart from a well-deployed and anonymous teaser video, the campaign’s lack of fecundity is its main similarity with the platypus. 

I’ve had a little look at this curate’s egg of a campaign, with some good and bad bits revealed.

5 comments