Posts tagged with Web Design Trends

17 crucial web design trends for 2015

Please do not mistake me for some kind digital prognosticator, soothsayer guru, evangelist, swami, samurai or whatever risible term is currently popular in digital marketing circles.

I am but one writer who has spent the last year immersed (and only occasionally floundering) in previously unchartered waters in my first 12 months of writing for Econsultancy.

This isn’t just a list of trends that I’ve noticed during my own research, but also ones discovered by my many venerable colleagues, various friends of the blog and passed on to me by Dan Barker or compiled throughout the year by Chris Lake.

9 comments
bbc earth

BBC Earth: seven web content trends to notice

BBC Earth showcases some of the content trends the Beeb has been championing in the revamp of its site.

I've taken a quick shufty through these lovely webpages in an attempt to find exactly what these design trends are.

See if you agree.

1 comment
minimalist

Five influencers of clean and simple web design in publishing

Designing usable and enjoyable experiences for people online, across devices, is defining business change.

It's no surprise then that some of the most visited posts on the Econsultancy blog concern web design.

Chris Lake has traditionally written about web design trends for the year, with eight of his 18 trends for 2014 pointing towards minimalist design.

These were flat UI, mobile first, minimalist navigation, monochrome and hypercolour (perhaps summed up as high contrast), cards and tiles, bigger images and fixed position content.

I wanted to write a simple post highlighting key examples of clean and simple web design from publishing.

2 comments

15 delicious examples of card-based web design

The rise of the smartphone has ushered in a new way of thinking among web designers and developers, who need to create websites that work on smaller screens.

The constraints of smaller screens have actually helped the web to become that little bit more modular, with responsive design now one of the foremost web design trends: pages can be broken up into their constituent parts, and reordered on the fly, depending on browser or screen sizes. Content spread over three or four columns can be repositioned into just one. 

This has refocused attention on 'cards', as a design pattern for displaying information in bite-sized chunks. Cards are ideal for the TL;DR generation, perfect for mobile devices and responsive design, and I think we'll be seeing a lot more of them in the months and years ahead. The format may not be new, but it's on the rise.

What is a card, exactly? Well, they come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but commonly cards will include information such as a title, a user name, a picture, and various icons. Sometimes there might be a brief amount of text, for example a product description. In a sense, they are miniature, condensed web pages.  

Cards were one of my 18 web design trends for 2014, and I wanted to highlight some beautiful examples of card-based user interfaces. Tuck in!

7 comments

18 pivotal web design trends for 2014

What web design trends do you think we'll see in 2014? I'm betting on more simplicity, more cleanliness, and more focus on smaller screen sizes, among other things.

This collection is largely based on observation, vaguely educated guesswork, waving a finger in the air, and a bunch of other posts I've compiled in recent months. As such, some of these predictions may be more accurate than others!

No doubt I have missed all manner of trends, so do share your own thoughts and predictions in the comments section below. 

87 comments

20 experiential web design trends for 2012

Web design by its very nature continues to evolve, as it must, to make the most of modern browsers and the likes of HTML5, CSS3 and JQuery, and to provide a wonderful user experience for tablet and smartphone owners.

Nowadays there is plenty of opportunity to stand out from the crowd, by being ahead of the curve, or by embracing new techniques that can help you to improve the performance of your website.

So I thought I’d round up some of the more recent trends in experiential web design. I say ‘experiential’ because I’m less interested in seeing whether drop shadows have made a comeback. 

The focus of this article is primarily about the aspects of web design that directly affect the user experience, rather than particular stylistic trends to do with the look and feel.

Great designers understand how to design for user interaction, and how to encourage new user behaviours and habits. World-class designers introduce emotion and have fun along the way. 

Some of these trends aren’t just-out-of-the-oven new, but they’re in here because they’ve become adopted by the mainstream. I have included other design features because they rock, and I’d like to see them on more websites.

It’s worth pointing out that user experience professionals are on the fence about some of these things. Do leave a comment if you feel strongly, one way or another, and be sure to let me know what I’ve missed.

23 comments