Posts tagged with Website Design

national trust

How the National Trust replatformed: 500 editors & a 10-year strategy

In November we covered the new National Trust website, a funky, responsive number with bold typography and brilliant imagery.

The Trust obviously has great brand equity because the post was very popular, even attracting some irked Trust members who felt the new site needed work.

So, we thought the digital journey of the National Trust warranted more investigation, and we caught up with Tom Barker, head of digital.

Here's what he had to say.

0 comments
national trust

Eight reasons the new National Trust website is funkier than yours

"Oh, he lives in a house, a very big house in the country."

Join me in song as I celebrate one of the most beloved institutions in the UK and the launch of its new website.

Yes, it's the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, or simply National Trust for short.

22 comments
kpp homepage

10 successful homepages that show the trend for video backgrounds

GIF and video backgrounds are spreading. 

Focus on enjoyable customer experiences has led many to create focused, unfussy websites that provide clear messages and unforgettable images.

Open source platforms and social media have played a large part in perpetuating this trend. The rise of the smartphone means we're more comfortable with scrolling experiences, so content can be dispersed down the page.

4 comments
Land Rover

Land Rover: An automotive revolution in luxury content marketing

Car manufacturer websites, particularly luxury cars, used to be a bit of a bugbear of mine. 

The industry was to me a perfect case of how copycat web builds that ignore best practice result in a frustrating mix of dark, flash-ridden websites with a lack of content.

Land Rover bucks the trend. Here are four reasons why.

0 comments

12 supernatural examples of ghost buttons in ecommerce

Who you gonna call? Ghost buttons!

Well you can’t actually because they’re a design element used for navigating websites rather than a tangible way of communicating with a paranormal emergency service. Unless of course the button is a click-to-call in which case…

I think I’ll start again.

6 comments

Good and bad design from PR agency websites

PR and marketing agencies don't have it easy. This crowded B2B market means agencies have to crow loudest, longest and with most meaning.

This is a simple little post marking a few things I've liked looking at on agency websites, and some things I haven't. There's likely a whole host of posts to write on copy alone, web design alone, and content alone, but this is just a snippet to start.

I would be very glad to hear pet hates about agency websites in the comments below (keep it friendly:-).

2 comments

64 tips to make sure that your website delivers business value

With the economy in a seemingly perpetual crisis, businesses are under ever more pressure from their finance and managing directors to ensure all business tools and investments are delivering the desired results.

This includes websites ranging from simple brochure websites to marketing campaign websites to multi-channel international e-commerce solutions with integrated supply chains.

4 comments

The 11 Cs of e-commerce internationalisation

Taken from our Internationalisation of E-commerce Best Practice Guide, this extract provides a framework to enable you to quickly review the opportunities and challenges presented by a specific market and help you make an initial judgement of what markets to enter.

Here are the 11 Cs of e-commerce internationalisation...

0 comments

Web designs that communicate across cultures

Targeting international customers involves a lot more than just translating a website. Global companies, such as McDonald's and Twitter, show the importance of adapting designs to reach different audiences.

It’s said an image can tell a thousand words, and a well-designed website can make or break an online company. But the message it’s sending can vary depending on the audience.

Communicating effectively with global customers can involve much more than simply translating the content. It also means thinking carefully about other design aspects, from choice of colours to navigation.

1 comment