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Posts tagged with Word Press

blogger logo

Google's Blogger vs WordPress: which is better for beginners?

Recently I’ve just completed a series on how to set up and run a WordPress blog for beginners. 

It covered everything from sign up to using the content management system (CMS) to SEO best practice tips.

What the series didn’t cover was the difference between WordPress and some of the other free-to-run blogging platforms out there. So in the interests of balance and all things fair, I’m going to take a look at Google’s Blogger from a UX point of view and see how it compares to WordPress.

1 comment
calendar

Eight free content calendar templates to help plan your output

Content marketing is the hot new thing in digital, I think we can all agree.

But all this delicious content doesn't just create itself unfortunately. It requires strategy and planning in order to come up with blogs, white papers, videos, websites or whatever else you're producing to engage with your audience.

To coordinate all your content ideas effectively it is necessary to come up with a content calendar. 

Now while you could spend sometime coming up with your own content calendar from scratch, it’s obviously easier to simply customise an existing template.

Thankfully there are already numerous templates out there, including our own Content Marketing Calendar which comes as part of the Digital Marketing Templates Files bundle.

I’ve also detailed a number of other resources below, but first allow me to delve further into the reasons for having a content calendar.

5 comments
wordpress logo

20 essential WordPress plugins

This is the eighth and final instalment (for now) in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

Last week I covered the big move from WordPress.com to WordPress.org. A move that will have now opened up the highly exclusive and endlessly varied world of WordPress plugins.

A plugin is a piece of software that acts as an add-on feature to your website or blog, offering additional functionality. 

These can be developed by WordPress itself or by a third-party company and range in function from social media integration to automatic search engine optimisation to spam comment filtering. There's a huge array of choice.

Only WordPress.org users (those who host their own site and who don’t mind getting their hands dirty with coding and other technical matters) have access to these third-party plugins.

So this week I’ll be recommending the most vital of these plugins for your brand new WordPress.org site.

3 comments
house moving

How to transfer your blog from WordPress.com to WordPress.org

This is the seventh in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

This week: the big move!

If you’ve been running your blog happily for the last year or so, picked up some fairly positive comments and attracted some healthy organic traffic you may be thinking: what next?

Is there more I can do? Perhaps you’d like to dig around in the code to improve the look and usability of your site. Perhaps you’d like to ditch the .WordPress part of your URL. Perhaps you’ve discovered there’s a whole world of fancy plug-ins available to WordPress.org users to customise their site in ways you can’t within your blog.

Here I’ll look at domain name registration, finding a web host, installing WordPress.org and importing all of your existing content.

2 comments
typewriter journalist

A blogger’s guide to setting up a WordPress site: 10 great responsive themes

This is the fifth in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

In the first article I discussed the first few steps involving sign-up, the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, and your social media presence.

Then I looked at writing your first post using the WordPress content management system (CMS), in which I gave some helpful writing advice for first-time bloggers, and later I delved into the WordPress dashboard and its diverse world of widgets.

Last week I took an in-depth look the art of customising your existing WordPress template, either by using the free options available or with the Custom Designs upgrade.

Throughout the article, I used the same template as an example for guidance on customisation. However there are many other templates available to WordPress.com users, all of which can be customised in the same ways as the above link describes.

Here I’ll be recommending the best of those out-of-the-box templates to make your blog stand out from the crowd. The first 10 highlighted are fully responsive, meaning they will adapt to any screen size the site is viewed on.

2 comments
back to the future delorean dashboard

A number of wildly entertaining things found on the internet, ranked in no particular order

You can make your own mind up as to the order of this selection.

In fact, why not copy and paste the content, reshuffle it into your own order by whatever logic you choose and upload it to Buzzfeed? Boom, you've got yourself brand new content. What have you got to lose? Go on, have a ball.

Henry Elliss made me think long and hard about clickbait in his article the dirty secrets of clickbait will blow your mind this week.

Subsequently I realise it's churlish of me to criticise Buzzfeed, Upworthy and other publishers that use overlong headlines coupled with weightless content to attract traffic, in a post that is essentially devoted to my favourite cat memes and stuff I've stolen off Reddit.

Some readers will decry me as a hypocrite for this and to those people I say the following: "woah did you see this awesome doge gif? It will make your head explode!"

2 comments
His Girl Friday

A blogger’s guide to setting up a WordPress site: customising your template

This is the fourth in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

In the first article I discussed the first few steps involving sign-up, the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, and your social media presence.

Then I looked at writing your first post using the WordPress content management system (CMS) and I also offered some general writing tips for new bloggers.

Last week I delved into the dashboard and the diverse world of widgets.

This week things get really interesting, as I'll be looking at customising your existing template, either by using the free options available or with the Custom Designs upgrade.

1 comment

A blogger’s guide to setting up a WordPress site: 14 vital widgets

This is the third in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

In the first article I discussed the first few steps involving sign-up, the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, and your social media presence.

Last week, I looked at writing your first post using the WordPress content management system (CMS) and I also offered some general writing tips for new bloggers.

This time I’ll be delving into the dashboard to help you set up the ‘backend’ of your blog, by taking a look at the diverse world of widgets.

Firstly though a quick note about the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org in relation to ‘plugins’.

3 comments
hunter s thompson

A blogger’s guide to setting up a WordPress site: writing your first post

This is the second in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

Last time I discussed the first few steps, involving sign-up, the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org, and your social media presence.

In this article I’ll discuss writing your first post using the WordPress content management system (CMS), but first, here are some general writing tips for bloggers using any platform.

6 comments
marlon brando cat typewriter

A blogger’s guide to setting up a WordPress site: the first few steps

This is the first in a series of posts discussing how to set up and run a WordPress blog from a relatively experienced expert, which will feature many helpful and hopefully relevant tangents.

Firstly I should reveal a little bit of background about myself. I began a WordPress blog a few years ago; it was a little read music site full of rambling incoherent nonsense semi-related to reviewing new albums. 

Inexplicably within six months, the blog had grown beyond its humble beginnings as something to annoy my friends on Facebook with, to something that was doing fairly well in search engine results pages (SERPs) and driving higher than anticipated traffic.

I took the decision to transfer the blog from WordPress (which restricts you to the .WordPress.com suffix) to its own domain (with the much more loved by seach engines suffix .com), hosted by a third-party service, while still using a WordPress template and its various plug-ins.

5 comments
responsive design

11 easy responsive themes for ecommerce and small business

Responsive design isn't just for the giants of ecommerce, your start-up business can also grab an off-the-shelf model for a reasonable price, or even for free.

Following on from David Moth's article 10 simple responsive Wordpress themes for small businesses and blogs I thought I would take a look at some of the best available templates for ecommerce sites.

If you run a small business, or are looking to make the leap from Etsy or eBay into your own domain, you could do a lot worse then looking at one of the following templates.

As a caveat, I haven't used any of these in their proper working forms, I've just played around with the demo versions, checking for customisability and whether the sites really do offer true responsiveness.

It would be worth doing your own investigation on each one before committing to buy. If you click on the images below, you will be taken through to the demo versions where you can check out the product, look at the custom options and of course the price of the product yourself.

Templates are available from many different vendors and the bulk of these are from independent designers, but first I'll take a look at the best designs available from Shopify.

3 comments
WordPress

11 excellent responsive WordPress themes for bloggers or SMEs

WordPress is the most popular blogging platform around thanks to its user-friendly interface and affordable themes.

And in keeping with current web trends there are a huge number of excellent responsive templates currently available.

For small businesses or amateur bloggers a responsive WordPress theme is an excellent option as it allows the site owner to offer users a mobile experience without spending loads of money.

I’ve previously rounded up 10 simple responsive WordPress themes for small businesses, and to add to that list here are 11 more that are available either for free or for a relatively small investment.

10 comments