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Posts in Content

Landmark EU ruling moves the boundaries for publishers

Last week we saw Mirror Group Newspapers (MGN) lose its appeal to overturn a privacy action in the French courts by actor Olivier Martinez.

Martinez successfully sued the publishers of the Sunday Mirror in 2008 over an article that was published online about the actor’s then relationship with Kylie Minogue, saying that it negatively affected his reputation in France.

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How to optimise headlines using the 65 character rule

I’m currently developing some wireframes as we pave the way for a revamp of this blog later this year. There are lots of things to think about. One of those things is typography. Closely related to that is optimal headline length. 

I always try to write headlines that fit on one line, though I don’t always succeed. Nevertheless, short headlines beat longer ones for lots of reasons. As such I’d like to introduce the 65 character rule. Actually it’s 65 or less, to be precise. 

Here’s why...

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Apple isn't worried about the Kindle Fire, but should it be?

Apple may have disappointed Wall Street with its fourth quarter earnings, but make no mistake about it: most companies would kill for a quarter like it.

The company issued a strong guidance for the first quarter of fiscal year 2012, and Apple's CEO Tim Cook is confident.

Case in point: when it comes to the nascent tablet market, Cook isn't at all worried about possible competition from new devices like Amazon's Kindle Fire.

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Five tricks our minds play on us and what marketers need to know

There’s a phenomena on the cusp between behavioral economics and psychology known as cognitive biases which are essentially scientifically documented tricks that our minds play on us.

As all of us in the world of digital marketing are in the business of persuasion, understanding these often irrational tendencies can help us do a better job.

Some are glaringly oblivious when you’re alerted to them, other are far more subtle in the way they influence decision making. 

I recently delivered a talk at A4U Expo London exploring a few of these ‘mind tricks’ but I want to explain them further and in more depth.

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Managing expectations in B2B content marketing

Your audience's opinions abut your content depends largely on their expectations, but few B2B marketers think about managing expectations around their content marketing.

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Seven steps to sublime (or at least successful) subject lines

In a world increasingly driven by content that's hiding in an email or behind a Tweet, subject lines are more important than ever.

In advance of a talk later this week at the Internet Marketing Conference in New York, here are some of the approaches and best practices in crafting better subject lines.

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Thanks to Panda, content farms start harvesting less content

Love them or hate them, content farms are a reality on today's web. Thanks to the strength of the search economy, savvy upstart publishers realized that there was money to be made mass-producing search engine-friendly content on the cheap.

But content farming's success may have been its downfall. As the SERPs filled up with articles of dubious value, search engines have fought back. Some went so far as to ban well-known content farms from their indexes.

Banning large, prominent sites is, for obvious reasons, a challenging proposition for Google. But it too has fought back hard against content farms using ts algorithm.

While the verdict is out as to whether it's changes are improving search quality on the world's largest search engine, it appears that some content farmers are adjusting their businesses.

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Publisher tablet revenue growing more meaningful

Investing millions to launch an iPad-only publication may prove to be one of the best ways of making a small fortune from a large fortune, but for traditional publishers that have been hawking their wares on the iPad, Kindle and NOOK, tablets are starting to have an impact.

That's according to two executives from Condé Nast and Hearst who took part in a panel at the American Magazine Conference.

Both indicated that their companies are close to achieving $10m in revenue from tablets.

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Q&A: James Gurd on B2B content marketing

B2B Content Marketing Best Practice GuideE-commerce and digital marketing consultant James Gurd is the author of our new B2B Content Marketing Best Practice Guide, which we've published this week in the build-up to our inaugural FUNNEL event on 1 November in London.

Below, he answers some questions about his 104-page report. 

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The future is mobile, but is your site ready?

The adoption rate of smartphones and tablets has soared in the last 12 months. This trend has ushered in a whole new generation of users that are turning to the web on their mobiles to acquire information that helps them make decisions on the move.

So how is your company catering for them?

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The Daily's iPad-only strategy isn't working

Earlier this year, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. announced that it was making a significant bet on tablet devices.

The bet: that an iPad-only news publication could launch and thrive at a time when many established news publications were struggling to survive.

"New times demand new journalism," Murdoch proclaimed. And with eight figures in investment in The Daily, he stated confidently, "we believe The Daily will be the model for how stories are told and consumed in this digital age".

Half a year later, however, The Daily appears to be off to a slower start than Murdoch may have anticipated.

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Spot instances a double-edged sword for EC2 customers

In late 2009, Amazon introduced a new way for AWS customers to purchase its Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) service: spot instances.

Instead of buying an instance outright at a fixed price, the price of a spot instance is determined by supply and demand.

So long as your bid for the instance is above the current spot price, you have a fully functional Amazon EC2 instance at your disposal.

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