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Posts in Content

Publisher tablet revenue growing more meaningful

Investing millions to launch an iPad-only publication may prove to be one of the best ways of making a small fortune from a large fortune, but for traditional publishers that have been hawking their wares on the iPad, Kindle and NOOK, tablets are starting to have an impact.

That's according to two executives from Condé Nast and Hearst who took part in a panel at the American Magazine Conference.

Both indicated that their companies are close to achieving $10m in revenue from tablets.

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Q&A: James Gurd on B2B content marketing

B2B Content Marketing Best Practice GuideE-commerce and digital marketing consultant James Gurd is the author of our new B2B Content Marketing Best Practice Guide, which we've published this week in the build-up to our inaugural FUNNEL event on 1 November in London.

Below, he answers some questions about his 104-page report. 

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The future is mobile, but is your site ready?

The adoption rate of smartphones and tablets has soared in the last 12 months. This trend has ushered in a whole new generation of users that are turning to the web on their mobiles to acquire information that helps them make decisions on the move.

So how is your company catering for them?

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The Daily's iPad-only strategy isn't working

Earlier this year, Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. announced that it was making a significant bet on tablet devices.

The bet: that an iPad-only news publication could launch and thrive at a time when many established news publications were struggling to survive.

"New times demand new journalism," Murdoch proclaimed. And with eight figures in investment in The Daily, he stated confidently, "we believe The Daily will be the model for how stories are told and consumed in this digital age".

Half a year later, however, The Daily appears to be off to a slower start than Murdoch may have anticipated.

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Spot instances a double-edged sword for EC2 customers

In late 2009, Amazon introduced a new way for AWS customers to purchase its Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) service: spot instances.

Instead of buying an instance outright at a fixed price, the price of a spot instance is determined by supply and demand.

So long as your bid for the instance is above the current spot price, you have a fully functional Amazon EC2 instance at your disposal.

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Amazon readies the Kindle Fire: report

Amazon's Kindle e-reader may be one of the most popular e-readers, but the company's long-term position in the market is far from certain.

On one flank, the Kindle competes with the most popular tablet device, the iPad, and on the other, competitors like Barnes & Noble have built more sophisticated devices like the NOOK Color.

So Amazon is rumored to be responding later this week with a new version of the Kindle that's more like the iPad and NOOK Color.

Dubbed the Kindle Fire, it will reportedly feature a 7" backlit display, books (of course), plenty of magazine subscriptions, and apps to boot.

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AOL asks editors to do marketing and ad sales

In 2007, Tim Armstrong was the head of Google's North American ad sales, making him one of the company's most important and powerful executives.

He was also very interested in local content, and disappointed by the lack of information about his hometown, helped start Patch Media, a company dedicated to building a network of local news and information.

After Armstrong became CEO of AOL in 2009, AOL purchased Patch and started funneling money into the network with plans to establish a footprint in hundreds of cities.

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Google News asks publishers for 'standout' content

For many publishers, Google News is an important source of traffic. This is particularly true for publishers involved in the business of distributing news.

As a result, it's no surprise that a Google SEO strategy for some publishers focuses heavily on Google News.

For those publishers, a new tag introduced by Google to help publishers surface their best content will be of interest.

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Seven reasons why you shouldn’t hire a ghost-tweeter

I believe that if you resort to using a ghost-tweeter to update your Twitter feed then you’re doing it wrong.

Why? Well mainly because I think social media is about customer (or audience) centricity. It is about placing the customer at the very heart of your business, and caring about what they have to say. And as such it has an impact on – and it reflects – organisational culture. 

The brands that are doing social media right are very much focused on listening, sharing, communicating and responding. Outsourcing these tasks is myopic, and it can also be rather dangerous (especially if you fire the ghost-tweeter and fail to change the passwords to your social media accounts).

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Five reasons your job posting is not working

Great businesses depend on great people, and that's particularly true in the tech and digital marketing industries, where many of a company's possible advantages lie in the gray matter of its employees.

When recruiting new hires, many companies turn to job postings to attract a broad, diverse pool of candidates. But the process can be difficult, and many companies struggle to turn job postings into interviews and great hires.

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Google targets undesirable pagination

Pagination, the breaking up of content across multiple pages, is a common practice and in many cases, a product of good design.

After all, there are plenty of cases where pagination creates a more pleasurable, higher-performing user experience.

But pagination isn't always desirable. Some sites, for instance, employ pagination in a questionable attempt to boost page views, and thus ad impressions.

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Is computer-generated content better than content farm content?

Content farming may be a big business, but that doesn't mean that companies in the business of content farming are particularly well-liked.

The questionable quality of content produced by armies of authors paid to crank out search engine-friendly content has, not surprisingly, led Google to crack down on the content farmers.

But the internet is increasingly finding content from a new and perhaps even more controversial source: computers themselves.

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