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Posts in Content

Is Forbes.com the next Huffington Post?

The Huffington Post, with its legion of unpaid contributors, has provided a controversial model for journalism and publishing in the digital age. Despite the controversy, it's hard to argue that the Huffington Post hasn't had some success with its model thus far.

The model has apparently worked well enough to interest stodgy old publishers to get in on the act. According to a tweet from Forbes editor David M. Ewalt, Forbes.com will soon see its own brand of the HuffPo model: standard journalistic fare supplemented with "a level 2 bottom of the pyramid: 1000s of outside contributors."

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Case study: Dell's evolution on Twitter

Dell is one of those companies that has gotten a lot of attention as an early adopter on Twitter. But getting into a new medium early isn't the same as getting the most out of it. Sometime last year, the company realized it had over 20 Twitter accounts. Not all of them were effective.

Speaking at TWTRCON in New York this week, Dell's Stefanie Nelson explained how the company assessed the ROI of its social media efforts and streamlined its productivity in the space.


The impact of data caps on the app economy

iPhone users in the United States have an interesting relationship with their phones: by in large, most of them love their iPhones (and apps) but they don't particularly care for their carrier - AT&T.

AT&T didn't gain any love recently when it announced that it was revamping its iPhone pricing scheme and adding data caps, while 02 has announced the end of unlimited data in the UK. The new deal: lower costs for most users, but no more all-you-can-eat buffet. The goal: attract a new legion of mainstream iPhone customers but limit the profligate, network-harming usage seen with a very small number of customers.


Facebook Like: an online retail case study

Should publishers like Facebook's new Like button? I recently wrote about some of things publishers might not like about it.

One commenter who is a fan of the Like button took issue with them. He asked, "...allow me to ask you whether YOU have quantitatively measured the impact of the five risks that you are warning against?"


For news organizations, business development means turning away business

When the New York Times tried to have Apple pull the plug on the hit iPad news reader, Pulse, I noted that as newspapers like the New York Times attempt to 'save' their businesses, it would be wise of them to figure out how they can work with creative third parties. After all, individuals outside of these organizations may be able to do more for them in some areas than they can currently do for themselves.

But if emails between an online publisher who wanted to license content from Dow Jones is any indication, news organizations may be better at talking about getting paid for their content than they are at actually accepting money from businesses that are ready to pay them.


Bing launches social search, but will anybody use it?

Many expect that search engines will eventually incorporate signals from the realm of social media into the SERPs. There's good reason to believe this: both Google and Microsoft have, for instance, already signed deals with Twitter to access the company's firehose.

But if Bing Social, "the first search experience" based on both the Twitter and Facebook firehoses, is any indication, social search is going to have an uphill battle.


NYT to Apple: pull the plug on Pulse

An iPad news reader app designed by two college students has taken more than a few breaths away. Developed as part of a class at Stanford University’s Institute of Design, Pulse is everything you'd want out of an iPad news reader: it has both form and function.

The user experience is obviously a big reason why the app, which sells for $3.99, quickly became the top-selling iPad app in the App Store. And it's a big reason why Steve Jobs, who was reportedly disappointed with the New York Times' own iPad app, personally highlighted Pulse this week.


Google Caffeine: the most refreshing Google update ever for SEOs?

Need a Caffeine boost? After much anticipation and discussion, Google's latest 'big update' is officially here.

Unlike many major Google updates, which include alterations to the factors Google uses to rank pages, Caffeine instead represents an update to Google's web indexing system. The result: Google says Caffeine "provides 50 percent fresher results for web searches than our last index."


AOL's CEO wants to cure journalism's technophobia

AOL's CEO Tim Armstrong has been at the company for over a year now. As he readily admits, AOL has a long way to go before it will be able to stop depending on its slowly depleting dial-up revenues. But on stage at CMSummit in New York on Tuesday, Armstrong highlighted a key point of his strategy. Journalism is technologically challenged. AOL's trying to change that.


How to save journalism? The FTC thinks there's a tax for that

Journalism, apparently, is in trouble. The once-dominant financiers of journalism -- newspapers -- are dying. And while some see hope in new media, the harsh reality is that journalism's woes have less to do with distribution mediums and more to do with business models.

That's because the kind of journalism that is threatened is expensive, and even online, there aren't too many business models that can support it. So what should we do?


Publishers, group commerce and private sales: a match made in heaven?

Yesterday, Sugar Inc., an online publisher focused on women's media, purchased FreshGuide, a group buying startup similar in nature to Groupon.

According to Sugar Inc. CEO Brian Sugar, the purchase was a no-brainer for his media company: "We believe the winning business model for next generation media companies must include diverse revenue streams...we believe that FreshGuide will provide local advertisers the ability to advertise to Sugar's large audience in a high-quality and cost-effective manner."


Five reasons not to like Facebook's 'Like' button

If the numbers are any indication, publishers really like Facebook's new Like button. But should they?

For obvious reasons, Facebook is attractive to publishers, and it wants to keep it that way. It provides publishers with plenty of tools that they can use to bring Facebook-driven experiences to their websites. The Like button is one of the newest offerings for publishers but there are several reasons publishers may want to think twice about putting it on their pages.