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Posts in Content

Bloomberg's Federal Reserve lawsuit highlights the importance of news organizations

In the debate over the future of journalism, there are some who argue that stodgy old news organizations aren't necessary. Leaner and meaner ventures can take on the same burdens. Citizen journalists and bloggers are capable journalists.

But a victory for Bloomberg LP in a lawsuit against the United States Federal Reserve highlights the importance of having large news organizations.

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Q&A: Rex Hammock, Founder & CEO of Hammock Inc.

There's a lot of talk about the future of magazines, and print media in general, because there's a lot to talk about. When it comes to discussing what the future holds, Rex Hammock is one of the guys you want to speak to.

He's a veteran "magazine guy" who co-founded the Custom Publishing Council, served as a director of the American Business Media trade association and is today the CEO of custom media firm Hammock Inc. His recent guest column in Publishing Executive entitled "9 Things I've Learned About Magazines by Blogging" piqued my interest so I decided to ask Rex about the state of the magazine industry, what the internet means to print publishers today, the pay walls that are coming up and what blogging might look like a decade from now.

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Q&A: Erik Proulx on his documentary 'Lemonade' and life after ad layoffs

After getting laid off by ad agency Arnold last fall, copywriter Erik Proulx took to the web, creating a job-search site for recently unemployed advertising professionals and chronicling their stories on Please Feed The Animals.

Production company Picture Park took an interest in his work and soon Proulx' interviews turned into a film. The resulting documentary, "Lemonade," focuses on 15 people who were laid off (including himself) and is set to premiere in the fall.

I caught up with Proulx to talk about what his recent unemployment has taught him about the economy, the ad industry and life after layoffs.

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The importance of visual affordance in hyperlink design

A slightly disturbing new trend seems to be happening in the world of interface design, requiring people to move their mouse around to tell what is a link and what is not.

When you start messing around with the basic building block of the web - the hyperlink – trouble is sure to follow.

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Corporate blogs and other bad habits

"We need to be on Twitter," cries the CEO. But for how long, and what will it do to the brand long term?

The consistent cry from boards and management interested in the Internet is the always 'the latest thing'. Today, it's Twitter. But the Internet has bad habits. It keeps check of what you do. It crawls, catalogues and communicates all the past 'latest things'.

That's right. Those things. Those 'not latest' things. The things you were doing yesterday. They are still there.

See, social media isn't a campaign. It's a habit.

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Why you need to create video for the web

Advertising revenue is down, newspapers are struggling and as the economy takes a downturn production costs are up, at the same time online readership and revenue continue to rise. So what's the answer? Go where the eyes are.

Whether you are writing, taking pictures, shooting video or recording audio you can build communities with your content. But only if you take it online.

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One social network turns a profit by...charging users

Consumers don't like paying for anything online. This is especially true when it comes to younger consumers. Common knowledge, right?

Wrong. Just ask myYearbook, a second-tier social network that caters primarily to teens. It has managed to do something many other social networks haven't: turn a profit. And it's done it by charging its supposedly frugal Gen Y users.

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Five easy ways to make your business website more social

Social media is an increasingly important part of the internet. But many businesses are still trying to decipher what it's really all about and how it can relate to their bottom lines. Naturally, not everyone is jumping on the bandwagon and throwing all their resources at Twitter, Facebook, et. al.

The truth is that for many businesses social media makes sense -- in moderate doses. If you're a small business owner, chances are you don't need to hire a full-time social media manager and the only thing social you're likely to get from social media experts is a lot of smooth-talk.

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The five biggest paid content myths

There's a lot of talk about paid content these days for obvious reasons and there's only going to be more of it now that Rupert Murdoch has announced plans for News Corp. to go all in.

One of the reasons there's so much debate over paid content is that there are a lot of misconceptions and myths about paid content. As someone who has run paid content websites for years, I thought I'd share the five biggest paid content myths I frequently hear mentioned in discussions about paid content.

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Will open standards win out in the e-book wars?

Proprietary formats and lock-in. When it comes to discussions of digital content, these are terms you really can't escape.

A lot of that has to do with the evolution of digital content, which arguably hasn't gone much smoother than human evolution. On one side, we've seen many content owners fight the 'digitization' of their content, contributing to rampant piracy and consumer dissatisfaction. On one side, we've seen hardware and software vendors take advantage of the chaos to push proprietary formats that lock consumers into their hardware and software offerings.

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Does social media really deserve more love in the SERPs?

In my post earlier this week about Google Caffeine, I made the observation that certain Facebook Pages seemed to have received quite a rankings boost. I also noted some comments about Twitter pages receiving a boost as well.

As more and more people give Caffeine a whirl, the increased prominence of results from the social media sphere appears to be a widespread phenomenon.

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Blogging is back, thanks to Posterous

Posterous FTWWe’ve heard lots of talk about the death of blogs and blogging, with fingers invariably pointed at the likes of Twitter and Facebook. The truth is a bit more straightforward. Blogging was never really as big as everybody said it was.

Well, here’s the good news: blogging is back. Except now it’s called microblogging. And it’s great.

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