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Posts in Content

6 questions to ask when choosing CMS for your e-commerce platform

A CMS is just about content so it doesn’t need much attention, right? Wrong. In an e-commerce environment CMS means so much more than being able to edit and publish content.

E-commerce pages have dynamic content served by code and this content can change depending on the visitor session; given such variation, how can you weave static content into dynamic pages without screwing the display?

As the sophistication of consumers and online technology has risen, so have the demands on e-commerce managers to understand which tools are the best-fit for the business. Having worked on many CMS implementations and seen the pitfalls, I thought I’d share some advice on what questions you need to be asking.

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Guardian to bloggers: please post our content on your blog

Content from major newspapers and news wires is often popular fodder for blogs large and small. Many, if not most, major news organizations have not, however, been enthused by the (fair) use of their content by bloggers.

But The Guardian has another message for bloggers: take our content and post it on your blog, please.

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Blockbuster on the verge of defeat in battle against Netflix, technology

Once-dominant video rental chain Blockbuster is trying its hardest to prove that it can compete in the 21st century. It is closing down stores, and has been bulking up its on-demand offering.

But it looks like it may be too little, too late. Last Thursday, the New York Stock Exchange announced that the company would be delisted from the exchange after the company failed to win shareholder approval for a measure that would boost the company's stock price above $1, the exchange's minimum. More often than not, a company's delisting is signal of impending demise.

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Great news: websites are completely free to run

A massive WTF moment interrupted my reading of The Observer's review of the paywall going up around the Times and Sunday Times.

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Tesco failing to deliver relevant emails

It has the most extensive loyalty scheme and probably the biggest database in the UK. The company is not short of cash either, as it accounts for something like one in every seven pounds spent in the UK.

So Tesco must have the clout to talk to their customers relevantly as individuals through email...surely?

33 comments

Is Flash a fit for mobiles? We'll soon find out

In April, Apple CEO Steve Jobs explained in detail why consumers aren't going to see Flash support on the iPhone and iPad. Long story short: Adobe Flash "is no longer necessary." Although Apple's lack of support for Flash is often cited as an iPhone/iPad drawback, Flash certainly isn't going to win a whole lot of popularity contests either. But the question remains: is there a place for Flash in the mobile market?

We may soon have an answer.

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BP's internet response: the good, the bad, the ugly

The Gulf of Mexico oil spill that has oil giant BP scrambling to save its brand -- and possibly its entire business -- has been juicy fodder for those involved in PR and marketing. Of particular interest: how the company is responding to the onslaught online.

From crisis communications experts to social media gurus, just about everyone has suggestions for BP. But what about BP's internet strategy overall? I decided it was worth a high-level look at the company's efforts to stem the tide of online criticism.

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Flickr partners with Getty Images for user-licensed photos

Snap the perfect photo that you're uploading to Flickr? Find the perfect photo on Flickr for an article you're writing? Thanks to an expanded relationship between Flickr and Getty Images, licensing that perfect Flickr photo is now a lot easier.

Based on the apparent success of the Flickr Collection on Getty Images, the companies have launched a new 'Request to License' program that could significantly expand the pool of Flickr photos that are available for licensing.

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WordPress 3.0: proof open source kicks butt

WordPress is one of the most popular open-source content management systems in use on the internet. But despite WordPress' popularity, one knock against it has been the fact that it's always been more a  'blogging engine' than 'true' CMS.

Yesterday, WordPress took a big step toward achieving 'true' CMS status with the release of WordPress 3.0. That's thanks to several of the new features it contains.

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Is Forbes.com the next Huffington Post?

The Huffington Post, with its legion of unpaid contributors, has provided a controversial model for journalism and publishing in the digital age. Despite the controversy, it's hard to argue that the Huffington Post hasn't had some success with its model thus far.

The model has apparently worked well enough to interest stodgy old publishers to get in on the act. According to a tweet from Forbes editor David M. Ewalt, Forbes.com will soon see its own brand of the HuffPo model: standard journalistic fare supplemented with "a level 2 bottom of the pyramid: 1000s of outside contributors."

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Case study: Dell's evolution on Twitter

Dell is one of those companies that has gotten a lot of attention as an early adopter on Twitter. But getting into a new medium early isn't the same as getting the most out of it. Sometime last year, the company realized it had over 20 Twitter accounts. Not all of them were effective.

Speaking at TWTRCON in New York this week, Dell's Stefanie Nelson explained how the company assessed the ROI of its social media efforts and streamlined its productivity in the space.

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The impact of data caps on the app economy

iPhone users in the United States have an interesting relationship with their phones: by in large, most of them love their iPhones (and apps) but they don't particularly care for their carrier - AT&T.

AT&T didn't gain any love recently when it announced that it was revamping its iPhone pricing scheme and adding data caps, while 02 has announced the end of unlimited data in the UK. The new deal: lower costs for most users, but no more all-you-can-eat buffet. The goal: attract a new legion of mainstream iPhone customers but limit the profligate, network-harming usage seen with a very small number of customers.

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