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Posts in Content

Does social media really deserve more love in the SERPs?

In my post earlier this week about Google Caffeine, I made the observation that certain Facebook Pages seemed to have received quite a rankings boost. I also noted some comments about Twitter pages receiving a boost as well.

As more and more people give Caffeine a whirl, the increased prominence of results from the social media sphere appears to be a widespread phenomenon.

2 comments

Blogging is back, thanks to Posterous

Posterous FTWWe’ve heard lots of talk about the death of blogs and blogging, with fingers invariably pointed at the likes of Twitter and Facebook. The truth is a bit more straightforward. Blogging was never really as big as everybody said it was.

Well, here’s the good news: blogging is back. Except now it’s called microblogging. And it’s great.

6 comments

Toyota launches a Twitter-oriented microsite, buys (?) a sponsored definition

Can brands build unique experiences for consumers around Twitter? Toyota is giving it a shot with a new Twitter-oriented microsite called Harmony Tweets that is being used to promote the Prius.

The microsite was built by Federated Media, which has over time gone from an ad rep to a "conversational marketing" agency.

2 comments

Journalism's challenge: pageview economics

This weekend, the Washington Post's Ian Shapira detailed in a piece entitled "The Death of Journalism (Gawker Edition)" how the triumph he felt when Gawker blogged about a story he wrote turned into anger after his boss asked him why he wasn't angry that his story had been stolen.

After reviewing Gawker's eight-paragraph post, Shapira came to the same conclusion as his boss: he'd been ripped off.

4 comments

The Wall Street Journal takes aim at LinkedIn with WSJ Connect

As newspapers struggle to turn a profit in the digital economy, the Wall Street Journal has had one small advantage in the battle for monetization: people don't mind subscribing for their content. But The Journal isn't expecting that to be a sulver bullet long term strategy.

Like every other print publication, they are looking beyond ad dollars and subscription fees to make money. And their newest attempt is a business focused social network.

In 2007, there were rumors that News Corp. was trying to buy resume building social network LinkedIn and now it looks like the company is looking to go it alone.

4 comments

Memo to swinish publishers: pagination sucks

Memo to swinish publishers: pagination sucksQuestion: why must news sites like Reuters split their stories over multiple pages? Is it because they’re desperate, misguided, hate readers, and are aiming to further commoditise their ad revenues?

Publishers need to be called out for pulling this dirty trick on unwitting visitors. It is aimed at doing one thing: boosting page impressions. After all, why settle for just one page impression when you can have many?

Well, it needs saying: publishers that give a shit about readers and advertisers simply do not do this. The way I see it, only those publishers that want to artificially inflate page impressions and loathe their readers adopt pagination.

It's a swinish technique...

9 comments

When did advertising become more important than published content?

An incident happened last week — I tweeted a caustic expletive directed at DoubleClick knowing that only my tribe would read the invective. What realization occurred that would have me throw political correctness out the window? It was the moment when I realized DoubleClick behaved as if their advertising was more important, perhaps more desirable, than the actual published content that I had clicked to experience. Or, maybe the ad platform/producer just isn’t aware of how their technology rubs up against other technologies...

11 comments

Finding the right subscription model at the NYT

By all appearances, the question isn't whether the New York Times will revisit paid subscriptions. The question is what those subscriptions will look like.

Last week, Gawker published documents purporting to detail two possible online subscription packages the newspaper company is mulling over, New York Times Silver and Gold.

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The A-to-Z of online copywriting

The A-to-Z of online copywritingOnline copywriting can make all the difference between a website that engages and converts, and one that stagnates. 

Words communicate to your visitors and influence actions (both positively and negatively). Furthermore, good copy is, as far as the search engines are concerned, the food of the Gods. Words are to Google what oxygen is to you and me.

So I thought I’d try to nail an A-to-Z of online copywriting. As ever, these recommendations are guidelines, rather than firm rules. They're broadly applicable to web copywriters and bloggers, as well as journalists who have their work published online. I hope it makes for a handy bookmark-friendly checklist...

20 comments

Social media: myth versus reality

The nature of the internet economy has given myth new importance in the digital age. One need only look at the field of SEO to see just how prominent (and destructive) myth can be.

Social media has a lot in common with SEO and one area where that's especially true is in the number of social media myths that have become entrenched. From the belief that social media ROI can't be measured to the idea that your business can thrive if you get to the right influencers, social media myths run rampant today.

15 comments

Q&A: Loren Bendele on online couponing and the recession

As the recession barrels on, bargain businesses are seeing strong growth. One of those is the field of online coupons, which has seen tremendous expansion as consumers tighten their purse strings.

In the past few months of the economic downturn, searches for discounts and deals have risen online. Starting in January, 54% of consumers polled by ComScore classified online couponing sites as important to their shopping process. More than half of consumers say they are using coupons more often than even just a few months ago. 31% are using onilne coupon sites. That's an increase of 25% according to Hitwise. In July, searches for generic coupons were up 172% from the same time last year and searches for retailer-specific coupons increased 34%.

We caught up with Savings.com CEO Loren Bendele to discuss the coupon resurgence this year and where it's headed online.

2 comments

Do publishing woes increase revenue at ad networks?

The overwhelming supply of display advertising online has had a downward effect on price. But new research shows that ad rates at ad networks has risen since the start of 2009.

Is that good news or bad for publishers? Well, it depends on how you look at it.

1 comment