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Posts in Content

Q&A: Broadersheet.com CEO Peter Clark

Earlier today I wrote about whether a news aggregator could be a success in the UK. Prospects are not good, and even Briton Nick Denton, founder of Gawker.com, says he wouldn't dare do it.

However, despite the pessimism, there exists an interest in giving it a try. The first major entrant into the UK news aggregation scene looks to be Cambridge-based Broadersheet.com.

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Will Chris Anderson's publisher profit from "Free"?

How do you sell hardcovers for $26.99 when your book argues that information wants to be free? When you're Chris Anderson, you give away "Free: The Future of a Radical Price" online.

Anderson takes issue with critics — most notably so far Malcolm Gladwell — who think his book argues that "information wants to be free." According to Anderson, "Some information wants to be free. And some information wants to be really expensive."

And the "LongTail" author and Wired editor is hoping that while readers can access the online version of his book for free, they'll still want to pay to read the book in hardcover form.

The strategy stands to gain Anderson some points in the attention economy for walking his talk of free, but will his publisher make any money giving away his goods for free?

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Why Hulu works. For now.

Video portal Hulu has come a long way since it was colloquially known as "Clown Co.” The website has since gotten a real name, design raves and 10% of the online video ad market.

And as video sites like YouTube struggle to bring in ad revenue and portals like Joost shutter, Hulu's network supported business model seems even stronger.

Today The New York Times discusses the reasons why Hulu works. Mostly, it's because they just throw network content up on the Internet unscathed.

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And you wonder why no-one buys from you

For many, when it comes to writing product descriptions for their e-commerce website, it is a one-way ticket to Boresville! You can tell they'd rather have their teeth pulled, Orin Scrivello style, than sit down and write some copy that sells (heck, even more easier than just to go and control-c some competitors copy, right?)

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Twitter DM autoresponders: 15 tips and 40+ examples

Twitter DM autoresponders: 15 tips and 40+ examplesTwitter autoresponders are used to automatically send a direct message to new followers. All too often they are lame, and perceived as spammy.

Auto messages are problematic, not least because even when they include elements of the ‘personal’ (“how can I help you today?” / “tell me more about yourself”) they’re clearly robotic. And people don’t respond to robots, they respond to people. This is 'social' media after all.

I don’t use them, nor have we configured our Econsultancy Twitter account to send automated messages, but we’ve been wondering whether they can be used in a positive way. As such I have been doing a little research in this area. And I'd love to hear your feedback...

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5 ways to get people to pay for your content online

Paid content and subscription services are hot once again thanks to an economic downturn that has reminded online publishers that ad revenues are not impervious.

But paid content isn't easy online (newspapers can attest to that) and many publishers inevitably fail at making the transition from free to paid. Here are several ways you can boost your chances of succeeding when selling content online.

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When disclosure isn't enough

Disclosure is a touchy subject when it comes to blogging and digital journalism. Most of the time, the debate is centered on when disclosure is necessary. But what happens when disclosure isn't enough?

As I was going through my feed reader yesterday, I came across a post on Silicon Alley Insider (SAI) that serves as the perfect example of why a debate about journalistic ethics and standards online can't be limited to the topic of disclosure.

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Is The Pirate Bay going legit?

If there was any group of individuals that you would expect to fight copyright holders to the bloody end, the people behind The Pirate Bay (TPB) were it. But apparently, a costly legal defeat can really take the wind out of just about any pirate's sails.

According to a press release issued today, the owners of TBP have sold TBP to publicly-traded software company Global Gaming Factory X (GGF) for $7.8m and GGF "intends to launch new business models that allow compensation to the content providers and copyright owners".

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Comcast to offer free content online — to paid subscribers

Comcast and Time Warner are pairing up to offer more of their content for free online — to people who already subscribe to their cable channels on television. Starting in July, the cable companies will let a group of about 5,000 subscribers access that content online.

The new model will make it harder for people to access television content online for free. And while cable companies will not yet be able to monetize online viewing as profitably as they do offline, the migration of their content online should help them get a foot in the door for charging for that content down the road.

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The limitations of linkbait

Linkbait. It's sort of like foie gras and champagne. Even if it's not your favorite meal, chances are most consumers won't turn it down.

But as a website owner, is linkbait the meal you should be preparing every day?

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Changing consumers, challenging times

As consumers, we are all extraordinarily powerful these days. The wonderful web offers us the chance to hunt out the very best bargains, to research our purchases thoroughly and to read up on what other consumers have to say about products.

It's an excellent time to be a shopper and service user, but for retailers and service providers this presents many new challenges. Some businesses have embraced the way the web has transformed their customer base but others have been slow in catching up.

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Did you ChaCha with "Angels and Demons"?

What's the appeal of entertaining mobile answer services? For example, were you one of the almost North American 500 mobile ChaCha text questioners wanting to know the running time for "Angels and Demons"?  If so, why?  Are we so busy that we would choose a movie based on its running time?

The nifty thing about ChaCha (tagline: ur mobile bff) is it isn't mobile-only.  You can visit the website to query the types of questions submitted and read the responses.  Following, are some of the more interesting queries about "Angels and Demons": 

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