{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts in Content

Newspapers get hip to duplicate content issues

Duplicate content can be a real SEO killer. For obvious reasons, search engines pay close attention to duplicate content and online publishers risk having duplicate content 'filtered' out.

While Google and other search engines are pretty good at identifying original sources and widespread acceptance of the canonical tag should eventually help, for online publishers who syndicate prolifically, dealing with duplicate content issues can be a challenge.

1 comment

WordPress attack catches bloggers off guard, but it shouldn't have

Over the weekend, reports surfaced of a seemingly widespread attack targeting older versions of the popular blogging software WordPress. The attack leaves WordPress installations severely compromised and appears to be part of a campaign to spread spam and malicious code.

Numerous bloggers found themselves victims. One of those bloggers was popular tech personality Robert Scoble. He claims that two months of his blog's content was lost and that his site was booted from Google's index because of malicious code that had been inserted (ouch).


The 5 things Twitter must do to avoid #fail

How popular is Twitter? It's so popular that some would suggest it's worth billions of dollars. But as many of us who lived through the first .com bust know all too well, it's disappointingly easy to take something that looks like it has a future filled with success and turn it into fail.

In the case of Twitter, I think there are 5 things that the company's management needs to do to avoid that fate.


Five swinish ways publishers put pageviews above people

For online publishers dependent on advertising, few things are as important as pageviews because more pageviews tends to equal more dollars. There's nothing inherently wrong with attempting to boost these numbers; it's to be expected.

But not all pageviews are generated equally. There are a number of swinish techniques online publishers use to inflate the number of views.


Is RSS dead?

Yesterday, ZDNet's Sam Diaz called RSS a "Web 1.0 tool" and voiced the opinion that "there are better ways now". He noted a Forrester Research study showing that only 9% of adults in the US use an RSS reader monthly -- a 2% drop from 2008.

Diaz's comments were in response to a Google blog post announcing the release of the second annual Google Reader Power Readers, a collection of the sites various influential individuals call their favorites.


Bloomberg's Federal Reserve lawsuit highlights the importance of news organizations

In the debate over the future of journalism, there are some who argue that stodgy old news organizations aren't necessary. Leaner and meaner ventures can take on the same burdens. Citizen journalists and bloggers are capable journalists.

But a victory for Bloomberg LP in a lawsuit against the United States Federal Reserve highlights the importance of having large news organizations.


Q&A: Rex Hammock, Founder & CEO of Hammock Inc.

There's a lot of talk about the future of magazines, and print media in general, because there's a lot to talk about. When it comes to discussing what the future holds, Rex Hammock is one of the guys you want to speak to.

He's a veteran "magazine guy" who co-founded the Custom Publishing Council, served as a director of the American Business Media trade association and is today the CEO of custom media firm Hammock Inc. His recent guest column in Publishing Executive entitled "9 Things I've Learned About Magazines by Blogging" piqued my interest so I decided to ask Rex about the state of the magazine industry, what the internet means to print publishers today, the pay walls that are coming up and what blogging might look like a decade from now.


Q&A: Erik Proulx on his documentary 'Lemonade' and life after ad layoffs

After getting laid off by ad agency Arnold last fall, copywriter Erik Proulx took to the web, creating a job-search site for recently unemployed advertising professionals and chronicling their stories on Please Feed The Animals.

Production company Picture Park took an interest in his work and soon Proulx' interviews turned into a film. The resulting documentary, "Lemonade," focuses on 15 people who were laid off (including himself) and is set to premiere in the fall.

I caught up with Proulx to talk about what his recent unemployment has taught him about the economy, the ad industry and life after layoffs.


The importance of visual affordance in hyperlink design

A slightly disturbing new trend seems to be happening in the world of interface design, requiring people to move their mouse around to tell what is a link and what is not.

When you start messing around with the basic building block of the web - the hyperlink – trouble is sure to follow.


Corporate blogs and other bad habits

"We need to be on Twitter," cries the CEO. But for how long, and what will it do to the brand long term?

The consistent cry from boards and management interested in the Internet is the always 'the latest thing'. Today, it's Twitter. But the Internet has bad habits. It keeps check of what you do. It crawls, catalogues and communicates all the past 'latest things'.

That's right. Those things. Those 'not latest' things. The things you were doing yesterday. They are still there.

See, social media isn't a campaign. It's a habit.


Why you need to create video for the web

Advertising revenue is down, newspapers are struggling and as the economy takes a downturn production costs are up, at the same time online readership and revenue continue to rise. So what's the answer? Go where the eyes are.

Whether you are writing, taking pictures, shooting video or recording audio you can build communities with your content. But only if you take it online.


One social network turns a profit by...charging users

Consumers don't like paying for anything online. This is especially true when it comes to younger consumers. Common knowledge, right?

Wrong. Just ask myYearbook, a second-tier social network that caters primarily to teens. It has managed to do something many other social networks haven't: turn a profit. And it's done it by charging its supposedly frugal Gen Y users.