For many of us Twitter is now a core part of our daily lives. Despite this there remains no sign of ‘Twitter Pro’, for professional users, though its API is used by developers to create the kind of tools that help us to manage our accounts more easily. 

Many tools have emerged to plug gaps in Twitter’s functionality, some of which we have written about in the past. So far this year I’ve started to use a few new ones, as highlighted below. Do check them out.

Slipstre.am

Slipstre.am is a plug-in for Chrome that allows you to hide certain status updates on Twitter. 

For example, if like me you think Foursquare-based tweets are irrelevant, then simply add ‘Foursquare’ and / or ‘4sq.com’ as a term. You can also mute specific users.

The tool works directly with Twitter.com and provides a much-needed filter for unwanted noise.

Mute.ly

If you’re just looking for a simple tool that mutes a Twitter user then here it is.

Buffer

A brilliant scheduling tool for Twitter. Rather than sharing lots of content in a short space of time, you can click the Buffer bookmarklet to add it to your tweeting schedule. Tweets will then be staggered. You can plug in your Bit.ly account to use a custom domain and monitor analytics. I’m a big fan of Buffer.

 

PostPost

A tool that helps you to discover interesting tweets that might otherwise have been buried. PostPost identifies standout content from the people you follow, and aggregates it on one page (embedding watchable videos and full size images, as opposed to links). Useful for those days when you’re too busy to properly tune into Twitter.

Tweetwally

A neat tool for creating a ‘tweetwall’. Choose hashtags, keywords or users and Tweetwally will display them on a dedicated web page. Your tweetwall can be embedded onto your own website. 

There are a number of other tools on the verge of being released but which are currently in closed beta, so I’ll wait until they’re available to the masses before writing about them. I’ll publish another post in due course.

Do you have any other new tools – a preferably free ones – to suggest?