GDPR Essentials For Marketers Courses

Programme

The online course is split across three themes:

  • The GDPR law and what it is
  • What the changes mean for your organisation
  • The implications for each channel or activity within marketing.

Each section comprises of seven video modules with key readings delivered on our award winning Online Classroom learning platform (AOP Digital Publishing Awards: Best Media Technology Partner 2017).

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What will I learn?

GDPR Essentials is delivered completely online and takes about 14 hours to complete. It’s designed for you to study at your own pace with 30-days access to the course content.

You’ll cover the following topics:

  • Introduction to GDPR
  • What GDPR does: key principles
  • What GDPR means in practice
  • Practical tips
  • Demonstrating compliance
  • Channel implications
  • The next step: Key questions you should be asking

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