Fiverr.com is a US website that allows sellers to post services they offer for a fixed price of $5. Sellers post “gigs” on Fiverr that visitors can search for, order, and pay for using PayPal.

There’s a wide variety of “gigs” on Fiverr including sellers offering illustrations, flyers, Facebook pages, optimised landing pages, comedy voicemails and even financial consulting.

Sellers have ratings and reviews to help you understand the quality of the work offered, you can also browse previous examples of work for further reassurance.

Surely though the motto “you get what you pay for” comes to mind and this is exactly what I thought. If you’re going to pay $5 (£3.46 at today’s exchange rate) you’re not exactly going to get a seller who is overly enthusiastic to design you a fantastic logo. Or are you?

Case study: Fiverr

This article is a case study showing the process I went through to get a logo designed for £3.46.

The internet now has a host of services allowing you to outsource anything from SEO to content marketing. Many companies will charge a pretty penny for their services but with Fiverr you can do a lot with just a few quid. 

I will design two eye catching logos within 24 hours for $5 

This is the “gig” I saw, after a quick review of the seller’s work and ratings I ordered and paid for the service via PayPal. It was afterall only £3.46 so it wasn’t exactly a hard sell.

After being redirected to a secure PayPal payment page I was prompted to go back to Fiverr and saw a message that my seller needs information regarding my recent order. I click the link and this is what I see:

Delivery in about eight hours it says. Not bad, not bad at all. I reply back with the necessary information and get an instant reply confirming the date of delivery.

My new logo

I wake up the next day and check my email, there’s a message from Fiverr saying the seller has delivered my work. I’m intrigued to see what I’ve bought for the measly sum of £3.46. I click the link on the email and it brings up the seller’s reply to the conversation above.

There are, as promised, two logos attached including a bonus copy of the second addition in different colours. I’m impressed, the first one looks great and there’s a nice message from the seller saying if I want a free revision I can just reply to the message.

I open up the logos for further inspection and think it would be nice to have a white version of the first logo. I also notice there is a .png version missing.

I reply back to the seller and ask for the revision and missing file. Within 12 hours the seller replies to my revision request with the goods.

An amazing service and free revision for £3.46

So there you have it, for less than the price of a jar of coffee I was provided with two versions of logos of which one I had revised for free. I’m left with a high quality, good looking, professional logo in two different colours. I have the source file (.psd) and two different image files (.jpeg and .png).

If you want to learn more about the particular seller I used you can view their work here.

I wonder what I would’ve paid a design agency in London for this?