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Well over 50% of Mail Online readers will come to the home page from mobile devices in five years time, according to publisher Martin Clarke.

Speaking at the opening keynote speech at ad:tech this morning, Clarke said of its 2.3m global week-day direct daily visitors to the home page, 500,000 come via a mobile browser (25%), and on top of that 0.4m view content via one of its mobile apps.

“So if you tally that up that’s 2.7m people in total and nearly 1m of those are mobile visitors,” said Clarke.

He was keen to point out that Mail Online is much more focused on the proportion of daily visitors that come directly to the home page, rather than those that are redirected from somewhere like Google, as they are ten to 12 times more engaged.

“Indirect visitors are important too as that’s how we grow, but the real measure of success and the engine of the business is the 60% of daily visitors that come straight to the home page,” he added.

He reckons mobile advertising has the potential to make higher yields than online in future, particularly with the increase of geo-targeted ads, plus he said click through and interaction is already higher.

But as it is still a relatively new medium he said, “Advertisers have not quite woken up to the potential of mobile. We are making good revenue but in future it will become vastly more important, particularly with location based ads…We can also provide richer feedback on mobile customers.

“We’re just at the beginning of the mobile experience. It’s going to be massively exciting… and it will be great to serve video ads and content [on too].”

In addition to mobile, Clarke said the other big changer for the Mail Online business will be video as there is more demand for video advertising. The publisher is now looking to produce more video content, and it has also seen more demand for video from consumers.

Mail Online is now in the process of redesigning its website, having last done so four years ago, and in doing so will plan ahead for the next generation of devices and browser software.


Published 19 September, 2012 by NMA Staff

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