{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

The ubiquity of smartphones has enabled online publishers to harness the power of user-generated content with emerging services such as Scoopshot cashing in on the trend.

The Finnish-based outfit has launched a mobile app that lets users effectively become ‘citizen journalists’ by uploading their content to the Scoopshot service along with a narrative of the shot.

Users can then set the price they want to sell their image for, (see video below), as well as the terms and conditions of the sale which can then be accessed by whichever publication is willing to meet said criteria.

With over 160,000 users of the app across 177 countries, Scoopshot has over 50 partnerships with media organisations including Metro in Europe, the Americas and Asia – although not to be confused with its UK namesake.

Images can be paparazzi-style shots of celebrities, natural occurrences or accidents, with participating media outlets also able to issue briefs, or “tasks,” to the 160,000 potential photographers.

Source: Scoopshot

Scoopshot CEO Niko Ruokosuo told new media age the service is a more legally sound method of acquiring images than potentially crowd-sourcing them from Twitter or Facebook.

As when a media outlet acquires an image from Scoopshot it is covered by copyright law – this is not always the case when sourcing images via a social network – with the service giving users a quick legal FAQ run-through during sign up.

Plus photographers are also rewarded financially for their efforts with one user reported to have earned over $19,000 (£12,000) from Scoopshot.

With under 20 employees globally Scoopshot can effectively be described as a marketplace for media outlets and images and is meeting with UK publishers to broaden its footprint both in terms of partnerships and popular take-up.

Ruokosuo also explained the potential for brands to use Scoopshot as a means of co-creation.

For instance, a brand can ask users to submit images of their product/campaign via the service in a bid to gauge popular opinion of them, according to Ruokosuo.


Scoopshot Introduction


Published 23 November, 2012 by NMA Staff

50335 more posts from this author

Comments (0)

Save or Cancel