Latin America and the Caribbean

Three’s a crowd: how first-party data builds customer relationships

Three’s a crowd, and I’m not referring to failed 80s sitcoms. I’m talking about customer relationships.

Yet according to a study by the UC Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, 85% of the top 1,000 websites have cookies set by a third party.

Propelled by widespread anonymity in the early days of the Internet, third-party cookies have undoubtedly become a staple for many marketers, tracking consumer behaviors across the web with the promise of uncovering invaluable insights.

Not only is this an invasion of consumer privacy (more on that later), but it also prevents businesses from truly knowing and understanding their customers.

First-party data, transparently collected via voluntary user registration, on-site activities and interactions, removes data brokers as middlemen, establishing direct brand and consumer connections and fostering 1:1 relationships.

Let’s take a look at three ways that third-party cookies are hurting your customer relationships, and how first-party data can be collected and used to improve audience understanding and user experiences.

How does internationalisation work for online retailers?

If 95% of success is showing up then in online retail business the arrival of good platforms, cheap translation services and global banking means pretty much anyone can ‘show up’.

The service can be transferred into the new market, the website translated, the new currency added and you’re ready to sell to the new region.

Why Facebook bought WhatsApp

A lot of people wondered why Facebook paid so much money for WhatsApp.

WhatsApp is 100% social, and you don’t have companies in your phone book. Many companies and online services would love to send you messages in your WhatsApp box while it’s free messaging. But they can’t.

What if customers could drop their mobile number at any online site or mobile app via their Facebook login and stay in control over the permission they gave you as a service?

Customers can even withdraw their permission before you even send a message. This is my take on what Facebook could do.