tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/reports Research from Econsultancy 2017-11-13T17:17:00+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4653 2017-11-13T17:17:00+00:00 2017-11-13T17:17:00+00:00 Lush: A Fresh Approach to Customer Experiences <p>This report considers handmade cosmetics business Lush. It focuses on how the company’s <strong>embrace of social</strong>, new tech and <strong>ecommerce platform</strong> have enabled its rise and established it as one of the UK’s most loved brands.</p> <p>The brand is characterised by its commitment to making beauty products with natural, ethically sourced ingredients that are not tested on animals. This approach has resonated with a <strong>new generation of customers</strong>, resulting in increased sales and profit. </p> <p>For a business that reportedly doesn't invest in global advertising, this is an impressive accomplishment. How did this independent brand reach such heights in such a short amount of time? This report considers Lush's <strong>'un-marketing' philosophy</strong> and takes a look at what lessons retailers can learn from the brand's approach to content and social.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>How Lush maintains its strong brand identity and engages a new generation of shoppers with social media</li> <li>Lessons retailers can learn from Lush’s ecommerce platform and content strategy</li> <li>How the brand’s investment in new technology aims to bridge the gap between the online and offline customer experience.</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-10-31T11:33:00+00:00 2017-10-31T11:33:00+00:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Sector-specific data and reports are also available:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a><br></strong></li> <li><strong><strong><a title="Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/financial-services-and-insurance-internet-statistics-compendium/">Financial Services and Insurance</a></strong></strong></li> <li> <strong><a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a></strong><strong> </strong> </li> <li><strong><a title="Retail Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/retail-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Retail</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Travel Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/travel-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Travel</a></strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4639 2017-10-30T12:00:00+00:00 2017-10-30T12:00:00+00:00 Ecommerce Best Practice Guide #<Author:0x00000010c7d7f0> <p>This new <strong>Ecommerce Best Practice Guide</strong> is designed for ecommerce managers and marketers looking to review their existing ecommerce strategy or to help create ecommerce propositions. Based on the main approaches that support best practice in ecommerce – <strong>upfront analysis, planning and site design</strong> – the report includes practical tips to help maximise results. The report covers the entire customer journey, from when a visitor arrives on the site to when they've completed a purchase.</p> <p>A section on <strong>performance and optimisation</strong> shows marketers how to monitor their campaign performance, and make tweaks to projects in order to meet organisational goals.</p> <p>The report also features a comprehensive guide to ecommerce <strong>platform architecture</strong>, with a look at the hardware and operating systems available so that ecommerce managers can select the right components for their <strong>technology stack</strong>.</p> <p>This guide has been authored by <strong>Steffan Aquarone</strong>, and features insights from a team of industry experts, including:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Paula Abasolo</strong>, Head of Operations and Infrastructure, Dobell</li> <li> <strong>David Kohn</strong>, Customer &amp; Ecommerce Director, Heal's</li> <li> <strong>Isabel Mack</strong>, Chief Product Owner (eCommerce), Iglu.com</li> <li> <strong>Steve Mills</strong>, Director, Green Snow Online Fulfillment</li> </ul> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/240821291" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4622 2017-10-23T12:00:00+01:00 2017-10-23T12:00:00+01:00 B2B Digital Transformation #<Author:0x00000010e9bc08> <p>The<strong> </strong><strong>B2B Digital Transformation: Leading brands share their insights </strong>report aims to explore the challenges B2B companies are facing as they drive forward digital transformation in their own organisations and highlights a number of different approaches these companies are taking.</p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>We carried out a series of in-depth interviews with senior executives from B2B companies and agencies to understand how companies in this sector are responding to different opportunities and challenges.</p> <p>Companies interviewed include: Arkadin Cloud Communications, Work with Agility, Atos, British Gas, Fuji Xeorx, IBM, Ogilvy APAC, OppenheimerFunds, Oracle Marketing Cloud, Salesforce, Slater and Gordon Lawyers and Velocity Partners.</p> <p>We also looked at sector-specific data from our <a title="Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in B2B" href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends-in-b2b">2017 Digital Trends in B2B report</a>.</p> <h2>What you'll learn </h2> <p>Digital transformation is not only redefining how businesses connect with customers, it's redefining business models, the way they deliver value and how they make money. With more and more services being mediated through technology, and an increasing share of revenue being made online, there is little doubt that B2B organisations need to embrace digital transformation and give it strategic importance.</p> <p>You will learn:</p> <ul> <li>How the focus on digital is changing within B2B companies. </li> <li>Making the customer experience matter is a major focus for B2B companies. </li> <li>Driving insights is a priority, with the future of marketing considered to be around data.</li> <li>Driving a cultural change that supports digital transformation is essential.</li> </ul> <h2>You'll discover: </h2> <ul> <li>How digital priorities are rising higher on the agenda as companies encourage a move towards thinking digital first and creating journey-based experiences. </li> <li>How companies are focusing on putting the customer at the heart of everything and identifying how to enhance the experience and develop a deeper understanding of the customer decision journey. </li> <li>The ways in which B2B companies are moving towards a more data-driven approach, focusing on insights to support the buyer journey.</li> <li>The ways in which companies are driving a cultural change that supports digital transformation and a continuous change type of culture.</li> <li>How companies are adopting new ways of working and working towards digital first. </li> <li>A greater push for alignment and collaboration between marketing and sales.</li> <li>Key ingredients to drive success highlighted by those interviewed.</li> </ul> <p>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</p> <p>A <strong>free sample</strong> is available for those who want more detail about the report and its content.</p> <h2>How we can help you</h2> <h2 style="font-weight: normal; color: #3c3c3c;"><a style="color: #2976b2; text-decoration: none;" href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation" target="_self"><img style="font-style: italic; height: auto; float: right;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0004/8296/rgb_dt_logo-blog-third.png" alt="Digital Transformation" width="200" height="66"></a></h2> <p><a title="Digital transformation - Econsultancy" href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">Digital transformation</a> is a journey that's different for every organisation. To enable delivery of your digital vision (or help you shape that vision) we’ve designed a comprehensive approach to tackle your transformation.</p> <p>Covering everything from strategic operational issues to specific marketing functions, we will work with you to achieve digital excellence.</p> <p>Talk to us about an initial, no-cost consultation.</p> <p>Contact our Digital Transformation Team on <a href="mailto:transformation@econsultancy.com">transformation@econsultancy.com</a> or call</p> <ul> <li>EMEA: +44 (0)20 7269 1450</li> <li>APAC: +65 6653 1911</li> <li>Americas: +1 212 971-0630</li> </ul> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2q_lWLm5qtg?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/1217 2017-10-16T15:00:00+01:00 2017-10-16T15:00:00+01:00 Email Marketing Best Practice Guide #<Author:0x00000010efd390> <h2>About this guide</h2> <p>This year’s <strong>Email Marketing Best Practice Guide</strong> sees the original 2014 version rewritten to reflect changes in email marketing over the past 18 months. The strategic sections are organised around ‘pillars’, with new techniques and approaches mentioned throughout. Charts, surveys and case studies have been updated and incorporate the results of <strong>Econsultancy’s <a title="Email Marketing Industry Census 2017" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census" target="_self">Email Marketing Industry Census 2017</a></strong>.</p> <p>Given the ongoing significance of email to most organisations, sections of this guide will be relevant to CEOs and MDs; CMOs and Marketing Directors; FDs and data analysts; brand, content, digital, social, online and ecommerce managers; producers, creatives, and strategists as well as owners in editorial, PR, marketing and customer service departments.</p> <p>This latest version of the guide contains notably more about the technology of email than ever before – including themes such as <strong>Artificial Intelligence and automation</strong> – as well as contributions from expert practitioners throughout. The report also covers the <strong>General Data Protection Regulation</strong>, and how marketers may have to adapt their email marketing strategies to ensure they comply with the new regulation. </p> <p>The report has been created so that marketers can either review their existing email strategy or build a comprehensive email marketing strategy from scratch, by focusing on the following strategic pillars:</p> <ul> <li>Aims and goal setting</li> <li>Segmentation and targeting</li> <li>Communications strategy</li> <li>Copywriting</li> <li>Layout and creative</li> <li>Testing and optimisation</li> </ul> <p>The report also includes a ‘Quick Start’ guide for readers who are looking for short, immediately actionable steps, each set of suggestions tailored to a different level of experience:</p> <ul> <li>Before you start email marketing</li> <li>Intermediate level</li> <li>Refresher tactics for advanced email marketers</li> </ul> <h2>Contributors and reviewers</h2> <p>This report has been updated by <strong>Natalie Rockall</strong> and <strong>Steffan Aquarone</strong>. Natalie is a commercially minded email marketing expert with more than 14 years’ marketing experience. Qualified with the Chartered Institute of Marketing and the Institute of Direct and Digital Marketing, Natalie is also founder of Eleven11 Digital.</p> <p>Steffan leads Econsultancy's Best Practice Report programme. He is a digital entrepreneur and speaker who has trained big brands and spoken around the world on innovation, entrepreneurship and digital marketing.</p> <p>This report builds on a 2014 version, which was authored by <strong>Dave Littlechild</strong>. A founding member of email marketing software provider Adestra, Dave has been at the cutting edge of email marketing for more than a decade.</p> <p>Natalie and Steffan have put together this updated report with the aid of an expert team of contributors who have kindly given their time and effort to producing this guide. Contributors to this report include:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Alice Cornell</strong>, Director of Email Deliverability, Change.org</li> <li> <strong>Catherine Loftus</strong>, Senior Marketing Manager, TrustedHousesitters</li> <li> <strong>Nick Crawford</strong>, Interim Head of eCRM, Travelodge</li> <li> <strong>Rachel Whitter</strong>, Email Channel Manager, RSPB</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4623 2017-10-11T10:00:00+01:00 2017-10-11T10:00:00+01:00 Conversion Rate Optimization Report 2017 <p>This is the ninth annual <strong>Conversion Rate Optimization Report</strong>, in association with <strong><a href="http://www.redeye.com/">RedEye</a></strong>.</p> <p>The research, based on an online survey of more than 800 digital marketers and ecommerce professionals, looks at the types of conversion strategies and tactics organizations are using, in addition to the tools and processes employed for improving conversion rates.</p> <p>As well as touching on the use and impact of personalization, the report explores different areas of best practice and identifies methods and techniques which are most valuable for improving conversion rates.</p> <p>The aim is to provide data and a framework to help companies invest their time and resources as effectively as possible by examining which methods and processes are most likely to yield results.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>Find out the types of conversions and measurements organizations are using and the best practices that shape them.</li> <li>Discover the most valuable methods used to improve conversion rates and the methods organizations will be using in the future.</li> <li>Understand how companies are using personalization as part of their CRO efforts and the effect this has on conversions.</li> <li>Benchmark your organization's approach to CRO using the Conversion Maturity Model, which has been updated for this year's report.</li> <li>The six key factors contributing to CRO success.</li> </ul> <h2><strong>Key findings</strong></h2> <ul> <li>Importance of CRO is widely acknowledged, fueled by a need for continued improvements.</li> <li>Complex testing continues to be the preserve of the few.</li> <li>Personalization challenges are preventing uptake.</li> <li>Responsibility for CRO is shared, requiring a structured approach.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4615 2017-10-06T13:57:00+01:00 2017-10-06T13:57:00+01:00 Trends, Technology and the Impact of Data in Media and Entertainment #<Author:0x00000010ae3188> <p><strong>Trends, Technology and the Impact of Data in Media and Entertainment</strong>, produced in association with <a href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, explores the state of the sector's digital transformation in light of the data revolution, cloud computing and disruptive change in consumer behavior.</p> <p>The report is based on a survey of 285 executives in media and entertainment. It examines <strong>digital trends, technological innovation and the progress of digital transformation</strong> as respondents' organizations attempt to stay abreast of the sector's evolution.</p> <p>Given the necessity to adapt to the digital and mobile shift, respondents have been grouped by their relative states of digital transformation, based on responses to questions on the availability of digital data, analytics resources and technology utilization. Companies at each end of the spectrum, the <em>transformed</em> and the <em>traditional, </em>each make up roughly 20% of the total sample. This distinction is helpful in evaluating where the industry is today and where it's headed.</p> <p>Key trends:</p> <ul> <li>Advertiser need for nuanced performance data</li> <li>Publisher focus on capability, segmentation and addressability</li> <li>Technology and replatforming</li> <li>Consumer trends</li> </ul> <p>While mobile remains chief among consumer trends affecting media and entertainment, competition for consumers' attention from new content and channels has emerged as a significant obstacle in the way of average and traditional companies attempting a digital transformation.</p> <p>You'll also discover:</p> <ul> <li>How do different technology approaches affect the usability and visibility of marketing data?</li> <li>Which KPIs are emerging or receding, and which matter most to forward-leaning companies?</li> <li>What is the disconnect between the priority of replatforming and staffing for the future?</li> <li>What are the top product initiatives for 2017/2018?</li> <li>What are the key drivers of technology replatforming and are companies hitting their marks?</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4579 2017-10-04T13:10:00+01:00 2017-10-04T13:10:00+01:00 The State of Marketing Attribution 2017 <p>Econsultancy's second <strong>State of Marketing Attribution</strong> report, produced in association with <a href="https://www.adroll.com/en-GB/">AdRoll</a>, seeks to establish current adoption levels, confidence in usage and the effectiveness of different attribution methods used by companies.</p> <p>It also focuses on the skills required for success and the barriers to effective use of modelling.</p> <p>The report is based on an online survey of almost <strong>1,000 practitioners from Europe, North America and Asia Pacific</strong>.</p> <p>With comparisons between North America, Europe, Japan and Australia throughout the report, the study builds on last year’s research which was predominantly focused on the European perspective.</p> <h2>Key findings</h2> <ul> <li> <strong>Current usage and confidence in attribution.</strong> There has been an uptick in usage of marketing attribution since last year, reflecting increased recognition about the role this discipline can play in helping companies to achieve their business goals. Despite this increased usage, there is still a lack of confidence in the marketplace surrounding the use of marketing attribution and related technology.</li> <li> <strong>Types of attribution.</strong> Many companies are still using simplistic attribution models which are limiting their ability to make the best possible decisions for their businesses.</li> <li> <strong>Technology used for attribution.</strong> Organisations have become less confident in the ability of their technology to support their attribution-related requirements, despite the increased availability of software in the marketplace.</li> <li> <strong>Attribution challenges.</strong> Companies are more likely to blame technology limitations and disparate data this year, and less likely to blame a lack of time.</li> <li> <strong>Impact of attribution. </strong>Optimisation of the media mix is the number one attribution goal for 2017, overtaking understanding of the customer journey which was the key objective in 2016.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <p>A <strong>free sample</strong> is available for those who want more detail about what is in the report.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4603 2017-09-27T10:00:00+01:00 2017-09-27T10:00:00+01:00 Top 100 Digital Agencies Report 2017 <p>The Top 100 Digital Agencies report is the definitive listing of the UK’s largest digital agencies. The guide features in-depth analysis and commentary on the state of the industry, along with information on each agency to help client-side professionals choose the right partner to help achieve their business goals.</p> <h2><strong>How the Top 100 works</strong></h2> <p>The Top 100 Digital Agencies Report lists the UK’s top 100 digital marketing, design and build, technical and creative agencies. These are ranked on their fee income from digital activities in the UK. For the purposes of the Top 100, fee income from digital activities is defined as the money that agencies retain after any bought-in third-party costs, such as media, production or hosting, have been paid. Although not a perfect metric, we believe that this is a better indicator than overall turnover of what an agency’s digital expertise is worth.</p> <h2>Report features</h2> <ul> <li>Fourteen pages of in-depth editorial content  on the state of the agency industry</li> <li>Ranking tables of the top agencies by fee income, agency type and region</li> <li>The top six most respected agencies and the six most influential people, nominated by the entrants to the Top 100.</li> <li>Profiles of the Top 100 digital agencies, including information such as business split between digital marketing channels, contact details and a list of key clients</li> <li>Seven case studies of agencies demonstrating digital excellence across four distinct categories: strategy, process, people and technology</li> </ul> <p>The Top 100 Digital Agencies report has been published annually since 2002, and historical data is available to subscribers as an Excel download, alongside the full dataset from 2017.</p> <h4><strong>To be added to the mailing list for next year's launch, please send an email to top100@econsultancy.com. You will then receive an invite email and the submission instructions when we open for entries in 2018.</strong></h4> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4604 2017-09-26T14:50:00+01:00 2017-09-26T14:50:00+01:00 Paid Social Media Advertising #<Author:0x00000011639e88> <p>Econsultancy's <strong>Paid Social Media Advertising Best Practice Guide</strong> provides an overview of the major social media channels and the most pressing considerations for marketers looking to generate the most value from social media advertising.</p> <p>The guide provides a <strong>summary of the main self-serve advertising options</strong> on these channels, and outlines some of the premium options available to marketers when <strong>developing a strategic approach to social media marketing</strong> and communications.</p> <p>It has been written to complement Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-platforms-overview">Social Media Platforms Overview</a> and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide">Paid Search Best Practice Guide</a>.</p> <h2>Topics covered</h2> <p>The report covers the following topics:</p> <ul> <li>Paid Social Media Advertising Basics</li> <li>Planning and Strategy for Paid Social Media</li> <li>Ad Creative and Copy Strategy</li> <li>Platform Strategy</li> <li>Managing Paid Social Media Advertising</li> <li>Tools</li> <li>Optimisation</li> <li>Managing Data</li> <li>Additional Challenges</li> <li>Measurement and Evaluation</li> </ul> <h2>Contributing authors</h2> <p>This guide was created by Michelle Goodall, a consultant with more than 18 years' experience offering digital transformation and social media strategy advice to B2B and B2C organisations, both client and agency side. The guide also features input and insights from the following practitioners:</p> <ul> <li>Christie Burnum – VP, Group Manager, Paid Media, Ketchum</li> <li>Debra Forman – President, Ketchum Digital</li> <li>Joanna Halton – Director and Founder, Jo &amp; Co.</li> <li>Andrew Hood – Managing Director, Lynchpin Analytics</li> <li>Paul Kasamias – Head of Performance Media, Starcom|Performics</li> <li>Dave Lowe – Paid Media Manager, Regital</li> <li>Oscar Romero – Head of Performance Media, Spark Foundry</li> <li>Becky Steeden – Social Media Manager, RNLI</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4605 2017-09-26T14:23:00+01:00 2017-09-26T14:23:00+01:00 Social Quarterly: Q3 2017 <p>The <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> is a series of presentations by Econsultancy, which curate the latest trends, developments and statistics in social media. The reports focus on distilling the most recent data and trends, aiming to provide a guide to what's happening now in social media and what you should be keeping an eye on.</p> <p>Social media evolves rapidly, and the <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> provides an overview of the latest trends in the industry. It contains information which can be integrated into your own documents, allowing you to prepare a pitch or use internally at a moment's notice.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly examines the current social media landscape, trends and updates on various social platforms and considers what will happen next. Updated four times per year, it will help to quickly surface statistics and trends you can use and react to immediately.</p> <p><strong>This edition of Social Quarterly includes </strong>Facebook’s introduction of new fundraising tools, including the ‘Donate’ button, LinkedIn’s new ‘Audience Network’, a look at Instagram’s updates to Stories and Facebook’s new ‘Watch’ button, amongst other innovations.</p> <p>Bringing to life data from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> and the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/">Econsultancy blog</a>, the Social Quarterly is the best of social in an easy-to-digest format.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with regular developments across multiple social media platforms.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more and use the linked Econsultancy resources and blog posts to do this.</li> <li>Spot potential ways your company could be using social media but is not currently.</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4597 2017-09-26T13:05:00+01:00 2017-09-26T13:05:00+01:00 The Modern Marketing Model (M3) #<Author:0x00000011a998c0> <p>The increase in new channels and technologies has dramatically changed the environment in which marketers operate. But the way in which marketing is taught, understood and operates has not really changed. This is not sustainable. We need <strong>a new unifying framework as a reference for what marketing has become</strong>.</p> <p>Alongside this need for a framework, there are <strong>new requirements for marketing competencies and capabilities</strong> around domains of expertise like data and analytics, customer experience, content, multichannel and personalisation, which are neither properly understood nor being met. This is acknowledged in the marketing industry but not reflected in any definitive model.</p> <p>Due to these changes and the rise of digital, <strong>the marketing function is going through an existential crisis</strong>: it is not clear on its own remit, does not know what skills it needs or how to organise itself and struggles to resolve a dislocation not only in how it interacts with other business functions but within itself with 'digital' vs 'traditional' schisms.</p> <p>In 2013, we launched the <a title="Introducing the Modern Marketing Manifesto" href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62574-introducing-the-modern-marketing-manifesto">Modern Marketing Manifesto</a> articulating our belief that the marketing discipline should embrace digital and classic marketing.</p> <p><strong>The Modern Marketing Model (M3)</strong> now creates a new framework for applying this thinking within organisations. The Modern Marketing Model is a unifying force which fuses digital and classic marketing into one future-facing framework. This informs marketing’s remit, required competencies and organisational design. <strong>M3 defines marketing in the digital age.</strong></p> <p>This report is free to download for Econsultancy subscribers and registered users.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4584 2017-09-06T21:29:00+01:00 2017-09-06T21:29:00+01:00 International Content: Monetizing Global Content Assets and Measuring Success #<Author:0x00000011acdad0> <p>The <strong>International Content: Monetizing Global Content Assets and Measuring Success </strong>report examines the views of brand-side marketers on the management of international content.</p> <p>This research, conducted by Econsultancy in partnership with <strong>Lionbridge LLC</strong>, is based on a sample of more than 270 executive-level marketers across a variety of international businesses. Respondents' organizations reported an average of $1 - 5 billion in 2016 revenue.</p> <p>The report explores ways in which high-performing organizations govern their international content to improve global brand positioning and increase revenue. The survey contrasts leaders' methods with those of the mainstream to give the reader a better understanding of successful approaches to global content management, and the challenges those taking these approaches encounter.</p> <p>As globalization accelerates, industry leaders tend to centralize control of their global content; <strong>72% of leaders describe their governance of global content as either "very tightly controlled at a global level, with no local autonomy," or "tightly controlled, with some local autonomy."</strong></p> <p>Naturally, localization is a challenge for larger international organizations that tend to have more rigidly defined content strategies than companies in the more ad-hoc mainstream.</p> <p>However, leaders are trying to change this; <strong>twice as many leaders are planning to extend the number of markets in which they have a web presence as their mainstream peers.</strong></p> <p>Standing out among the challenges organizations face in seeking to grow the number of local markets in which they operate are technology, industry compliance, and limited undestanding of ROI within the organization. <strong>Leaders are more than twice as likely as their mainstream peers to report "industry compliance" as the chief obstacle to localized expansion, while the mainstream reports "lack of business case / limited understanding of ROI" at twice the rate of high-performers.</strong></p> <p><strong>Still, everyone struggles with establishing a global governance framework.</strong> While leaders are unsurprisingly better in this regard, <strong>roughly a fifth of both performance groups report it being the main barrier to their organizations' expansion efforts.</strong></p> <p>Findings include:</p> <ul> <li>Nearly two-thirds of leaders (65%) believe that internationalization of content is 'critical for creating a global brand,' compared to only 35% of mainstream respondents. There is broad consensus among leaders that carefully planned international content is integral to digital transformation and the overall customer experience.</li> <li>More than half (54%) of leaders believe their budgeting for international websites is 'very much based on a quantifiable understanding of the likely revenue uplift.' They are similarly likely to report that they have portioned off budget for content internationalization (60%).</li> <li>Leaders are more than four times as likely as the mainstream to have clear ownership of content within their businesses.</li> <li>Among leaders, control of content within the business itself lies with product teams twice as often as it does with the product teams of the mainstream (35% versus 15%, respectively), and with analysts at about the same rate (46% for leaders versus 23% for the mainstream).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4583 2017-09-05T12:42:00+01:00 2017-09-05T12:42:00+01:00 Snapchat: How brands are getting creative on the service <p><em>Snapchat: How brands are getting creative on the service</em> looks at how leading brands are using image sharing and messaging service Snapchat in <strong>creative and pioneering ways</strong>.</p> <p>Launching in 2011, Snapchat now has more than 166m daily active users, and is particularly popular among younger users (Generation Z and millennials). This, along with its <strong>highly visual interface and storytelling tools</strong>, make the mobile-first platform attractive to marketers looking to <strong>engage younger audiences</strong>.</p> <p>This report offers valuable insight into just some of the ways marketers can use Snapchat's features, and should give some indication of the importance of <strong>'mobile moments'</strong> to marketing and engagement in the future.</p> <h2><strong>What you'll learn</strong></h2> <ul> <li>About River Island’s use of location-based in-store filters</li> <li>How the Electoral Commission used the service in an attempt to drive registrations among young voters</li> <li>About Marriott’s foray into creating ‘Snapisodes’</li> <li>How luxury fashion house Burberry has experimented with offering exclusive Snapchat content</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4581 2017-09-05T10:33:00+01:00 2017-09-05T10:33:00+01:00 Adidas: New rules of social engagement <p><em>Adidas: New rules of social engagement</em> is part of a series of brand strategy briefings examining the marketing strategies and tactics of the most popular and searched-for brands. As part of this series, Econsultancy curates a selection of brand case studies and stories to help you improve your modern marketing efforts.</p> <p>Adidas understands the need for existing and new customers to have <strong>meaningful experiences</strong>, whether they are coming to the brand from a fashion perspective or with a more serious interest in health and fitness. To engage these different types of <strong>digitally agile customers</strong>, adidas crafts <strong>social campaigns both across visible platforms and dark networks</strong>, which we consider in this Brand Strategy Briefing.</p> <h2><strong>What you'll learn</strong></h2> <ul> <li>Insight from adidas’ VP of Digital Strategy and Delivery, Joseph Godsey, on how the brand is creating valuable customer experiences via social</li> <li>Adidas’ recent activity using dark social</li> <li>How the brand is combining chatbot technology with Facebook Messenger to engage consumers</li> <li>Specific social media wins from the adidas Originals team</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4578 2017-09-04T17:18:00+01:00 2017-09-04T17:18:00+01:00 Tesco: Lessons in customer centricity <p><em>Tesco: Lessons in customer centricity</em> is part of a series of brand strategy briefings examining the marketing strategies and tactics of the most popular and searched-for brands. As part of this series, Econsultancy curates a selection of brand case studies and stories to help you improve your modern marketing efforts.</p> <p>Tesco is one of the largest retailers in the world, but faces mounting competition from discounters, including Aldi and Lidl. In this briefing, we explore how the supermarket has been putting the customer at the heart of its marketing strategy, an approach that has coincided with six consecutive months of sales growth.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>Tesco's shift towards ‘inside out’ marketing</li> <li>The evolution of the Clubcard loyalty scheme</li> <li>Tesco’s wine-centric approach to experiential marketing</li> <li>The brand’s trial of digital receipts</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4580 2017-09-04T16:44:00+01:00 2017-09-04T16:44:00+01:00 The Fundamentals of Marketing Measurement and Analytics <p>This best practice guide introduces marketers and ecommerce professionals to the <strong>fundamentals of campaign data measurement and analytics</strong>, covering everything from established principles to cutting edge technologies.</p> <p>For many organisations, particularly those with an ecommerce function, customer data is one of the greatest assets to hand, offering incredible insight into an audience's behaviours, wants and needs. How can marketers <strong>access those insights, and transform them into real business outcomes</strong>?</p> <p>This report looks at how digital marketers can capture the data that is available via their interactions with customers, explains how to sort the wheat from the chaff, runs through some of the most important strategies for <strong>extracting lessons from customer data</strong>, and makes suggestions for future proofing your data strategy as technology rapidly evolves.</p> <p>It features insights from <strong>data and analytics experts</strong>, including Tim Eves, who has more than 15 years of analytics experience working with blue chip brands, and Lucy Foster, who leads the Digital Measurement &amp; Performance Tracking programme at Unilever.</p> <p><strong>Acknowledgements</strong></p> <p>We would like to thank the following individuals for their quotes, input and insight contained within this guide.</p> <ul> <li>Tim Eves, Director, Lynchpin</li> <li>Lucy Foster, Global Business Head, Digital Measurement and Performance, Unilever</li> <li>Jamie Robinson, Global Research and Insight Director, We Are Social</li> <li>Kohlben Vodden, Founder, StoryScience</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4570 2017-08-23T12:00:00+01:00 2017-08-23T12:00:00+01:00 How Marketers Learn #<Author:0x00000011cffe48> Steffan Aquarone <p>This report highlights the value of facilitating a learning culture in marketing teams and offers guidance on <strong>developing an organisational learning strategy</strong>.</p> <p>Embracing a culture of learning and development (L&amp;D) is crucial for marketing teams who want to <strong>remain agile and adaptable in an era of exponential change</strong>. But what does a good development strategy look like, and how can marketing teams align their L&amp;D objectives with organisational goals?</p> <p>In this report, Econsultancy presents the <strong>business case for developing an L&amp;D strategy</strong>, and demonstrates how businesses that embed a learning culture will be better able to manage continuous improvement in people, processes and technology and thus remain competitive. It notes that <strong>the</strong> <strong>ability to learn faster than the competition may be a driver in maintaining a competitive advantage</strong>.</p> <p>The report is based on interviews with experts and a survey among more than 200 senior marketers. It also distils the academic and professional literature on the topics of how marketers' learning and development is managed.</p> <h2><strong>Acknowledgements</strong></h2> <ul> <li>Aoife McIlraith, Senior Director of Global Search and Marketing Services, Lionbridge Technologies</li> <li>Ian Jindal, Founder, Internet Retailing</li> <li>Kath Pay, Founder and CEO, Holistic Email Marketing</li> <li>Patrick Mills, Director of Professional Development, Institute of Practitioners in Advertising (IPA)</li> <li>Paul Jocelyn, former Head of Marketing Capability, Tesco</li> <li>Peter Abraham, Co-Founder, weareCrank, Co-Author of Building the Agile Business</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4569 2017-08-21T13:27:00+01:00 2017-08-21T13:27:00+01:00 Nike: Engaging customers across multiple channels <p><em>Nike: Engaging customers across multiple channels</em> is part of a series of brand strategy briefings examining the marketing strategies and tactics of the most popular and searched-for brands. As part of this series, Econsultancy curates a selection of brand case studies and stories to help you improve your modern marketing efforts.</p> <p>Nike has long been one of the most recognisable sportwear brands in the world, but how does it maintain its cachet across the digital channels? In this briefing, Econsultancy looks at Nike's greatest successes over the last 12 months, each carrying a lesson brands and marketers can learn from.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>How Nike turned a product launch into a must-see event, online and offline</li> <li>How Nike approaches its relationship with third-party sellers (i.e. Amazon)</li> <li>How Nike is collaborating with big digital names (i.e. Spotify)</li> <li>How Nike.com stands up as an enjoyable and user-friendly ecommerce experience</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4560 2017-08-15T16:15:00+01:00 2017-08-15T16:15:00+01:00 State of B2B Marketing Automation <p>The <strong>State of B2B Marketing Automation </strong>report, published by Econsultancy in association with <a title="Act-On" href="https://www.act-on.com/">Act-On</a>, is based on a survey of more than 350 B2B marketing professionals.</p> <p>The aim of the research is to explore the maturity of B2B marketing automation, looking at adoption levels and types of strategies organizations are using. The study evaluates tools and processes employed as well as potential barriers to the effective use of the capability.</p> <p>A major focus of this report is the exploration of what B2B companies that are succeeding in their marketing activities are doing differently from the rest.</p> <p>Where appropriate, the research findings are broken down by level of marketing performance, comparing high-performing companies (‘Leaders’) with the rest of the sample (‘Mainstream’), in order to identify the attributes and characteristics that are correlated with success, and to make recommendations.</p> <p><strong>Key findings</strong> from the research include:</p> <ul> <li>Investment in marketing automation drives B2B marketing performance</li> <li>Companies strive to close the gap between expectations and reality</li> <li>Leaders take a different path to ensure they are utilizing tech capabilities</li> <li>Europeans are playing catch-up with their North American counterparts</li> <li>Marketing automation delivers but challenges must be overcome</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <p>A <strong>free sample</strong> is available for those who want more detail about what is in the report.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4566 2017-08-15T11:14:00+01:00 2017-08-15T11:14:00+01:00 Starbucks: Adapting to changing consumer habits <p><em>Starbucks: Adapting to changing consumer habits</em> is part of a series of brand strategy briefings examining the marketing strategies and tactics of the most popular and searched-for brands. As part of this series, Econsultancy curates a selection of brand case studies and stories to help you improve your modern marketing efforts.</p> <p>As one of the most successful and well-known coffee outlets, Starbucks is continuosly learning from and adapting its business and marketing strategy. Other brands and marketers can learn from these stories too.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>How Starbucks is battling the impact of changing consumer behaviour and engaging with new and younger audiences</li> <li>How Starbucks has responded to criticism when adapting loyalty schemes</li> <li>How the brand is utilising new technologies to improve customer experience</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4561 2017-08-08T12:35:00+01:00 2017-08-08T12:35:00+01:00 Account-Based Marketing: A Practical Guide <p>This guide, produced in association with <a title="AdRoll" href="https://www.adroll.com/">AdRoll</a>, is a <strong>deep dive into the practice of account-based marketing</strong> (ABM), showing you how to set up your ABM campaign from start to finish.</p> <p>By working through the eight steps covered in the report, you will <strong>create your own roadmap for implementing ABM in your organization</strong>.</p> <p>Account-based marketing (ABM) is <strong>a structured go-to-market strategy</strong> that involves the coordination of the sales and marketing departments to create personalized, targeted marketing campaigns. </p> <p>Instead of covering a broad range of potential customers, ABM focuses resources on a targeted set of accounts that matter most for the business, thereby increasing the likelihood of converting prospects to sales when compared to using lead-focused models alone.</p> <p>As you’ll see from our <strong>expert quotes</strong>, this can help you cut above the noise in the market and land larger deals. In addition, ABM is not just a function of sales and marketing – it works to its full potential when resources across sales, marketing, finance, customer success and executives are invested in the strategy.</p> <p>As you read through, it’s important to note that ABM isn’t a replacement for your current marketing efforts, but rather an addition to an already successful marketing program. When deployed intelligently, ABM will complement existing programs to close bigger deals more efficiently.</p> <h3>Acknowledgements</h3> <p>We would like to thank the following individuals for their quotes, input and insight contained within this guide.</p> <ul> <li>Adam Leslie, Head of UK Sales &amp; Marketing Solutions, Dun &amp; Bradstreet</li> <li>Andrew Yates, CEO, Artesian Solutions</li> <li>Bob Apollo, Founder and Value Selling Expert, Inflexion Point</li> <li>Caroline Hodson, Managing Director, Woolf Hodson</li> <li>Doug Kessler, Creative Director and Co-founder, Velocity Partners</li> <li>Jason Seeba, VP Marketing, BloomReach</li> <li>Kristen Wendel, Director, Marketing Ops, VersionOne</li> <li>Lindsay Becker, Senior Marketing Programs Manager, LogMeIn</li> <li>Matt Heinz, President, Heinz Marketing</li> <li>Michael Levy, Principal, GZ Consulting</li> <li>Nick de Cent, Editor-in-chief, International Journal of Sales Transformation</li> <li>Tom Gatten, CEO, Growth Intelligence</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <p>A <strong>free sample</strong> is available for those who want more detail about what is in the report.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4554 2017-07-27T14:15:00+01:00 2017-07-27T14:15:00+01:00 Driving Business Growth Series #<Author:0x000000120f20c8> <p>The <strong>Driving Business Growth Series</strong> examines the fundamental shift in power from brand to customer. Based on research conducted in partnership with <a href="https://www.google.com/analytics/360-suite/#?modal_active=none">Google</a>, the briefs explore fundamental questions about what is necessary to thrive in today's marketplace, as well as how marketing organizations are preparing for the future.</p> <p>Primary research included a survey conducted in the first quarter of 2017, with 514 total responses. The online sample was comprised of marketing executives who qualified for the sample based on revenue, sector, geography and seniority. All respondents were at the manager level or higher at organizations with more than $250M in 2016 revenues.</p> <h3><strong>Leaders vs. the Mainstream</strong></h3> <p>To gain a perspective on where marketing is today and where it’s headed, respondents were divided into two groups based on performance. <em>Leading</em> companies significantly exceeded their top 2016 business goal and comprise roughly one-fourth of the sample. The remaining seventy-five percent are designated the <em>mainstream</em> for comparison.</p> <p>Throughout the research, the differences between these groups are significant and educational; leaders are consistently further along in building organizations that are data-driven, focused on larger business goals and committed to customer experience as a path to growth.</p> <p>These companies offer guidance and inspiration for marketers as they work to answer the big questions that will define their future.</p> <h2><em><strong>Measurement and Growth</strong></em></h2> <ul> <li>Leading companies are shifting their focus from short-term goals to long-term customer value.</li> <li>To understand and maximize that value, leaders recognize first-party data as a strategic asset and are investing in its quality and volume.</li> <li>Addressing the whole customer journey is reflected in how leaders structure the marketing organization and budgets. They are more likely to have end-to-end teams, merge their online and offline media planning and to feel that marketing should own all customer experiences.</li> <li>The need for faster decision making is driving the use of proxies for hard to establish metrics. This is part of a larger effort to connect marketing investments with business outcomes.</li> <li>Leading brands are experimental. They go beyond optimization to exploring strategic questions and the challenges and opportunities of emerging trends. Today, central areas of inquiry are omnichannel experience and mobile journey optimization.</li> </ul> <h2><em>An Audience of Individuals</em></h2> <ul> <li>The extraordinary shift of power from brand to consumer is driving new priorities in personalization and its ability to affect the customer journey.</li> <li>The industry has reached a consensus that there is a direct connection between brands’ financial growth and the ability to anticipate and assist customers along their journey.</li> <li>Leading marketing organizations differentiate themselves with an emphasis on investment in the capabilities and technologies necessary to understand and act on customer data. Specifically, leaders are focused on first-party data and automation.</li> <li>Leaders see machine learning as essential to increasing the efficacy of personalization.</li> <li>Technology opens the door to higher margins based on relationship marketing that emphasizes value, treats the best customers accordingly and encourages retention.</li> </ul> <h2><em><strong>Local and the Customer Journey</strong></em></h2> <ul> <li>Virtually all organizations have come to believe that their customer experience must reflect the entire customer journey. The capability to understanding the individual’s needs and provide assistance wherever, whenever and however they require it is seen as critical to growth.</li> <li>Team structures at leading companies are being designed to solve for the end-to-end journey across devices and channels.</li> <li>Leading companies have moved to merged media budgets, reflecting the blended experience of consumers and the remit of omnichannel marketing.</li> <li>Executive leadership is catching up with the modern customer. Leading organizations say that their C-suite is following the right KPIs to understand the impact of mobile and digital.</li> <li>Leading marketers are actively working to extend their capability to understand and affect the varied customer journey. Roughly half are currently investing in experiments that test omnichannel experiences and technologies that connect digital with offline.  </li> </ul> <h2><em><strong>Leading in Mobile Customer Experience</strong></em></h2> <ul> <li>Today’s most successful marketing organizations have done a better job of internalizing the reality and implications of a customer experience-led model.</li> <li>Leaders are moving away from channel-centric teams, instead designing them to address the whole of the customer journey.</li> <li>The mobile customer experience is at the center of strategy and investment for leading companies.</li> <li>Other areas of investment that differentiate leaders include first-party data, strategic experimentation and anything that helps make customer experience faster/easier.</li> <li>Proving return on investment remains the main barrier to investment in personalizing experience, but those companies who have already made the leap overwhelmingly agree that it has boosted profitability.</li> </ul> <p> <strong><em>The</em> <em>Driving Business Growth Series</em>, as well as all of Econsultancy's research and best practice content, is available via <a href="https://econsultancy.com/subscribe/#subscribe-now">subscription</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4552 2017-07-25T14:32:00+01:00 2017-07-25T14:32:00+01:00 Trend Briefing: Artificial Intelligence (AI) #<Author:0x00000012077e40> <h2>Overview</h2> <p>Trend Briefing: Artificial Intelligence (AI) equips marketers with knowledge of perhaps one of the most prominent and exciting areas of tech innovation in 2017 – Artificial Intelligence.</p> <p>The guide was written by film and technology entrepreneur Steffan Aquarone, who has consulted and trained for big brands and spoken around the world on innovation, entrepreneurship and digital marketing, and features insights from senior marketers and innovators.</p> <p>It explains how and why AI has become such a talked about topic in recent years, suggests how marketers might benefit from its immediate practical applications and predicts what the technology might make possible in the near future.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4551 2017-07-24T11:31:00+01:00 2017-07-24T11:31:00+01:00 Content Strategy Best Practice Guide #<Author:0x000000120c57d0> <h2>Overview</h2> <p>The aim of this research was to identify best practice approaches, techniques, challenges and opportunities around digital content strategy.</p> <h2>Research methodology</h2> <p>The methodology involved two main phases:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Phase 1:</strong> Desk research to identify relevant issues, examples and models.</li> <li> <strong>Phase 2:</strong> a series of in-depth interviews with a range of senior digital and non-digital marketing practitioners, Heads of Content, UX and Content Strategists. Interviewees for the research covered sectors as diverse as financial services, media, public sector, NGO and FMCG.</li> </ul> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <p>This best practice guide:</p> <ul> <li>outlines some key definitions</li> <li>sets out a core process for content strategy in the digital age</li> <li>defines some key strategic models that enable the smart application of content in the service of achieving marketing objectives.</li> </ul> <p>Included in this report are the following:</p> <p><strong>The content strategy process</strong></p> <p>We define the importance of tying back to a solid strategic process that is aligned to answering the fundamental questions of strategy:</p> <ul> <li>Where are we now?</li> <li>Where do we want to get to?</li> <li>How do we get there?</li> <li>How do we know when we’ve got there?</li> </ul> <p>Our research has demonstrated this alignment to be critical to effective content strategy implementation.</p> <p><strong>Insight and persona generation</strong></p> <p>We discuss the key thinking and methodologies around successful persona generation, how brands are using personas to inform strategy and how relating content to a solid understanding of the customer journey through customer journey mapping can establish a firm foundation for success.</p> <p><strong>Aligning content with brand strategy</strong></p> <p>Defining a content marketing mission, and a key model for relating content to brand purpose and essence.</p> <p><strong>Distribution and format</strong></p> <p>We set out a key model for building an effective content ecosystem (borrowed from YouTube) – ‘Hero, Hub, Help’, look at an example brand that shows exemplary practice in this context, and consider the best ways of linking format selection with objective.</p> <p><strong>Optimisation culture</strong></p> <p>The practitioners interviewed for this report stressed the importance of developing a testing culture to ensure continuous, not just episodic, test and learn. When combined with a structured content calendar, this can bring both alignment and optimisation of resources and impact.</p> <p><strong>Content and technology</strong></p> <p>The marketing and content technology landscape is more complex than ever so how might practitioners best navigate through this complexity and make smart decisions about technology? Technology will play an ever-increasing role in the content marketing process and ecosystem, so how can marketers set themselves up for success?</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4535 2017-07-20T09:35:00+01:00 2017-07-20T09:35:00+01:00 2017 Measurement and Analytics Report <p>Never have marketers, analysts and ecommerce professionals had more data to work with as part of their ongoing efforts to improve business and organisational performance.</p> <p>At the same time, the growing challenge for individuals and organisations alike has been to avoid being overwhelmed by proliferating sources of data and metrics across a burgeoning number of marketing channels and technology platforms.</p> <p>The <strong>2017 </strong><strong>Measurement and Analytics Report</strong>, produced by Econsultancy in partnership with analytics consultancy <strong><a href="http://www.lynchpin.com/">Lynchpin</a></strong> for the tenth year running, looks at how organisations are using data strategically and tactically to generate insights and to improve business performance.</p> <p>The report aims to cut through the noise to understand how companies are using measurement and analytics to boost revenue and profit growth, while also looking at the types of technology and data which are used to meet these ends.</p> <p>The research, based on a survey of almost 1,000 digital professionals, focuses on the important role for data and analytics in supporting their attempts to build a competitive advantage by becoming more customer-centric. The report also explores how the worlds of data science and digital analytics are converging as companies strive to extract valuable insights from a wealth of information relating to digital activity in the context of the wider business.</p> <h2>What you'll learn from this research</h2> <ul> <li>Understand how analytics can help to meet financial goals and what the most common growth and profit-related requirements are.</li> <li>Discover how organisations are using data and analytics to build a competitive advantage by becoming more customer-centric.</li> <li>Benchmark the make-up of your analytics or data team and investment plans against those of your peers.</li> <li>Find out where the biggest analytics skills gaps are and what the most common challenges related to deploying tools and technologies organisations face.</li> </ul> <h2>Key findings from the report</h2> <ul> <li>The majority of companies (64%) do not have a documented data analytics strategy.</li> <li>Only 50% of organisations report executive sponsorship of analytics.</li> <li>Half of organisations surveyed regard digital analytics as ‘very important’ to their digital transformation programme (a jump from 43% in 2016).</li> </ul> <h2>Contributors</h2> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank the following people for their contributions to this report:</p> <ul> <li>Amiy Chatley, Digital Analytics Manager, TUI</li> <li>Matteo Fava, Global Head of Analytics, Delivery Hero</li> <li>Graeme McDermott, Chief Data Officer, Addison Lee</li> <li>Andrew Morris, ‎Head of Digital Insight Delivery, RS Components</li> <li>Alejandro Pereda, Head of Insight, Euromoney Institutional Investor plc</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4507 2017-07-20T08:45:00+01:00 2017-07-20T08:45:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in IT <p>The <strong>2017 Digital Trends in IT </strong>report, based on the seventh annual trends survey conducted by Econsultancy and <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, explores the digitally-driven opportunities and challenges facing organisations from the perspective of IT professionals.</p> <p>IT is now seen as an increasingly strategic function within the business, and pivotal to organisational attempts to embrace digital transformation and customer experience initiatives. It is no longer sufficient for the IT department to act merely in a support role when it comes to delivering against the company’s overarching business objectives. IT leaders need to take ownership and drive change within the modern, digitally-enabled organisation.</p> <p>The research is based on data from more than 500 IT leaders (manager level or above) who were among more than 14,000 digital professionals taking part in the seventh annual Digital Trends survey, carried out in November and December 2016.</p> <h3>The following sections are featured in the report:</h3> <ul style="font-weight: normal;"> <li>What keeps IT leaders up at night?</li> <li>2017 priorities for success</li> <li>Challenges of digital transformation</li> <li>Actionable tips to help future-proof your IT function</li> </ul> <h3>Findings include:</h3> <ul> <li>There is heightened pressure on IT practitioners to stay abreast of customer trends, and to deliver infrastructures that enable the real-time and personalised services users increasingly expect in the digital age. <strong>Keeping up with changing customer expectations and behaviour</strong> was cited as a key challenge by 40% of respondents, a greater proportion than those worried about keeping IT systems up and running.</li> <li> <strong>The threat of security breaches and cyber-risk threats</strong> is cited as a key concern by a higher proportion of respondents (41%) than any other area, and security of business and customer data is the most commonly cited IT leader priority for 2017.</li> <li>Larger organisations are less confident than their smaller counterparts when it comes to the <strong>adequacy of digital skills and talent</strong> within their business. With the rise of digital transformation, data scientists are at a premium, and few organisations have all the resources they need to make use of new analytics tools and capabilities.</li> <li>The impact of digital technology on workflows within organisations has been vast, affecting every business function from HR to finance, and marketing to procurement. Nearly half (49%) of IT executives indicate they have prioritised <strong>enhancement of digital workflows</strong>, for example via cloud-based tools, for 2017.</li> <li> <strong>Keeping ahead of major technology connected to innovation</strong> is another key challenge for IT leaders. Executives at large companies are notably more inclined to feel pressure regarding tracking technology and innovation trends than smaller company peers (46% versus 36%).</li> </ul> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><strong>Econsultancy's Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing">here</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4493 2017-07-19T22:10:00+01:00 2017-07-19T22:10:00+01:00 Partners in Transformation: What brand marketers need from agencies #<Author:0x000000125022d0> <p>The <strong>Partners in Transformation: What brand marketers need from agencies </strong>report explores the views of senior, brand-side executives on the changing relationship between brands and agencies.</p> <p>This research, conducted by Econsultancy in partnership with <a href="https://www.ibm.com/watson/marketing/">IBM Watson Customer Engagement</a>, is based on a sample of over 300 senior-level, brand-side executives over a range of customer-facing businesses at organizations reporting an average of $1 billion dollars in 2016 revenues.</p> <p>The report examines pain points and successful aspects of brand/agency relationships as they exist today, covering topics from employing agency assistance in customer experience management, to agencies' evolving role in data analytics and technology investment.</p> <p>Though the relationship is changing, high-performing brands are <strong>taking advantage of new opportunities being created by the pressures</strong> both brands and agencies face from intensifying market competition.</p> <p>Automation and commoditization have cut significantly into the profits from media buying and production. This has hurt agencies, but <strong>high-performing brands are finding new ways to collect help in data analysis, customer experience management and strategy</strong>.</p> <p><strong>The ability of agencies to expand brands' data-related capabilities is no longer a priority among high performers</strong>; instead, leading brands expect adapted agencies to be able to assist with utilizing the technology brands already have (30% of leaders report this area of expertise as providing the most value, versus only 19% of the mainstream).</p> <p>The most successful brand/agency relationships occur when brands don't need to rely fully on agencies for outside perspective, <strong>with high-performing brands valuing their agencies for sharing CX expertise at nearly twice the rate as the mainstream (31% of HPCs versus 16% of the mainstream)</strong>. Nearly a third (30%) of the mainstream, by contrast, rely heavily on their agencies to provide a wider industry perspective, compared to only 10% of industry leaders.</p> <p>Findings include:</p> <ul> <li>High-performing brands are 50% more likely than the mainstream to see evolved agencies providing the most value in pushing creative thinking, and assisting with technology utilization. High performing companies rank <em>help in technology utilization </em>as a top criterion when evaluating agency value because they have invested heavily in technology and want to extract its full potential.</li> <li>High-performing brands are 63% more likely to be using their agency partners in areas related to customer experience than the mainstream.</li> <li>Successful brands are three times more likely to say that their agencies collaborate very effectively.</li> <li>Leading brands see the collaboration between their internal teams and agencies in a similarly positive light; high performers are more than 1.5 times as likely to say that internal-team/agency collaboration is "quite effective."</li> <li>Most high performers see positive changes in their agency relationships, but that's not true for the mainstream, where only 20% say they're seeing more productivity</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4538 2017-07-17T01:00:00+01:00 2017-07-17T01:00:00+01:00 State of Marketing Automation in Australia and New Zealand <p>The 'holy grail' of marketing automation envisaged by marketers sees the complete elimination of internal data silos to build a 360-degree view of the customer, and the utilisation of this intelligence to enable deeper, personalised engagement with prospects and clients.</p> <p>But how close are today’s marketers to realising this?</p> <p>This is Econsultancy’s first <strong>State of Marketing Automation in Australia and New Zealand</strong> report, published in association with <a title="Oracle Marketing Cloud" href="https://www.oracle.com/marketingcloud/about/australia-new-zealand.html">Oracle Marketing Cloud</a>.</p> <p>The research is based on a survey of over 350 marketing professionals based in Australia and New Zealand, and evaluates current adoption levels, tools and processes employed as well as barriers to effective use of marketing automation.</p> <p>Key insights from the research include:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>The majority of companies are choosing to manage their marketing automation in-house.</strong> Three in five (59%) organisations have an in-house team managing marketing automation activities, with only a fifth outsourcing them to an agency. Large organisations (with annual revenues of more than $50 million) are more likely to outsource their marketing automation.</li> <li> <strong>Budgets and internal buy-in are there, but a capability gap is hampering the potential of marketing automation.</strong> Encouragingly, a lack of budget and organisational buy-in prevents only a minority of organisations (20% and 12% respectively) from implementing their automation strategy. The most common barriers are related to data integration and inadequate resources.</li> <li> <strong>There’s a pressing need for data unification.</strong> Only a quarter of companies are working towards the creation of a unified database. Furthermore, nearly half of companies say that integrating data is the most significant barrier to effectively implementing a marketing automation strategy.</li> <li> <strong>Cloud-based SaaS platforms lead the way at an enterprise level.</strong> Large organisations (with annual revenues of at least $50 million) are more likely to use cloud-based SaaS platforms that include automation (38% vs. 28% of smaller organisations).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <p>A <strong>free sample</strong> is available for those who want more detail about what is in the report.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4533 2017-07-04T11:00:00+01:00 2017-07-04T11:00:00+01:00 Achieving Predictive Maturity <p>The <strong>Achieving Predictive Maturity</strong> report, published in association with <a title="RedEye" href="https://www.redeye.com/">RedEye</a>, follows on from a survey of 400 marketers carried out for the <a title="Predictive Analytics Report" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/predictive-analytics-report/">2016 Predictive Analytics Report</a> and aims to examine how companies move from a limited state where they are 'starting out' through to a 'strategic' state where predictive capabilities lie at the heart of the business.</p> <p>It is based on a series of interviews with senior practitioners along with insights from other primary Econsultancy research.</p> <h3>Key themes</h3> <p>The following themes are featured in the report:</p> <ul> <li>Having the right data remains the critical first step</li> <li>Data quality is an ongoing hygiene factor</li> <li>Automation and machine learning pave the path to the highest levels of predictive maturity</li> <li>Business goals need to remain front of mind</li> </ul> <h3>Contributors</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank the following people for their contributions to this report:</p> <ul> <li>Nathan Ansell, Global Director of Loyalty, Customer Insight and Analytics, Marks &amp; Spencer</li> <li>James Backhouse, Marketing Director, Evans Cycles</li> <li>Richard Clark, Marketing Director, N Brown Group plc</li> <li>Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce, Lovehoney</li> <li>Lara Izlan, Director of Programmatic Trading, Auto Trader</li> <li>Simon Kaffel, Head of Data Transformation – EMEA, HSBC Retail</li> <li>Katrina King, Head of Customer Marketing, Direct Line Group</li> <li>Colin Lewis, CMO, OpenJaw Technologies (former marketing director, BMI)</li> <li>Peter Markey, Marketing Director, TSB</li> <li>Clement Mazen, Senior Growth Manager, HomeAway</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4531 2017-06-30T14:00:00+01:00 2017-06-30T14:00:00+01:00 Building a Digital Culture <p><strong>Building a Digital Culture</strong> is a best practice guide providing you with tips and information on how to embed a digital culture in order to compete in a fast-paced, digitised and customer-centric world.</p> <p>We draw on a range of survey data, case studies and interviews with leading industry figures to explore what it means to have a digital culture and how executives can go about getting the rest of the company on board.</p> <h3>What you'll learn</h3> <ul> <li>How serving customer experience is a catalyst for organisational change</li> <li>How a digital culture takes shape </li> <li>Who's who in a digital culture </li> <li>Culture as a foundation for growth and innovation</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4512 2017-06-27T14:30:00+01:00 2017-06-27T14:30:00+01:00 The Customer Experience is Written in Data #<Author:0x00000012aee2e8> <p><strong>The Customer Experience is Written in Data</strong> explores the growing role of data and analytics in marketing. With analytics capabilities falling behind the data available to marketers, organizations are dividing between those that recognize the importance of data analysis, and those that do not. This report, produced in association with <a href="https://www.google.com/analytics/360-suite/#?modal_active=none">Google</a>, is based on a survey of more than 700 executives at organizations with revenues of more than $250 million in 2016.</p> <p>To gain a perspective on where marketing is today and where it’s headed, respondents have been divided into two groups based on performance.  <em>Leading</em> companies significantly exceeded their top 2016 business goal and comprise roughly one-fourth of the sample. The remaining seventy-five percent are designated the <em>mainstream</em> for comparison.</p> <p>Mainstream organizations tend to struggle with drawing actionable insights from data. Industry leaders are almost three times as likely to say that they take action based on recommendations from analytics than their mainstream peers.</p> <p>Standing out as a point of difference between leaders and laggards is an understanding of the customer journey across channels; while an astonishing 90% of all marketers believe that understanding the cross-channel experience is "critical to marketing success," only 43% of the mainstream report having a "clear understanding of customers' journeys across channels and devices," compared to 64% of leaders.</p> <p>Key areas covered in the report include:</p> <p><strong>1. Risk aversion</strong></p> <p>Leaders are significantly less risk-averse than their mainstream peers.</p> <p>In their marketing today, leaders are 65% more likely to report that "as a marketing organization, we are comfortable with risk." Similarly, they are 70% more likely to say that as a business, "we are a quite open to change."</p> <p><strong>2. Free and open internal access to data and analytics drives marketing success</strong></p> <p>Providing free access to data insights goes hand in hand with risk friendliness - an organization may not know where its non-marketing departments may go with the analytics, but there's only upside in sharing.</p> <p>Managers and executives interviewed for the report agree that marketing is too siloed. Insights and even basic marketing performance data are often not made sufficiently available.</p> <p>Survey data supports the idea that open access to data and analytical insights across an organization is critical to success. Leaders are 57% more likely to strongly agree that open access to data leads to higher business performance, and are significantly farther along in providing access to analytics internally.</p> <p><strong>3. Successful organizations don't treat data strategies as manuals - they incorporate them into the culture</strong></p> <p>But that's not to say leaders don't also document their data and analytics strategies in a structured manner. They are 35% more likely to have a documented data and analytics strategy, and 28% more likely to believe that strategy principles are useful for decision making at all levels.</p> <p>The report examines 12 dimensions of digital analytics and data strategy, comparing adoption and performance.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4470 2017-06-21T16:00:00+01:00 2017-06-21T16:00:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in Healthcare and Pharma <p>The <strong>2017 Digital Trends in Healthcare and Pharma </strong>report reveals a sector that has just started to embark on its digital transformation journey, but with a huge potential for disruption through emerging digital technologies.</p> <p>After a slow start due to the complexities of a siloed sector with legacy infrastructure, alongside heavy regulation and risks associated with patient data and care, healthcare and pharma companies are likely to see exponential change over the next few years as digital data storage and sharing becomes the norm.</p> <p>The research, conducted by Econsultancy in partnership with <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, is based on a sample of almost 500 respondents working in the healthcare and pharma sector who were among more than 14,000 digital professionals taking part in the seventh annual Digital Trends survey, carried out in November and December 2016.</p> <h3>The following sections are featured in the report:</h3> <ul> <li>A sector ripe for digital disruption</li> <li>Shifting control results in a focus on the customer</li> <li>The future looks more promising than ever</li> <li>Actionable tips to help future-proof your healthcare/pharma business</li> </ul> <h3>Findings include:</h3> <ul> <li>The healthcare and pharma sector lags behind others in terms of digital maturity. Strict regulations and a lack of universal standards mean that new entrants find it harder to establish themselves, and levels of risk associated with human health are greater, which can limit innovation. Only 6% of companies describe themselves as digital-first, compared to an average of 11% across other sectors.</li> <li>Healthcare and pharma companies are 14% more likely than their peers in other sectors to consider customer journey management as a top-three tactical priority in 2017, with larger organisations even more likely to prioritise multichannel campaigns and journeys, and also to join up online and offline data.</li> <li>The boom in wearables that collect lifestyle and fitness data is of huge benefit to an industry whose wealth of existing data is often locked up by regulation or in non-digitised formats. Two-thirds of healthcare and pharma companies see improving data analysis capabilities as ‘very important’ for the coming year, reflecting the need for skilled staff to collect, distil and analyse this data influx.</li> <li>Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are being incorporated into new healthcare technologies and systems, with uses ranging from training doctors in operating techniques to gamifying patient treatment plans. Over a quarter (26%) of respondents see the potential in VR and AR as the most exciting prospect for 2020.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Econsultancy's Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing">here</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4509 2017-06-13T11:16:00+01:00 2017-06-13T11:16:00+01:00 Travel - Digital Trends and Developments <p><strong>Travel - Digital Trends and Developments</strong> presentation by Econsultancy distills the most recent third-party data and trends, providing a guide to what's happening now in the sector and what you should be keeping an eye on. This presentation will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with digital developments.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more - and use the linked resources to do this.</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4502 2017-06-08T11:00:00+01:00 2017-06-08T11:00:00+01:00 Digital Transformation in the Financial Services and Insurance Sector #<Author:0x00000012fea0f8> <p>The<strong> Digital Transformation in the FSI Sector: Gearing up for success in a changing market</strong> report builds on our <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/digital-transformation-in-the-financial-services-sector-2016">previous report</a> looking at digital transformation in the sector. The report aims to explore the approaches new entrants are taking and their focus on the customer experience and marketers' responses to challenges, as well as providing recommendations on approaches to and opportunities related to digital transformation.</p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>We carried out a series of in-depth interviews with senior executives from across the financial services and insurance industries to understand how a range of organisations were responding to different opportunities and challenges.</p> <p>Companies interviewed included: The AA, Atom Bank, Aviva, AXA PPP Healthcare, Bought By Many, Lloyds Banking Group, Monzo, National Australia Bank, OCBC Bank, HSBC Singapore, Salesforce and UBS Wealth Management, APAC.</p> <p>We also looked at sector-specific data from our <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/2017-digital-trends-in-financial-services-and-insurance">2017 Digital Trends in Financial Services and Insurance sector</a>.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <p>The financial services industry has seen more disruption in the last few years and continues to face significant challenges as new players are seizing the opportunity to enter these markets and new models emerge.</p> <ul> <li>Customer experience continues to be a major focus for marketers and new entrants are focusing on differentiating the customer experience and making the financial lives of customers easy.</li> <li>Having the right strategy and culture to deliver digital transformation is seen as essential with strong leadership from the top.</li> <li>Data is perceived as being a huge part of the digital transformation journey.</li> </ul> <h2>You'll discover findings around:</h2> <ul> <li>How companies are looking to differentiate the customer experience and deliver value to their customers.</li> <li>Ways in which companies are re-orientating their focus around customers and moving away from being product-focused to putting the customer first and delivering products and services more aligned to their needs.</li> <li>The importance of earning trust in the sector and delivering more transparent services to customers.</li> <li>Practices companies are adopting to work in a more agile way. </li> <li>Encouraging a digital culture where digital is not a bolt on. </li> <li>Unlocking the value of data to understand customer journeys and behaviour to deliver more personalised and relevant communications.</li> <li>Importance of innovation starting with the customer and how companies are collaborating and partnering to drive change. </li> </ul> <p>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</p> <p>A <strong>free sample</strong> is available for those who want more detail about what is in the report.</p> <h2>How we can help you</h2> <h2 style="font-weight: normal; color: #3c3c3c;"><a style="color: #2976b2; text-decoration: none;" href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation" target="_self"><img style="font-style: italic; height: auto; float: right;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0004/8296/rgb_dt_logo-blog-third.png" alt="Digital Transformation" width="200" height="66"></a></h2> <p><a title="Digital transformation - Econsultancy" href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">Digital transformation</a> is a journey that's different for every organisation. To enable delivery of your digital vision (or help you shape that vision) we’ve designed a comprehensive approach to tackle your transformation.</p> <p>Covering everything from strategic operational issues, down to specific marketing functions, we will work with you to achieve digital excellence.</p> <p>Talk to us about an initial, no-cost consultation.</p> <p>Contact our Digital Transformation Team on <a href="mailto:transformation@econsultancy.com">transformation@econsultancy.com</a> or call</p> <ul> <li>EMEA: +44 (0)20 7269 1450</li> <li>APAC: +65 6653 1911</li> <li>Americas: +1 212 971-0630</li> </ul> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2q_lWLm5qtg?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4503 2017-06-02T10:29:00+01:00 2017-06-02T10:29:00+01:00 Retail - Digital Trends and Developments <p><strong>The Retail - Digital Trends and Developments</strong> presentation by Econsultancy distills the most recent third-party data and trends, providing a guide to what's happening now in the sector and what you should be keeping an eye on. This presentation will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with digital developments.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more - and use the linked resources to do this.</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4501 2017-06-01T10:36:00+01:00 2017-06-01T10:36:00+01:00 Financial Services and Insurance - Digital Trends and Developments <p><strong>The Financial Services and Insurance - Digital Trends and Developments</strong> presentation by Econsultancy distills the most recent third-party data and trends, providing a guide to what's happening now in the sector and what you should be keeping an eye on. This presentation will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with digital developments.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more - and use the linked resources to do this.</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4471 2017-05-31T11:00:00+01:00 2017-05-31T11:00:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in Media and Entertainment <p>The <strong>2017 Digital Trends in Media and Entertainment </strong>report is a barometer of the extent to which companies in this sector are embracing digital technology, focusing their strategies and prioritising resources for the year ahead and beyond.</p> <p>The research, conducted by Econsultancy in partnership with <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, is based on a sample of more than 550 media and entertainment industry respondents who were among more than 14,000 digital professionals taking part in the seventh annual Digital Trends survey, carried out in November and December 2016.</p> <h3>The following sections are featured in the report:</h3> <ul> <li>The four traits of successful digital media and entertainment companies</li> <li>Content + data = personalised experiences</li> <li>Gearing up for the future</li> <li>Actionable tips to help future-proof your media/entertainment business</li> </ul> <h3>Findings include:</h3> <ul> <li>The proportion of media and entertainment companies describing themselves as digital-first (22%) is more than double the average percentage for all other sectors (10%), and second only to the gaming &amp; gambling sector (25%). At the other end of the scale, only 15% of media respondents say that digital marketing is ‘very much separate’.</li> <li>‘Creating compelling content for digital experiences’ stands out as the single most exciting opportunity in 2017, selected by 22% of media organisations. Great content in isolation is not always enough. There is a growing need for media companies to create compelling experiences around their content, and to present it in the right context.</li> <li>Digital-first organisations are 17% more likely to invest in design to help differentiate their brand than laggards. Furthermore, digital leaders are 19% more likely to have the ‘processes and collaborative workflows they need to achieve a design advantage’ (75% vs. 63%). Digital leaders are also 23% more likely than laggards to say they have ‘well-designed user journeys that facilitate clear communication and a seamless transaction’.</li> <li>The relentless use of data is a feature of progressive media companies seeking to provide experiences that are as personalised and relevant as possible. Data-driven marketing is a key strategic priority for three in five (62%) media organisations, second only to customer experience (84%) in importance.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Econsultancy's Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing">here</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4504 2017-05-31T10:00:00+01:00 2017-05-31T10:00:00+01:00 Travel Internet Statistics Compendium <p>Econsultancy's <strong>Travel Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a comprehensive collection of the most recent travel sector statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media.</p> <p>Like our main <a title="Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium">Internet Statistics Compendium</a>, this report has been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the travel internet statistics you need.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p>Report topics include:</p> <ul> <li>Global and regional digital marketing trends in travel</li> <li>Statistics on hotels and accommodation booking behaviour</li> <li>Top travel agencies and travel websites</li> <li>The digital travel advertising market</li> <li>Market data on digital channels and customer experience trends in travel</li> <li>The use of Virtual Reality/Artificial Intelligence for travel</li> </ul> <p><strong>A free sample document is available for download</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4055 2017-05-30T17:00:00+01:00 2017-05-30T17:00:00+01:00 Paid Search Best Practice Guide <p>Now including new sections on topics such as <strong>paid search in social media, video advertising, mobile paid search, Shopping campaigns and ad extensions</strong>, Econsultancy's refreshed and updated <strong>Paid Search Best Practice Guide</strong> covers everything you need to know about paid search advertising.</p> <p>The guide will help beginners and experts to plan, create, launch and optimise paid search campaigns and maximise their return on investment.</p> <p>Built on the foundations of our previous report, this document has been created and updated using insight, tips, strategies and tactics from those working every day in the paid search field and generating profits for their clients.</p> <p>This guide contains actionable, real-world insight with detailed explanations to help you start and improve your performance within paid search.</p> <h2>Topics covered</h2> <p>Sections covered include:</p> <ul> <li>Paid Search Basics</li> <li>Planning and Strategy for Paid Search</li> <li>Setting up Paid Search</li> <li>Paid Search Optimisation</li> <li>Mobile Paid Search</li> <li>Google Shopping: Shopping Campaigns and Product Listing Ads</li> <li>International and Multilingual Paid Search</li> <li>Marketing Campaign Integration Strategy</li> <li>Video Advertising</li> <li>Paid Search in Social Media</li> </ul> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jcMukdgGWMU?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h2>Contributing authors</h2> <p>This guide has been put together and updated by <strong>Rob Jones, an experienced digital consultant and owner of Romor Digital</strong>, with the assistance of leading agencies and practitioners working at the coal face of paid search. They have kindly contributed their time and effort in producing this guide.</p> <p>They include:</p> <ul> <li>Neil Hancock, Head of Optimisation and Planning, Silverbean</li> <li>Kevin Joyner, Director of Planning &amp; Insight, Croud</li> <li>Paul Kasamias, Head of Performance Media, Starcom/Performics</li> <li>Sophie Kleiner, Head of Search, NMPi</li> <li>Judith Lewis, Founder, Decabbit Consultancy</li> <li>Tom Lewis, Head of Professional Services, DC Storm </li> <li>Hannah Zora Mattinson, Senior Paid Marketing Manager, Silverbean</li> <li>David McDiarmid, Head of Paid Search, DigitasLBi</li> <li>Oscar Romero, Head of Performance Media, Mediavest/Performics</li> <li>Sam Vandermark, Associate Director - Digital, The Specialist Works</li> <li>Matt Whelan, Digital Strategy Director, The Specialist Works</li> <li>Peter Whitmarsh, Head of Paid Media, Search Laboratory</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4482 2017-05-30T12:00:00+01:00 2017-05-30T12:00:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in South Africa <p>The <strong>2017 Digital Trends in South Africa</strong> report highlights the key digital trends, challenges and opportunities which South African marketers need to be aware of during 2017, covering topics ranging from customer experience and social media marketing to mobile and artificial intelligence.</p> <p>The research, conducted by Econsultancy in partnership with <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, is based on data from almost 250 South Africa-based respondents who were among more than 14,000 digital professionals taking part in the seventh annual Digital Trends survey, carried out in November and December 2016.</p> <h3>The following sections are featured in the report:</h3> <ul> <li>Striving for digital maturity as nation catches smartphone bug</li> <li>Social media and brand building are top priorities</li> <li>Future of the customer experience</li> <li>Fit for the future: three key areas South African marketers should focus on</li> </ul> <h3>Findings include:</h3> <ul> <li> <strong>Companies strive for integrated approach to digital marketing activities. </strong>Around a third of in-company respondents say their businesses are either digital-first (17%), or that digital permeates all their marketing activities (15%). Asked about their clients, agency respondents are significantly more likely than their client-side counterparts to say that digital marketing is very much separate (30%), and correspondingly less likely to say their clients are digital-first (only 1%).</li> <li> <strong>Agencies are more focused than their client-side peers on how mobile is changing the business landscape</strong> as South Africa transitions from being a feature phone nation to a smartphone nation. More than three-quarters (77%) of supply-side respondents report that understanding how mobile users research/buy products is ‘very important’, 17 percentage points higher than for company respondents (60%).</li> <li> <strong>Customer experience and cross-channel marketing are major areas of strategic focus.</strong> Almost nine in ten (89%) South African companies say that CX is one of their top-three strategic areas of priority for 2017, including 58% who make it their first choice. They are 54% more likely than their international counterparts to rank cross-channel marketing as their first choice (20% versus 13% for the rest of the world).</li> <li> <strong>Companies are embracing the burgeoning marketing opportunity afforded by social platforms</strong>, with social media engagement and brand building / viral marketing sharing first place in terms of tactical priorities for businesses in South Africa. More than a third of respondents (37%) say these tactics are among their top three priorities.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Econsultancy's Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing">here</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4496 2017-05-26T10:12:00+01:00 2017-05-26T10:12:00+01:00 Webinar: The Future of HR in the Digital Age <h2>About the webinar</h2> <p>Hosted by Neil Perkin, the webinar covered findings from our <a title="The Future of HR in the Digital Age" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-future-of-hr-in-the-digital-age/">latest research</a>:</p> <ul> <li>The new context for HR - digital disruption and the customer experience revolution</li> <li>HR and digital leadership - how is leadership and leadership development changing in the digital-empowered world?</li> <li>HR and digital transformation - how can HR empower digital-native culture and transformation?</li> <li>Changing HR practice - shifting performance management processes, building high-performance teams, developing a learning culture, approaches to talent acquisition and management</li> </ul> <h2> Watch the webinar recording</h2> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/218916188" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h2>Digital Transformation Event: Talent and Culture</h2> <p>Econsultancy is also hosting an event which will focus on similar topics on June 14 at The Mandarin Oriental, London: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/digital-transformation-conference-talent-and-culture/" target="_self">Digital Transformation: The two key pillars of change, talent and culture</a>. This event is aimed at C-suite and senior-level, client-side marketing, digital and HR professionals.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/digital-transformation-conference-talent-and-culture/" target="_self">Find out more and request your place</a></p> <h2>HR in the Digital Age Training</h2> <p>We're also happy to announce that Neil Perkin is going to be hosting a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/hr-in-the-digital-age" target="_self">one-day training course</a>, focusing on the need-to-know shifts and the latest thinking and approaches, in order to help you and your company succeed in the digital age. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/hr-in-the-digital-age">The course</a> is ideal for anyone working directly in HR, Learning and Development, or involved in leading teams and transformation.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/hr-in-the-digital-age" target="_self">Find our more and book your place</a></p> <h2>Get in touch</h2> <p>If you have any questions about the event or the webinar please contact <a href="mailto:alice.brown@econsultancy.com">alice.brown@econsultancy.com</a>.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4455 2017-05-26T10:12:00+01:00 2017-05-26T10:12:00+01:00 The Future of HR in the Digital Age #<Author:0x0000000e41ae98> <h2>About this report </h2> <p>The critical part that the Human Resources and Learning and Development (HR and L&amp;D) functions play in digital transformation has always been clear.</p> <p>As digital impacts ever more broadly across sectors and corporate divisions, both areas have over time become only more essential to the transformation of business functions to become truly ‘fit-for-purpose’ for a digital-empowered world.</p> <p>While HR and L&amp;D professionals have always been part of the Econsultancy community we have not (until now) focused specifically on how the functions themselves are changing in response to challenges and opportunities brought by digital. A number of our previous Digital Transformation reports have touched on this area, most notably the <em><a title="Digital Marketing: Organisational Structures and Resourcing Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-marketing-organisational-structures-and-resourcing-best-practice-guide/" target="_self">Digital Marketing: Organisational Structures and Resourcing Best Practice Guide</a> </em>and our<a title="Skills of the Modern Marketer Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/skills-of-the-modern-marketer/" target="_self"><em> Skills of the Modern Marketer Guide</em></a>, but this is an opportunity to consider how the practice of HR is shifting.</p> <p>This research drew both from our existing knowledge and data, derived from multiple studies and reports, and from a series of in-depth interviews conducted with HR professionals across a broad range of sectors incorporating an equally broad set of challenges.</p> <h2>Key findings</h2> <ul> <li> <strong>Redefining human resources (HR) </strong>– an increasingly greater role for technology and particularly data has the potential to radically shift HR practice and processes. This brings new challenges in the need for HR professionals to improve digital literacy and skills in order to maximise the possibilities created by new technologies and adapt to the rapidly shifting organisational context that surrounds them.</li> <li> <strong>Customer experience (CX) and digital transformation </strong>are both acting as key drivers for shifting HR practice as many organisations reorient resourcing, focus and culture around customer-centric strategies. As businesses transform to become ‘fit-for-purpose’ for a rapidly changing digital world, the HR function is playing a critical role in supporting change through a heightened focus on culture, learning and employee engagement.</li> <li> <strong>Talent –</strong> shifting organisational priorities are creating high demand for talent in particular fields and creating challenges for HR to recruit scarce but high-demand talent. As a result, recruitment processes and relationships are being reinvented.</li> <li> <strong>Performance management </strong>– rapidly changing contexts are impacting performance management processes, as organisations seek to be more adaptive and rely on more regular, informal feedback rather than rigid annual performance reviews and ratings.</li> <li> <strong>Empowerment – </strong>as businesses seek to move faster, employee and team autonomy and empowerment have taken on a new level of importance. The HR function is playing a key role in encouraging employee ownership and empowerment.</li> <li> <strong>Leadership and culture – </strong>our research shows that in the context of the increasingly agile, digitally-empowered operating environment, the qualities that define great leadership are changing. HR and learning professionals are refocusing leadership development programmes on enhancing not only traditional leadership skills, but ‘softer’ skills that can enable greater collaboration, entrepreneurialism and the ability for the business to move fast. A key part of this is focusing not only on knowledge, but on the behaviours that can establish organisational norms and support the right culture for agility.</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4472 2017-05-24T15:00:00+01:00 2017-05-24T15:00:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in the Technology Sector <p>The <strong>2017 Digital Trends in the Technology Sector </strong>report demonstrates that organisations within the sector that is transforming many others are leaders in digital integration, but are having to transform their internal structures and strategies to adapt to changing customer demands and behaviours, putting the customer first rather than the product.</p> <p>The research, conducted by Econsultancy in partnership with <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, is based on a sample of over 900 respondents working in the technology sector who were among more than 14,000 digital professionals taking part in the seventh annual Digital Trends survey, carried out in November and December 2016.</p> <h3>The following sections are featured in the report:</h3> <ul> <li>Technology organisations lead in digital maturity</li> <li>The customer takes centre stage</li> <li>The next wave of tech innovation</li> <li>Actionable tips to help future-proof your technology business</li> </ul> <h3>Findings include:</h3> <ul> <li>Organisations in the technology sector are nearly twice as likely as their peers in other sectors to classify themselves as digital-first (19% vs. 10%), putting the sector in third place (after gaming &amp; gambling and media) out of the 15 key sectors we analysed.</li> <li>Tech organisations appear to be prepared for the challenge presented by a rapidly changing industry; across the eight key factors identified for digital success, technology organisations are ahead of other sectors. UX design is one of the areas they excel in, as they’re 23% more likely to say they have ‘well-designed user journeys that facilitate clear communication and a seamless transaction’.</li> <li>The vast majority (81%) of technology companies are putting the customer at the heart of all their initiatives, and customer journey management is the second most important priority for 2017, closely followed by targeting and personalisation.</li> <li>Almost a third (29%) of tech companies are planning to use product/service innovation to differentiate themselves from competitors over the next year. Digital-first organisations reveal their maturity as they are 52% more likely than the rest to see customer experience as a key differentiator, second behind product/service innovation.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Econsultancy's Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing">here</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4489 2017-05-22T11:14:00+01:00 2017-05-22T11:14:00+01:00 Social Quarterly: Q2 2017 <p>The <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> is a series of presentations by Econsultancy, which curate the latest trends, developments and statistics in social media. The reports focus on distilling the most recent data and trends, aiming to provide a guide to what's happening now in social media and what you should be keeping an eye on.</p> <p>Social media evolves rapidly, and the <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> provides an overview of the latest trends in the industry. It contains information which can be translated into your own documents, allowing you to prepare a pitch or use internally at a moment's notice.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly examines the current social media landscape, trends and updates on various social platforms and considers what will happen next. Updated four times per year, it will help to quickly surface statistics and trends you can use and react to immediately.</p> <p><strong>This edition of Social Quarterly includes</strong> Facebook’s introduction of ‘Stories’, the introduction of ‘Cabana’ from Tumblr, additional AR filters on Instagram and new ‘Trending Stories’ from LinkedIn, amongst other innovations.</p> <p>Bringing to life data from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> and the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/">Econsultancy blog</a>, the Social Quarterly is the best of social in an easy-to-digest format.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with regular developments across multiple social media platforms.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more and use the linked Econsultancy resources and blog posts to do this.</li> <li>Spot potential ways your company could be using social media but is not currently.</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4490 2017-05-22T11:10:00+01:00 2017-05-22T11:10:00+01:00 Innovation Best Practice Guide #<Author:0x0000000ef09610> <p>The <strong>Innovation Best Practice Guide</strong> is Econsultancy's most wide-reaching report on the topic of innovation.</p> <p>The report details tried and tested approaches to innovation that are designed to be practical tools to help you think differently and create new things.</p> <p>It challenges notions about startups, offers advice on embedding an innovative culture within organisations and explains that innovation is as much to do with reframing a message or your marketing as coming up with new products.</p> <h2>About the author</h2> <p>This report was written by <strong>Steffan Aquarone</strong>. Steffan is a UK entreprenuer in the film and technology sectors, has founded multiple startups and leads Econsultancy's best practice guides programme as well as delivering training to clients around the world.</p> <h2>Contributors</h2> <p>This guide has been put together and updated with the assistance of leading innovation professionals. They have kindly contributed their time and effort in producing this guide.</p> <p>Contributors to the report include:</p> <ul> <li>Mike Baxter, Goal Atlas</li> <li>David Sharp, 10x at Ocado</li> <li>Clint Hook, Experian</li> <li>James Donkin, Ocado</li> <li>Eric Weaver, XEROX</li> <li>Sarah Churchman, PwC</li> <li>Peter Robbins, GSK</li> <li>Paul Coby, John Lewis Partnership</li> <li>David Heinemeier Hansson, Basecamp</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4485 2017-05-17T18:48:00+01:00 2017-05-17T18:48:00+01:00 The New Face of Luxury: Maintaining exclusivity in the world of social influence <p>For some time, the mass market appeal of social media seemed to be in contradiction to the privacy and exclusivity of the luxury industry, creating understandable caution among luxury brands. But with the influx of digital media platforms and the rise of social influencers, luxury brands have had to embrace (and brave) the new world of social influence.</p> <p><strong>The New face of Luxury</strong>, a report produced in association with <a title="Fashion and Beauty Monitor" href="http://www.fashionmonitor.com/">Fashion and Beauty Monitor</a>, offers valuable insight on how the luxury industry can collaborate successfully with influencers.</p> <p>The report outlines interesting trends to watch including rising budgets, increasing video content, commitment to resources, the rise of micro-influencers and experimental formats.</p> <h2>Key findings</h2> <ul> <li>73% of luxury brands are active within influencer marketing yet only half of luxury respondents admit that their influencer marketing programme is only a year or less than a year old.</li> <li>65% of respondents say that their approach to influencer marketing is effective and content collaborations are proving effective for 73% of luxury brands.</li> <li>73% say that maintaining exclusivity and aspiration on social media is their biggest challenge.</li> <li>Budget is proving to be the biggest factor holding luxury brands back from running an effective influencer marketing strategy.</li> </ul> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>An online survey was fielded in February and March 2017 and a highly targeted base of 322 professionals working across the fashion, beauty and luxury sectors took part. In addition, telephone interviews were carried out in March and April 2017 among senior-level marketers and global luxury fashion and beauty influencers and brands.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4480 2017-05-10T11:08:00+01:00 2017-05-10T11:08:00+01:00 2017 State of Digital Transformation in Financial Services #<Author:0x0000000f5a5d98> <p>The <strong>2017 State of Digital Transformation in Financial Services </strong>report, produced by Econsultancy in partnership with <a href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html" target="_blank">Adobe</a>, explores how digital is changing the competitive landscape across financial services sectors, with a focus on retail banking, investment and insurance.</p> <p>The report, which is based on a survey of more than 400 marketers, discusses the challenges and opportunities that the digital shift presents to marketers in this sector.</p> <h2>Key focus</h2> <p>When disruption happens in the financial services industry, it can reshape organizations to their core. With the explosion of new technologies like AI or platforms like mobile, businesses in financial services are expected to incorporate convenience and ubiquity into the experience they offer. This is easier said than done. In this report, we see that more than 40% of FSI businesses worry about appealing to their new generation of consumers.</p> <p>What's the cause of this concern? Customer expectations that have risen as technology has enabled consistent and convenient experiences. In most sectors, consumers can get what they want, when they want it, with little friction. That sets the bar for FSI and much of the industry is struggling to keep up.</p> <p>Ten years ago, mobile phones were merely telephones on the go. Today, mobile devices, sites and apps are people's connection to everything. A multichannel customer experience is the new normal.</p> <p>That gets to the root of what this report examines – who are the digital leaders and how do they differ from the mainstream? How do these differences manifest across retail banking compared to insurance and investment businesses? Most importantly, what can leaders in any kind of FSI company learn to help their transformation programs?</p> <p><strong>The following topics are explored in the report:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Outlook on the future of digital in FSI</li> <li>The budgetary future</li> <li>The differing effects of AI on the subsectors of financial services, investment and insurance</li> <li>Focus on banking innovation</li> <li>Digital activation and support of agents/brokers</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4468 2017-05-08T11:20:00+01:00 2017-05-08T11:20:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in B2B <p>The <strong>2017 Digital Trends in B2B</strong> report demonstrates the priorities and progress being made in B2B marketing as digital experiences in the consumer world continue to bleed into B2B journeys. The results show a sector that, though marred by the familiar 'B2B lags behind B2C' adage, is showing maturity in terms of prioritisation of digital strategy.</p> <p>A lack of capabilities in key areas holds back progress, but there’s increasing evidence that customer experience and digital transformation have taken on a more prominent role.</p> <p>The research, conducted by Econsultancy in partnership with <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, is based on a sample of almost 2,400 B2B respondents who were among more than 14,000 digital professionals taking part in the seventh annual Digital Trends survey, carried out in November and December 2016.</p> <h3>The following sections are featured in the report:</h3> <ul> <li>Fostering a digital culture</li> <li>Lack of confidence in mobile continues</li> <li>The next wave of B2B marketing</li> <li>The CX of the future</li> <li>Actionable tips to help future-proof your B2B business</li> </ul> <h3>Findings include:</h3> <ul> <li>B2B marketers are just as likely to state that their company is digital-first as their B2C counterparts. However, progress at the other end of the scale appears to be stagnating; the proportion of those with digital marketing activities ‘very much separate’ to the rest of their marketing has increased this year to more than a fifth of respondents.</li> <li>B2B’s lag behind B2C is most evident in mobile capabilities. B2B companies are 29% less likely than their B2C counterparts to rank mobile as a top-three strategic priority in 2017, and only 12% are making mobile optimisation a tactical priority, with mobile marketing investment also low.</li> <li>Data is a key strength and priority of B2B; almost three-quarters of organisations have made it a strategic priority, and this is reflected in their confidence over handling data. Compared to last year, they are less likely to say that data is difficult to master, and slightly more likely to use online data to optimise the offline experience and vice versa.</li> <li>The continued dominance of CX in terms of the focus of marketers is reflected in the report, with 91% of B2B brands making the discipline a strategic priority in 2017. However, they are less likely than B2C companies to use CX as their key differentiator, with product innovation and quality almost as likely to be used.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Econsultancy's Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing">here</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4148 2017-05-02T12:45:00+01:00 2017-05-02T12:45:00+01:00 Social Media Platforms Overview #<Author:0x0000000feefea8> <p>Part of our <a title="Social Media Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Best Practice Guide bundle</a>,<strong> we've updated and refreshed this report for 2017</strong> to reflect on the latest trends and to provide <strong>a snapshot of the major social media platforms and the most pressing considerations for marketers looking to generate the most value from social media</strong>, as well as what to consider when making the business case for social media platforms.</p> <p>From Snapchat Lenses and Geofilters and authentic content such as Live Video to the opportunities of augemented reality and chatbots in social media, we've got the latest trends covered in this 2017 edition of Econsultancy's social platforms overview. </p> <p>The report provides a summary of the main features of social media platforms, and outlines some of the options available to marketers when developing a paid, owned and earned strategic approach to social media marketing and communications.</p> <p>Throughout the report, we bring you <strong>examples of how companies are using social media in different ways, as well as insights from companies interviewed</strong> specifically for this guide.</p> <p>For more details on <strong>best practice approaches, techniques, challenges and opportunities for creating your social media strategy</strong>, read the complementary <strong><a title="Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a></strong>.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_IhT9S2YEyY?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>The methodology involved two main phases:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Phase 1:</strong> Desk research to identify relevant issues, examples and models.</li> <li> <strong>Phase 2:</strong> A series of in-depth interviews (20 interviews in total) with a range of senior digital and non-digital marketers, communications leads and social media strategists. Interviewees for the research covered sectors as diverse as aerospace, retail, hospitality, public sector (including government), SaaS, FMCG, non-profit, agency, financial services and media.</li> </ul> <h2>Lead author</h2> <p>The lead author for our social media best practice guides is <strong>Michelle Goodall</strong>, an experienced consultant. She has more than 17 years’ B2C and B2B experience client and agency-side, providing digital transformation and social media strategy advice and support.</p> <p>She has worked with a wide range of clients, including London2012, BBC, Direct Line Group, Multiple Sclerosis Society, Barclays Bank, Coca Cola, Unilever, US Embassy, and many others.</p> <p>Michelle is a trainer and consultant for Econsultancy and can generally be found curating things that smart people write / make / do and getting to grips with Peach and other peripheral / transformative / game-changing technologies for her clients.</p> <h2>Contributors</h2> <p>The author and Econsultancy wish to extend sincere thanks to the following respected professionals who have contributed to the report:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Vikki Chowney</strong> – Director of Content &amp; Publishing Strategies, H+K Strategies</li> <li> <strong>Marisol Grandon</strong> – Head of Creative Content, The Department for International Development (DFID)</li> <li> <strong>Will McInnes</strong> – Chief Marketing Officer, Brandwatch</li> <li> <strong>Kerry Taylor</strong> – Senior Vice President Director of Television, MTV Networks</li> <li> <strong>Tom Barker</strong> – Head of Digital, National Trust</li> <li> <strong>Rachel Miller</strong> – CEO, IC Crowd</li> <li> <strong>Stephen Waddington</strong> – Partner and Chief Engagement Officer, Ketchum</li> </ul>