ad networks

Three things that show the scale of the ad fraud challenge

Ad fraud is a topic that cannot be ignored.

At Econsultancy conferences, any discussion of programmatic media comes with the obligatory debate about building transparency into an ecosystem where the advertiser so often lacks control.

I thought I’d write a short post simply stating the scale of the problem with three facts.

Facebook Atlas: what you need to know

Here’s a brief introduction to Atlas by Facebook, the social network’s new ad network of sorts.

Facebook was already selling ads in other apps via its Audience Network, which has been in beta since April 2014.

This Audience Network allows advertisers to promote their apps in other apps using banner, interstitial or native units and all the targeting data Facebook can stump up.

But now, with Atlas, Facebook is extending this to websites, too. All that Facebook data will be used to sell ads outside of the network and these will be seen by Facebook users. The idea is that this data will increase the effectiveness of ads by allowing greater tracking of users. 

Future versions of Firefox to block third-party ad cookies

Online advertising continues to grow by leaps and bounds, but that doesn’t mean that life is easy for players in the digital ad ecosystem. In fact, the thriving online ad economy is increasingly complicated.

Unfortunately, things are only going to get more complicated. Need evidence? Look no further than last week’s announcement that one of the most popular browser makers, Mozilla, will begin blocking cookies from third-party ad networks by default in Firefox 22.