Amazon

Amazon’s new FC Ambassadors program is bad social media strategy

Amazon might be the master of ecommerce and, increasingly, just about everything else. But following the discovery that the company is employing workers to defend it on social media, it is clear that Amazon has yet to master the art of reputation management on social media.

The past several years have been especially prosperous for Amazon, and 2018 has seen the company’s fortunes – as well as that of its founder and CEO, Jeff Bezos – rise to new heights.

Campbell’s is launching a new product online exclusively for the first time ever

Campbell Soup Company, colloquially referred to as Campbell’s, has achieved a notable first in its nearly 150 year history: it launched a new product exclusively through online retail channels.

V8+Hydrate, which won’t be available in-store until November, aims to quench consumer thirst with a low-calorie, vegan-friendly, non-GMO and gluten-free hydration beverage. It incorporates the storied V8 brand name, which has been a staple in Campbell’s lineup since 1948, and given this, it would appear that Campbell’s first-ever ecommerce-first product launch is associated with a product it has high hopes for.

Amazon is courting advertisers with video ads, external links

After years of speculation and predictions about Amazon’s ability to become a digital advertising powerhouse, it’s happening.

The online retail giant now has annual ad sales exceeding $2bn, and advertising is its fastest-growing segment. With over half of consumers starting their product searches on Amazon, there’s every reason to believe that Amazon’s ad revenue will continue to grow.

Five ways ecommerce is being revolutionized right now

Ecommerce has come a long way from its birth in the 1990s. From the dot-com boom and bust, to the SEO age, the rise of social media, and the impact of mobile, this industry has had a wild ride.

That ride is far from over. We are in the midst of still more changes. We cover five of them here.

The four pillars of a successful Amazon strategy

Amazon has 310 million global users, and is predicted to have accounted for a third of all online UK spend in 2017. 

Unsurprisingly, statistics like this present a tempting opportunity for ecommerce retailers, with many choosing to operate across third-party marketplaces like Amazon as well as brand sites, and in some cases, even forgoing their own.

Amazon stumbled on Prime Day, but its competitors failed to pounce

On Monday, Amazon held its fourth annual Prime Day, its summer answer to the infamous Black Friday and Cyber Monday shopping holidays held every November.

On Prime Day, Amazon rewards Prime members – of which there are now more than 100m – with deals galore, including deals on items sold by Whole Foods, which Amazon acquired last year for nearly $14bn.

Amazon turns to print to capitalize on the demise of Toys R Us

The demise of Toys R Us has created a multi-billion dollar opportunity for retailers, and many are already jockeying for position in the toy retail market.

Not surprisingly, one of the retailers looking to pounce is Amazon. But Amazon apparently isn’t assuming that its dominant position in online retail will automatically translate to toy sales when the holidays come around and there are no more Toys R Us kids.

How product-led digital advertising is evolving

Last year for the first time data for the US indicated that ad spend on digital surpassed that on TV. 

There are many reasons for this (such as the rise of mobile, powerful digital ad formats such as video etc.). But undoubtedly one of the attractions is digital’s ability to deliver measurable performance-based product-led advertising – designed to generate online sales and conversions. This has contributed to brands (ranging from consumer packaged goods to fashion brands) spending a growing proportion of budget on product-led digital ads instead of devoting greater amounts to generating brand awareness via TV and bill boards.