barack obama

Elections then and now: How Obama’s influence has changed between 2008 and 2012

In the week preceding the US election I wrote a couple pieces on the importance social media will play on the election and how much Mitt Romney and Barack Obama spent on online advertising.

A new infographic from Cognitive Match takes a look at the numbers in a different way. In the aftermath of the election, they have taken a step back and have compared the shift in social media and voter patterns in swing states between the 2008 election and the 2012 and how the spend on online ads have increased.

Are your Twitter followers fake, or just quiet?

Twitter’s battle with spammers is well-documented, and not surprisingly, one of the tools that makes Twitter spam possible is the fake account.

While the exact number of fake accounts is hard to accurately estimate, there’s little doubt they exist, and most likely in big numbers.

Do Not Track gains support, but will it really work?

Today, the administration of US President Barack Obama announced a blueprint for a “Privacy Bill of Rights.”

The goal: “improve consumers’ privacy protections” and “give users more control over how their personal information is used on the Internet”, all the while maintaining the internet’s status as an “engine for innovation and economic growth.”

To achieve that goal, the president has enlisted the help of some of the internet’s biggest names, including Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL.

SOPA blackouts to go on, even if bill is dead (for now)

Parts of the internet will go black tomorrow. From Wikipedia and Reddit to the Cheezburger network and Major League Gaming, numerous highly-trafficked web properties say they’ll shut down to protest the SOPA legislation that would make the internet far less free in the name of fighting piracy.

Even Google is going to be making a statement using its homepage.

The blackouts are going on despite the fact that SOPA is effectively dead — for the time being.

Is Barack Obama losing his social media touch?

When it comes to the use of social media for political campaigning, the President of the United States, Barack Obama, provided the case study in the 2008 election. Using services like Facebook and Twitter to rally and organize his supporters, he was able to run a grassroots campaign that hadn’t really been seen before.

After he was sworn in, it looked like social media would continue to play a role in his administration but, for obvious reasons, the President significantly turned down his personal use of social channels. Recently he’s been trying to turn it on again, but will he be successful this time around? His recent social media usage hints that the President may have a more challenging time using social media to his benefit in 2012.