behavioral advertising

IAB & NAI propose tech specs for consumer disclosure on behavioral

The message from Washington to the online ad industry has been ringing loud and clear: regulate yourselves before we have to do it for you. Taking another step in that direction, industry groups the IAB and the NAI released the CLEAR (Control Links for Education and Advertising Responsibly) Ad Notice Technical Specifications, a set of common technical standards that would enable enhanced notice in online ads. These specifications would allow advertisers and ad networks to provide a clickable icon in or near online ads directing users to additional information about behavioral advertising, including an opt-out option.

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Social and mobile to drive search growth – SEMPO

sempo logoVideo and mobile search, as well as marketers’ increased willingness to pay a premium for behavioral targeting and mobile search, are going to propel the search industry forward, according to the 2008 State of the Market survey of advertisers and agencies by the Search Engine Marketing Professional Organization (SEMPO).

Seventy-five percent of the 890 search engine advertisers and SEM agencies SEMPO polled say they’d pay more for clicks behaviorally targeted to in-market consumers. On average, advertisers say they’d pay 10 percent more for dayparted and demographic segmenting, and 13 percent more for behavioral search targeting.

Google bows behavioral targeting as a two-way street

behavioral two way streetThey’re calling it “interest-based targeting” rather than behavioral, but Google’s finally allowing advertisers to target users based on what they’ve been surfing on the Web. With a twist. The company is handing over both tools and power to consumers who can find out why they’re being served the ads they see, and also opt-out of the targeting by segment (if not entirely).

The program’s still in beta (and beta at Google can last a long, long time). But once publishers get on board, consumers will have the option of viewing the categories they’ve been placed in: expectant mother, say, or travel. While they have the option of opting out of the program entirely, they can also opt out on a bucket-by-bucket basis, which may provide incentive for them to stick with the overall program.

Major ads groups unite for good behavior

It’s not easy to get multiple large trade orgainzations on the same page, and to speak with the same voice, but that’s exactly what the major US trade orgs are doing in the face of potential federal regulations governing behavioral advertising practices.

The American Association of Advertising Agencies (4As),  the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), the Direct Marketing Association (DMA), and the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) have banded together (along with the Better Business Bureau) “to develop a cohesive and far-reaching self-regulatory effort for interactive advertising.”

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