books

Eight novels digital marketers will enjoy

There’s no accounting for taste, but I often think it a bit of an anomaly that many of the world’s incisive businessmen and women spend their spare time with their heads in books that look like they came from the self improvement aisle of an airport book shop.

I’m sure you know the business books I’m talking about – they have grandly ambiguous titles and include hyper-extended metaphors.

Perhaps these books are more useful than my blog posts, but I’d like to recommend some alternatives all the same.

Paperback vs. ebook: the staging ground for a generational battle

The recent Hachette and Amazon standoff got me thinking again about the e-reader. 

Of all the transformations of physical media to digital, I can’t think of one that has rumbled on and divided audiences like the paperback to ebook. 

Arguably not CD to MP3, maybe because people could still burn CDs from iTunes (the move to subscription music was more gradual) whereas people can’t print their ebooks on a whim. 

Arguably calls to SMS to messaging apps, DVDs to streaming, physical games to computer games, these were easy transitions.

Can bookshops like Foyles benefit from digital in-store?

The legendary Foyles bookshop on Charing Cross Road in London recently shuffled along the street once more and re-opened with a bang.

It’s an amazing store with clean lines and ordered stock, a world away from images of a rather cluttered 1930s Foyles such as this one.

I headed in to check out the in-store experience and to assess whether bookshops can benefit from digital in-store (leaving the e-book argument in the long grass).

Chiefly, I tested Foyles’ free wi-fi, which features an inventory search and mapping tool.

Harper Collins: from publisher to creative content business

Harper Collins and its business development team are a great example of how publishers are adapting to the business of content, not simply bound sheaves of pulped wood.

In an indicator of how service-based the UK economy has become, Harper Collins now sums up its business as following:

“We create bespoke content based on products and campaigns for our clients.”

“We work with content, not just books, across print, digital, mobile and more.”

“Our editorial expertise, content and creativity enable clients to communicate brand identity and values.”

One of the areas of the publishing house where this is most evident is Harper Collins Children’s Books. I decided to find out more about its business model.