caching

How to optimise your images for SEO

Images are increasingly important to the customer experience and search yet many sites are not optimised to take advantage.

In the early days of the web images were typically small and of low quality. We all remember the little animated men at work icons that littered the web in its infancy.

However, as users have moved from dial-up to broadband connections, the number, size and quality of images on the web has increased significantly. 

20 things that could be slowing your website down

Your website could be a visually-stunning conversion machine, but its appearance and functionality won’t matter much if it takes too long to load. That’s because web users are increasingly impatient and their impatience is likely to continue to grow as tablet and mobile web usage skyrockets.

Unfortunately, the list of things that can cause users to flee a website is long, and in many instances, any one of them can be enough to turn a new customer into a lost opportunity.

Amazon adds a caching offering to AWS

When it comes to building high-performing web applications, there are plenty of tools that developers can employ to improve efficiency and reduce unnecessary resource utilization.

Caching is typically one of those tools, and in the market for caching solutions, the open-source Memcached is, for many developers, sort of like a trusty old hammer.

Originally developed for use on LiveJournal, Memcached is still used by some of the internet’s largest sites, including Facebook.

Load time: coming soon as a Google ranking factor?

Google’s algorithm looks at a significant number of ranking factors when it decides where a site should be in the SERPs. These ranking factors, and the weight they’re each given, change over time.

Last week at PubCon, Google’s Matt Cutts revealed a new ranking factor that may debut in 2010: page load time.

Why do major publishers prevent Google from caching?

A website I run is undergoing a makeover and is down for the day, and I wanted to show somebody the old version. As such I aimed for the Google cache, which is useful in this sort of situation.

I noticed that the cache had updated in the early hours of the morning, and as such I couldn’t see our old site. Bugger.

It seems that Google is caching news sites with increasing frequency. Yet some newspaper websites don’t like Google caching at all…