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How can brands take greater advantage of second-screen usage?

A recent BBC World News survey of more than 3,600 digital device owners found that 43% of tablet users say they consume more TV than they did five years ago, with most respondents saying they use tablets alongside TV.

A recent Deloitte survey found that 24% are using a second screen while watching TV. This crossover with leisure time presents a unique opportunity to convert those in a ‘lean-back’ position. 

So how can marketers respond to this trend? 

What will TV look like in 2031?

The year is 2031. Flying cars have just hit the open market, the New York Mets are on the verge of winning their first World Series in forty-five years, and television as we know it has ceased to exist.  

Let’s first imagine that a super smart group of MIT engineers solved all the technical troubles we’d encounter in switching from a broadcast to a unicast model.

The public’s consumption habits now overwhelmingly favor an on-demand format, and each household is equipped with a SmarTV capable of streaming content instantaneously from anywhere on the web.

Traditional channels have fallen in the face of more agile competition from platforms like Netflix and Hulu, or they’ve adapted to HBO Go-esque versions of their former selves.

Monetise this: the connected experience

Connected second screen experiences have enjoyed, or arguably suffered, a prolonged period of experimentation. No single slam dunk business model has disrupted the landscape, but there are several approaches that have succeeded in generating additional revenues and enhancing the 30-second TV spot. 

Since they are not ubiquitous, you may not be aware of these successes. Here I examine the barriers and opportunities for the connected experience in detail.

This blog elaborates on the latter, with some examples of great connected experiences that have been successfully monetised.