celebrities

Is Twitter getting too noisy for high-profile users?

Celebrities and athletes often turn to Twitter to interact with their fans, but for one of the National Basketball Association’s biggest stars the popular platform became too noisy.

As his following grew into the millions, Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors started using Twitter less and less, something his former university roommate, Bryant Barr, noticed.

Five celebrity social search takeaways for your content strategy

I spent the best part of the last three years focused on assisting editorial teams in driving traffic through celebrity searches.

It was fast paced, breaking, and quite often absurd. It is also possibly the most transient search vertical of them all, with the fickle nature of celebrity appeal rising and falling in rapid media driven spikes.

In such a rapidly changing and often odd market, you need to be prepared, so here are five celebrity search takeaways that can translate to real life. 

Microsoft, Oprah and the celebrity myth

Looking for a tablet this holiday shopping season? If you are, and you’re leaning towards a shiny new iPad, wait just a minute: Oprah wants you to know that she loves the Microsoft Surface. How much does the billionaire media personality love it? According to a tweet she posted this past Sunday, Oprah has already purchased 12 of the devices as gifts for Christmas.

Don’t expect Apple to lose any sleep over Oprah’s endorsement of Microsoft’s Windows 8 tablet: if you believe Oprah posted the tweet in question, she did so from her iPad.

Lady Gaga-backed Backplane raises funding, goes on shopping spree

Facebook may be the world’s dominant social network, but a number of high-profile investors are betting that there’s room for platform players in the space.

Backplane describes itself as a “start-up uniting people around interests, affinities and movements”, but it’s best-known for running Lady Gaga’s LittleMonsters.com, which is in private beta.

Google+ Pages: what you need to know

If Google+ is ever going to compete with Facebook, it’s clear that Google will need to attract brands and celebrities to its social network.

After all, brands and celebrities have become a fixture on Facebook, with some racking up millions of fans.

Perhaps wisely, Google launched Google+ with a focus on individuals. The logic seems sensible: to build a social network in which individuals can connect with brands and celebrities, you need individuals.

Those individuals, of course, aren’t interested exclusively in liking Coca-Cola or posting messages on Lady Gaga’s wall; they primarily want to interact with real people.

‘Celebrifying’ your business: pros and cons

Some of the world’s most recognizable brands collectively spend billions of dollars annually associating themselves with celebrities (movie stars, athletes, etc.). The logic is simple: consumers love celebrities, and by associating with the right ones, brands can generate goodwill and buzz.

Most young internet businesses don’t have the moola to ink celebrity sponsorships, but that doesn’t mean that celebrities haven’t become an important part of the web startup ecosystem. Just look at Twitter.